Do Toilet Bowls Really Wear Out?

About a year ago, I had to have a new water heater installed in my dad's home. It was in an emergency, so I hired the first, reputable company in the area that could come out to do the job. I'll call them Big Brown. It was a big, 50 year old well known company who had done minor work for my dad before. It was expensive, though, especially when they brought the water heater it up to code. Along with the water heater came a one year maintenence contract whereby they would come by to inspect the water heater in a year. Little did I know that it was less of an inspection of the water heater itself, but more of an inspection of both the inside and outside plumbing with a sales pitch to do more work.
So, they came out last week, and I told them the water heater was working just fine. Then they began looking around, inside and out, to see what else might need their 'attention'.
The home has two bathrooms. Each bathroom was remodeled when my dad moved in around 1987. The toilet colors match the tub and counter colors, which is not white. One is grey, the other is sort of pinky- beige. They both look nice in their surroundings, and really don't look dated. (I wouldn't care if they did.)
Anyway...I think the toilets work just fine. I replaced the tank innards about a year or so ago, when I started taking care of my dad's house. Big Brown told me that both toilets should be replaced because they flushed slow. Huh? Looks fine to me, especially since they always work. Only very infrequently do I ever have to plunge a toilet, but when I do, I can see why. Big Brown told me that the throat of the toilets was getting build up and that makes them begin to flush slower. I said if that's true, why not just take the toilet out, clean the throat, and reinstall. Well ,Big Brown was of course prepared for every do-it-yoursself homeowner's objection. "That only works for a while, you can't all the built up gunk out, you might crack the bowl, and it's just plain old and the newer ones are much better and use less water. I'm not worried about any of that.
They would replace each toilet with their low end, elongated Toto, in white (wouldn't match colors in bathrooms). The cost would be $750 each.
I have a $650 Toto toilet in my own home, installed by me two years ago. It flushes great. It's only clogged twice by my kids. It doesn't have a heated seat, it doesn't was butts, and it doesn't light up, but it does have a slow close lid.
So, if I HAD to replace a toilet, I would get one that has a good reputation, but not because some toilet salesman told me it was flushing slow.
Do toilets wear out like Big Brown said?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/20/2017 7:53 PM, Boris wrote:

Don't walk away, run away.
Toilets often get mineral buildup in the holes in the rim and that can slow flushing. Do a Google search and you will find a lot of information
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qleu_GreXZw

My guess is a good cleaning will keep them going for years to come.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

+1
To OP: Run away from big brown because they are full of shit. There has been many discussions about the cause and Ed is correct. I see in an ad that American Standard has a "self cleaning" toilet. I don't know if it has an additive or wuz up. I can't imagine how the new toilet would address your issue as minerals are responsible.
Anyone tried the as annoyed on TV the toilet cleaning packets? I would think it would affect rubber parts in the tank and seal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Run! Yep. That was my thought, too. Not to mention that both toilets are perfectly clean, in like-new condition, with no mineral stains or other crappy stains. What Big Brown was trying to convince me of was that the throat of the bowl was clogged because he (not me) thought the bowl evacuated too slowly.
He also wanted to install a pressure regulator on the line to the house for $750 because the pressure was 100 psi, and it's dangerous to have more than 85 psi, because I could blow valves in the house. I love the pressure, and I don't see gushers in the neighorhood.
Next, he wanted to replace a beautiful Price Pfister sink lav set, which matched the tub/shower set, with a Delta set, because it was damp under the cold water handle, even though there was no dampness under the cabinet. He said the cartridge had a slow leak. I didn't see, and hadn't noticed a thing in 30 years. If true, why not just replace the cartridge?
Like I said, he came to do a one year inspection on the one year old water heater, as if something is going to go wrong in one year that I wouldn't notice and call in. The next time he wants to schedule a complimentary inspection, I'll just say no.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, April 21, 2017 at 5:23:14 PM UTC-4, Boris wrote:

100 psi is a little high for most household fixtures. I'd look up the specs on your fixtures - especially the water heater - and see what they say about the recommended pressure. You may not have a catastrophic failure, but your fixtures may wear out sooner than "normal". You might assume it was just normal wear and tear, when in reality a lower pressure may have resulted in a longer life. In addition, high pressure can cause other problems, such as water hammer, which can lead to leaks.
Didn't you say this all started because of bad water heater? What was the actual problem? DAGS for water heaters and water pressure. In a closed system water heaters apparently don't like high pressure and can fail because of it.
As far as "no gushers in the neighborhood", I gotta ask:
Do you know for a fact that none of the other houses have pressure regulators? Is it possible, based on what you know, that your dad's house is the only one without a PRV?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


I have all the manuals (and I went online)..install, specs, care, etc, but the pressure specs aren't listed. I'll have to call the mfg, Bradford and White.
You may not have a

The problem was that the old water heater's pan had rusted through from sediment accumulation, and was leaking. It was noticed when the person up in the morning only got luke warm water in the shower. The water heater was about 10 years old, too, It broke on Memorial Day, and people were coming. Yikes.
DAGS for water heaters and water pressure. In a

What is "DAGS"? New codes required an expansion tank,whis is a tank the size of a bbq propane tank, and sits on top of the water heater.

I'll ask neighbors the next time I'm there.
Thanks. All very good questions.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, April 22, 2017 at 6:15:32 PM UTC-4, Boris wrote:

Do A Google Search
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/22/2017 6:12 PM, Boris wrote:

DAGS = Do A Google Search You will find that many codes have a max of 80 psi and most regulators are set to 50 psi
Overly high pressure does cause excessive wear on valves and fixtures.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I didn't look at his pressure meter when he did the pressure test. I'll do one myself next time I'm up there. I'll also call the county to see what they require, or have them come out.
My county is 85. My dad lives in a different county.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 23:53:06 -0000 (UTC), Boris

I think if they didn't work well, you'd know it.

Let's time them! This reminds me of when I bought a new used car, and for some silly reason, I wanted to change the fluid. 35 years ago but the guy at Cottman Transmission in Allentown, Pa. told me changing the fluid came with a 1-year warranty. Now does that make sense? Changing the fluid doesn't keep it from breakign for a year.
But to have the warranty first the transmission has to work well now. And mine didn't they said. What was wrong with it. It was too quiet when it shifted. I said, I thought it was good to be quiet. Yes, but this is too quiet, they said.
I complained to whoever one complains to but they said since I hadn't lost money it wasn't a priority. I do regret not telling him to his face what a liar he was.

I don't think that's because of the toilet anyhow. It's because of what you put down the toilet and because of the pipels. I don't think any toilet ever gets clogged inside the toilet.

The founder of the company, who built its reputation, died, and either the son took over, or worse yet, it was sold to people who are willing to lie to you.

I'm sure they break, but you can tell when the crack goes to the floor and half of the toilet falls off like an iceberg breaking. Well, I'm guessign.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.