Removing downstairs toilet

A house I'm think of buying has a really small downstair toilet at the end of the kitchen extension. It's really too small to keep in it's current state, and it would be mutch better to simply remove it to make better use of the space for the rest of the kitchen.
Does anyone know what would be involved? The soil pipe just disappears down through the concrete floor. Can the pipe be chopped off and capped somehow, or would the whole pipe need tracing back to the main drain and disconnected there?
Cheers, -Duncan
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A friend of mine was refused permission by a building control officer to remove his identical fixture. The BCO's interpretation of Part M was that a house could not be made less accessible to disabled people than it is already. People have disputed his interpretation on this newsgroup. However, you might want to get your local BCO's opinion on this before commiting, as even if you could win an appeal, it might be more effort than it is worth.
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

It never even entered my head that I'd need permission to remove an existing toilet. It really is a waste of space - just a couple of inches each side of the pan! It's barely big enough for an able bodied person to use, let alone someone in a wheelchair!
Thanks for the warning! I'll let you know what they say.
-Duncan
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Sorry to appear pedantic but disabled does not just mean in a wheelchair! There are plenty of people who can walk short distances but cannot manage stairs. I now because I am one of those .
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Peter Crosland wrote:

Okay, I'll ammend the statement to "It's barely big enough for an able bodied person to use, let alone someone in a wheelchair or an overweight limited capacity walker!".
-Duncan
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Christian McArdle wrote:

The answer is, of course, to build and outdie toilet for disabled use :-)
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The answer is do the dirty deed as though you were an Englishman at home in his castle.
First switch the mains off and plug the water feed to the cistern at a suitable place for reconnecting if at a later date that is required. Next remove the cistern and pan and glue a slate or suitable piece of plastic over the sewage pipe with some grip fix or any mastic as a temporary seal.
Next remove the cubicle and see what sort of levels you need to make good with the floors and ceilings etc.
Patch or panel the walls and make good the floor. You may have to hack some of the toilet floor away to put a suitable permanent seal in under the new floor. If it's just going to be covered with cupboards this is unecessary.
Wedge a newspaper in the pipe to stop debris falling down it. It isn't necessary to level the floor if there are going to be units there, as they can be adjusted to almost any floor level.
RSoles that want to tell you how to run your house should be put in their places. Bstrds!
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Michael McNeil wrote:

Thankyou, good advice. Talking to the neighbours of the property yesterday, it seems that the house is probably the last one on the street with the toilet still in place.
-Duncan
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wrote:

And this means? My universal translator is inoperative.
MJ
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| >The answer is, of course, to build and outdie toilet for disabled use :-) | And this means? My universal translator is inoperative.
An outdie toilet is where the cripple falls over and dies of hypothermia
Owain
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An extra toilet is nice but if it opens into the kitchen I just think it's very unhygenic, more so if it doesn't have washing facilities built-in.
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On 13 Sep 2003 11:33:01 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@iname.com (StealthUK) wrote:

Good point. A toilet opening in to a kitchen would almost certainly override anybody's objections to disabled access. And I've got a second toilet downstairs which I would quite happily dismantle without any reference to a Buildings officer if I wanted to. But I don't need the space and I feel it adds more value to the house. It's also useful when some bloody girl is in the upstairs one shaving something.
MJ
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Strangely not. My friend's toilet opens into the kitchen and doesn't even have hand washing facilities. They still wouldn't let him take it out. He's decided to put a wash basin in there anyway, but they couldn't force him to.
Christian.
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On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 09:07:19 +0100, "Christian McArdle"

Not being argumentative, but I only mentioned it because I'd got a vague recollection that it was illegal for this. Maybe on new houses. Maybe not. I'll go back to my cupboard under the stairs now.
MJ
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