My first sash window! (A bit long)

Well, this weekend saw my partner Polly and I tackle our first sash window renovation. I've had ome excellent advice on this, and I promised to post the results - as it happens, we haven't finished, but I'll post the results so far, anyway...
We put out a request for help to our friends and were very gratefully surprised to get four helpers showing up on Saturday morning (just) and displaying levels of enthusiasm that stunned us! We provided sandwiches for lunch, and curry and wine for dinner...
I had started on Friday evening by removing the staff beads and furniture so the first task was to remove the sashes. The inner came out easily, the parting bead was a doddle, but the outer sash took even more cajoling than I had expected; this was not helped by a very loose joint which we were trying to be careful not to stress too much. The sashes went out to the garden and the girls started stripping (the paint from the sashes, unfortunately).
The sealing around the outside of the frame proved to be very loose, so we decided to pull it all out and replace it. There turned out to be a large gap on the left side between the stonework and the frame, and on pulling out the cement we found that the gap had been stuffed with newspaper. Eventually we pulled out a fragment with the date at the top: Friday 22 February 1924!
Work went more slowly than I had expected (and there was more to do) but by the end of Saturday we had stripped all the woodwork, cleared out all the debris from the sash pockets, filled the gaps with expending foam, painted the cill with fibreglass resin and started the painting, so we all settled down to a well deserved round of Thai curry and New Zealand wine!
By Sunday morning, through our bleary, hungover eyes, it became obvious that we were never going get both coats of Ranch paint dry in time, so we elected to go and get a board to cover the window and take our sweet time over it. By the end of Sunday we had sanded down the foam and sealed the exterior of the frame with silicone, first coated everything and stripped all the paint off the brasswork, so we screwed the board in place over the window and sat back, pretty exhausted.
All we need to do now is second-coat all the woodwork and reassemble - most of the hard work is done. I think we've made more of a meal of it than perhaps more experienced DIYers would have, but then we've stripped it back to bare wood and started virtually from scratch. I'm so pleased with the state of all of the wood given its (minimum) age, and it seems worth doing a really good job and not cutting any corners.
Thanks everyone for all the advice. I'll post the final results when they're done, possibly on Wednesday (depends how much we can get done in the evenings).
Cheers - Adam...
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Adam wrote in message

Landed on your feet with the weather eh? Pinning the sahes back in the frame saves boarding up between work sessions and allows both sides to dry. How did the fibreglass resin work out? Last time I used it the hardener was a paste, which made it difficult to disperse evenly. Had it cured okay overnight or were you too bleary eyed to notice?
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-8<- snip ->8-

Hi Stuart,
I meant to give the resin a special mention: top tip! I acually didn't use hardner - sat and thought about whether I'd need it or not and decided that a) not using it would encourage better penetration and b) if it didn't go off in a reasonable time I could always add another layer with hardner [and also c) with the wood as a matrix it shouldn't need it].
As it happened, it cured overnight and left a perfect surface for the paint.
We've been very lucky with the weather, and even the drizzle that hit almost all of Edinburgh yesterday seemed to leave us alone!
All we've got left to do is to try to work out how to fit the Mighton draught-proofing strips and parting beads. We need to cut a 2mm wide by 6mm deep trench in the sashes and fit the parting bead into a 12mm wide gap (when it's supposed to go into a 8.5mm gap).
Cheers - Adam...
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Adam wrote in message

Cured without the catalyst? Well, I'll take your word for it but....

Quite easy with a router I should think, although 2mm is a mighty small cutter size.

For that I would grease/vaseline one edge of the bead and pin it in position. Fill to the edge of the 12mm gap with car body filler (you *will* need the hardener this time:-)). The bead should then fit snugly, and be removeable. Forget the grease if you're confident you won't have to remove it for any reason.
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