Re: Angle Grinder Advice



querky
(if
115mm (4 1/2 inch) is the standard small grinder 230mm (9 inch) for the larger sort I'd suggest you stick to either of those. My preference is for a diamond blade for all masonary tasks. Screwfix will do you a 115mm grinder for 10, 8 for the diamond blade, and a 230mm for 25, 20 for the diamond blade. Not sure of their quality as I have other makes, but I would assume they are on par with DIY store own brand.
Worth getting some metal discs while you're there as 5 115mm metal cutting discs will set you back another 2. Believe me, it's flippin annoying having to go to the store & shell out 4 on a single disc when you need one in a hurry.
The larger grinder is more cumbersome but gives a much easier cut in masonary work and now I'm used to it I prefer it to the 'baby' for any cutting. Tend to use the baby for grinding only now.
Toby.
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On Wed, 9 Jul 2003 19:01:46 +0100, "Brownie"
Make sure you get good eye protection and also a breathing mask. It would also be a good idea to wear clothing that can keep the dust off the rest of the property - I'd suggest one of those cheap one-piece affairs you can buy in any shed.
Angle grinders chuck stuff into the atmosphere which you don't want to be getting in your eye or into your lungs.
Andrew
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On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 21:50:25 +0100, John Rumm

I was forewarned so I taped up both kitchen doors and climbed out through the window. I don't think anyone can be told what it's like, you just have to experience it yourself or you won't believe it. Not being able to see your hand a few inches in front of your face in a lit room is a strange feeling.
--
email: jim.hatfield.org (replace the "a" with "@")

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wrote:

I did this and thought i would only have the one room to clean , but after cleaning up and then removing the tape it was all over the house , it took ages to clean . definatly would have been quicker to do it with a bolster and a mash hammer!!! Ive just bought a few months ago the 9" grinder from Makro cant remember the name but a cheapo yellow one and with a diamond sisc from Ebay ive cut hundreds of cuts in paving slabs seems to be standing up well.
Rob
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Nice not to be follically differently abled
Mike R
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At 10 it's worth buying the Screwfix one to see how you get on with it. If it burns out within a year, you get a replacement under warranty (IME Screwfix are good about replacing things). If it burns out after a year or it just isn't up to the jobs you want to use it for, you can treat it as disposable and use the experience to specify a better/more expensive one with the confidence that you now know what you need.
As it happens I have the 10 Screwfix jobbie and the diamond blade, but only for two weeks so I have no way to know how it'll stand up to hard use. Even if it lasts longer than I do, that tells you nothing - the failure rate could be 90 per cent in the first year and I could have one of the other 10 per cent. At the rate Screfix shifts stuff, even the quality is brilll, there's still going to be somebody out there whose grinder went nova on the first outing. That can happen with any brand, just some are more likely to do it than others.
FWIW, mine feels solid enough and the quality quite adequate, but that's only a superficial judgement and I haven't used any other brands so I don't know how it compares.
W.

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On Wed, 9 Jul 2003 19:01:46 +0100, "Brownie"
Can't imagine how anyone manages without.

115 is good. It's the size of the useful disks you'll use. Bigger grinders are OK, smaller would not be. They don't care too much what the disk size is, so long as the guard is big enough.
Don't remove the guard. It's there to protect you if the grinder kicks upwards.
Grinder quality is somewhat unpredictable, and not especially brand-dependent. Switches are the favourite failure point, and windings a close second. It's not work that kills them, it's dust - particularly conductive dust. Some switches jam on if filled with dust. This is hazardous, and even "good" brands like AEG do it. Cheap grinders work as well as good ones, but they don't do it for so long.
Get a grinder with a pushbutton spindle lock, not two spanners. It's worth getting a quick-release nut that doesn't need spanners - some grinders include them.
Get lots of disks, and lots of different sorts. I find little use for metal grinding disks these days and do nearly everything with flap disks instead. Good quality flap disks are better than cheap ones - I pay the extra for blue Hermes and their special coatings. Screwfix's new flexi disks are handy for not putting flats onto curved pieces, but they cut very slowly.
Paint cleaning disks (loose-weave scouring pad) work well on some paint finishes, poorly on others, and they'll disintegrate rapidly if touched to a metal edge.
Wire brushes are useful and powerful, but use good-quality twisted ones, not loosely crimped ones, or else wear a thick shirt !
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