asbestos

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wrote:

seller. I would not admit to anyone official that this stuff is there, just incase they made you

I've packed mine up in Visqueen now so the dump will take them...left them in the front garden. Some thieving sod had one away last night...found it half way down the street, ripped open.....hahaha...bet he got a right lungful of it....
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Some chicken sheds I encountered had the usual corrugated cement asbestos roofing sheets. However the sheds were fully insulated, and lined internally with some type of smooth asbestos sheet.
ISTR something about these smooth interior sheets being much more dangerous than the corrugated cement type, possibly made of brown asbestos. In a report on a death in the local paper, a wife described how he 'only moved the sheets about', he never cut them up.
Roger
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Bluestars wrote:

I thought it was blue asbestos that was the worts...ogh well. Who cares?
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wrote:

Me. 30 years ago I worked for a few months in shed clad in an asbestos based material. It was an old aircraft hangar. That is the only time I haver been in contact with asbestos in over 40 years of working. Last year a scan found asbestos damage on a lung. It isn't treatable and all I can do is go along for a scan every year to check for further damage.
Don't be so cocky. It could be you next with some substance the government knew might cause long term damage but kept quiet about . It happened with lead, phosphorous, tricloroethane and asbestos. No reason to suppose it can't happen again. Alan G
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AlanG wrote:

That's as far as you know. It was commonly used in many industrial and domestic applications, from fire insulation to brake pads.
I am not sorry to see it go - there was no need to take even
tiny risks as other materials were available, but the whole
'panic: Asbestos: I will die tomorrow' attitude is IMHO very unhelpful.

I have messed around with so many different chemicals, smoked, injured myself etc etc that I am surprised I have lasted this long.
We all have to die of something. I've had a lot of fun along the way too. I'd rather have 30 good years than 70 miserable fear filled hypochondriac ones.
I have always felt I was living on borrwed tme since my 30'th birthday anyway.
:-)

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wrote:

Indeed. However there is no indication that general exposure to these caused any problems.

I agree. I worked in the petrochemical industry for most of my life and was very safety conscious but only on what I knew to be a danger. If the relevant government department keeps secret the dangers of exposure to substances we don't really have much chance to avoid them.

I will not be popping my clogs tomorrow but the fact that I will almost certainly die earlier than I would have done doesn't exactly fill me with joy.

I would rather have 90 healthy years

That may be truer than you imagine

Alan G
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AlanG wrote:

What has the goverment got to do with this? The vast majority of occupational exposure studies (where most good long term toxicity data comes from) are carried out by universities, and published in publicly available journals. Often long before the 'government' know anything about it.
--
Grunff


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The dangers of lead, phosphorous, asbestos etc. were known by the relevant government departments for decades but they were kept secret from the public. It wasn't until the start of the 70s IIRC that safety regulations with potentially harmful substances started to get some teeth. Even in the 80s we had to fight to get Trichloroethane accepted as dangerous. It's banned now.
-- Alan G "The corporate life [of society] must be subservient to the lives of the parts instead of the lives of the parts being subservient to the corporate life." (Herbert Spencer)
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AlanG wrote:

What the hell are you on about? Trichloroethane is not banned; it's readily available from any chemical supplier.
There are restrictions on it's use, but not because of it's toxicity; because of it's ozone depletion potential. There are far more toxic solvents in everyday use in labs all over the world.
--
Grunff


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We used to use it as a degreaser. The literature I got in the early 90s said it was now illegal to use it as such.

There were restrictions put on how it was used after a young aircraft fitter was brain damaged through inhalation of the vapour from a tank of the stuff. I was a shop steward in at the time and distinctly remember a union pamphlet full of self congratualtion when the stuff was finally declared dangerous and safe handling procedures brought in. Until then it was common practise to use it in open tanks or dishes with no skin protection or protection from the fumes. The stuff was effectively banned as a solvent cleaner because of ozone depletion in the 90s. There were even reports of smugglers running it across borders because manufacturers couldn't find an alternative. I know I had a hell of a job finding a solvent cleaner that could replace it without damaging some of the components.
There are

But only under strictly controlled conditions. Just like asbestos or phospherous or lead. We are far more safety concious now than we were only a few decades ago.
Fortunately I'm retired from that and wouldn't willingly go back even if you paid me :)
-- Alan G "The corporate life [of society] must be subservient to the lives of the parts instead of the lives of the parts being subservient to the corporate life." (Herbert Spencer)
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AlanG wrote:

Restricting use and banning are two totally different things.

Paranoid is a far closer description. Many things which get banned from certain applications were doing very little harm in that application. Lead in petrol is a point in case.
--
Grunff


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Compared to the alternative junk kicked out by diesel engines, which are seeing rather a large increase in use I think.
PoP
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Robbie Chuff wrote:

Essentially you have several choices.
(i) do it youreself, smash it up and stuff it in plastic bags and dump it by teh roadside. (ii) Pay through the nose to have a bunch of 'sbestors disposla specialists' do exactl the same thing. (iii) As (i) but take it to the tip, and pay presumably teh council.. (iv) pay through several noses to have (ii|) happen, but have it end up in teh skip. (v) Pay an arm, several legs AND through several noses to get a complete overkill, road closed, flashing hazard lights, encase the entire neighnourhood in plastic with negative air pressure, have men in suits that make sellafield look like toytown, and get it dumped in the council skip for landfill...
Or take it off yourself, put in black plastic bags in yer black wheelie bin or bury it at the bottom of the garden.
The approach to take depends on your cost benefit analysis of the risks of asbestos, law breaking, and teh social stignma of being o teh front page of te CEN 'prominent Cambridge citizen acused of illegal asbestos transportation in back of Volvo' etc etc.
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

It's worth pointing out that many local councils (no idea about yours in particular) will take non-industrial quantities of asbestos free of charge (or at least they used to).
If you are going to remove yourself, wet it down thoroughly, and have some tough plastic bags handy.
--
Grunff

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Grunff wrote:

A couple of years ago the bloke opposite my dad's was demolishing an entire asbestos garage. The local Council tip supplied him with tough, bright orange plastic bags clearly labelled as containing asbestos waste, and some clear plastic bags. He had to put the asbestos in the clear bags, then put those in the orange ones, tie them closed, and take them to the tip.
The only inconvenience was that they would only give him a few (6?) bags at a time (so they didn't have the entire garage arrive at once) and he had to phone in advance to let them know he was bringing the full bags (so they could arrange to put them straight in the landfill rather than have them lying around).
As for cost, it was either free, or a small nominal charge (to reduce the temptation to fly-tip I guess because they have to clear the mess up and decontamiate the dumping site). This was Lancs CC but I would expect most/all councils provide a similar service.

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