New Houses

Page 2 of 2  


I don't know how difficult it is, but certainly this is one way that selfbuilders get a decent plot nowadays. There were a couple of examples on Grand Designs IIRC. The house knocked down were nothing like the ones they built.
Though I guess this very much depends on the area and on the other houses, planning guidelines etc.
--
Chris French, Leeds

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Smith wrote:

What you want is a house that does not fit in with its neighbours. A few years back a 1950's infill bungalow (in a street of Victorian houses) two doors from me went for 130K. The buyer got pp for a 2.5 storey pseudo-Victorian house which probably cost 200K tops to build. Resulting house worth 4-500K. And far from the planners putting ever obstacle in the way, as is the norm, they were only too happy to see the replacement.
Having said this, round here developers have cottoned on to the fact that bungalows generally occupy fairly generous sites so they sell on their redevelopment rather than intrinsic value.
--
Tony Bryer SDA UK 'Software to build on' http://www.sda.co.uk
Free SEDBUK boiler database browser
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[15 lines snipped]

What, in America, is charmingly referred to as a "scraper", since you buy the site and scrape the bungalow off it with a bulldozer.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ukmisc.org.uk (Huge) wrote:

The generic term in this country - in the magazines at least - appears to be "bungalow eating". This also, of course, covers the cases where the original isn't simply removed, but is extended, extended, extended.
Hwyl!
M.
--
Martin Angove: http://www.tridwr.demon.co.uk /
Don't fight technology, live with it: http://www.livtech.co.uk /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

In some cases a two floor house is not allowed to be built if a bungalow is there. So, people build a basement and re-build the bungalow.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.520 / Virus Database: 318 - Release Date: 18/09/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Our Stalinist planning system may stand in your way. The planners act as the style police, insisting a house be mock something, when no such regulation exists. In the vast majority of the UK a house can look like you want it to be in theory. The style police stand in the way, you can appeal, it takes time and money, and you will probably win, but most people cave in and go with the style police. Hence you don't see advanced house designs in the UK.
In many other countries it is common to see a superb looking modern house, say on the side of a hill, which will grab your attention, with both complimenting each other. In the UK you only see a hill which you ignore.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.520 / Virus Database: 318 - Release Date: 18/09/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, the quality of design of new UK houses is somewhat bland to say the least.
John.

houses
I
is
the
you
appeal,
in
in
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi
From what I've seen of Victorian houses round here they're very variable. The best ones are very good, tho of course with the odd point in which they dont match new, ie insulation, layout, the tendency to stick a 4" walled bit on the back, very close spacing, etc.
But... at the cheaper end of the scale with Vics, basically anything goes. I've seen some scary looking structures, ones that really have done well to survive the century. I mean houses with huge gaps in the structure, sank 4" at one end, houses with joists so thin its a wonder the owner dare go upstairs, multistorey houses with only 4" walls, that sort of thing.
Of course the worst ones have gone, since they fell down or were condemned. Really I think if you buy a Vic you should understand what kind of structure youre buying, because there are some bad houses around.
Regards, NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.