Anti WD- 40

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I know a number here are not fans of WD-40, but anyways....
I am looking for suggestons for Anti WD-40.
ie something that "sticks free mechanisms" rather than freeing stuck ones.
It's the sunroof handle in the car, it's supposed to fold up into the "roof", but it's got brewers droop.
I have tried coating the hinge with rasberry jam (This worked well on the ball and socket joint on the door mirror of my last car when it wouldn't stay put) but I didn't have any English jam to hand only some nasty French stuff.
Any suggestions for what else I might try?
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Chris Holmes wrote:

I think you're trolling, but just in case you aren't...
Remove the handle, and bend the pivot pin slightly. Then put it back together.
--
Grunff


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snipped-for-privacy@uk2.net (Chris Holmes) wrote:

Blu-tack?
Peter
--
Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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Could you not milk the subject and try using freshly whipped cream mixed with the raspberry jam - I find this very useful apart from the obvious.... lol
Brian
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thread loc?
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On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 15:11:56 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@uk2.net wrote:

<snip>
Rocol "Kilopoise" Lubricant - RS sell it (search on http://rswww.com )
Adrian, UK
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It's called Locktite, available in various grades from vaguely stopping removal, to No ******** chance of removal. An Airborne radar I once worked on had the wrong type labled on it So when you tried to remove the cover for service almost every Screw head broke off.!!!
The Q
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Chris Holmes wrote:

Superglue. Just keep wiggling as it sets, and spread something underneath to catch the drops.
Its totally siezed a micro ballrace I had :-(

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wrote:

My favorites use for WD-40 is removing the top cover off my printer ribbons (dot Matrix) giving a good spray on to the dried up ribbon and left to stand over night. It will extending the life of the ribbon for up to 2 weeks or more.
I have been doing this for years on 2 different printers (over about 12 years.
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Nice to know someone's actually found a good use for the stuff.
--
*Honk if you love peace and quiet.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 13:09:15 +0100, Dave Plowman

I was once told that in the early days of BBC sports OBs when the slo-mos came from huge disk players (2 inch tape not being able to play at anything but normal speed) - some bright spark found the heads could be made to last longer by coating the disk in WD40. Maybe total rubbish.......
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wrote:

I also have a bad habit of hoarding this kind of financial information - I'm told by my accountant that I really shouldn't. The reason? Tax. Now, I spend good money making sure that I pay the correct amount of tax - what I;m supposed to, but no more. Life and the IR being what it is, though, it is always likely that a routine check could come my way. Documentation has to be kept for a statutory amount of time, 6years IIRC. IR investigations can go back only 6 years, BUT, if they find any anomolies (and there's no lower limit on this), they can go back another 6 years. But not if you don't have the documentation (and that is, AIUI, completely legal)!
Think I'll buy a shredder, and the correct oil!
Another incorrect oil usage horror anecdote is when I was first learning to play a brass instrument back in junior school. One of the kids was moved onto a trombone. Delicate instruments, trombones.... he took it home, and within the first week or two the slide was sticking slightly (oiling generally only took place during weekly lessons). His dad decided that the best thing was "ultra-thin oil" which turned out to be ... 3-in-1 !!!! Of course the slide action after that was something as easy as trying to run through a thick mud pool. The brass teacher spent about 30 minutes with washing up liquid trying to flush all remnants of that stuff out.... at that age I don't think I understood half of the words that he uttered.
cheers Richard
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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I recall my brother doing something not unrelated when learning the trumpet (he's now a professional trumpet player). One of the small tuning slides on his trumpet had got a little too stiff to slide and get into the right position, and being on-stage at the time, he didn't have the oil with him. Instead, he borrowed the slide oil from the trombone player next to him. It worked wonderfully well, so much so that the trumpet tuning slide wouldn't stay in place at all, and a good strong blow blew it right off...
A former boss of mine used to play trombone in a local amateur jazz band. I think that just before the concert, he must have given his trombone a cleaning and oiling that it would not often get. Anyway, partway through the concert, whilst pushing the mute into the end of the trombone and making sure it is firmly in so it doesn't fall out onto the stage with an embarrassing crash, his nicely oiled trombone slide let loose and went crashing at some speed through two rows of wind players down a stepped stage, before coming to rest on the floor just near the conductor.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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SWMBO has just spent an ungodly sum of money on new stainless steel appliances from an industrial kitchen supplier and whilst in the shop she wanted to buy some 'special' stainless steel cleaner to keep fingermarks at bay.
The guy in the shop stated that it was all a waste of money and all that you needed was a couple of squirts of WD40 on a soft cloth and then just wipe.
SWMBO was quite disappointed that she wasn't able to add a new 'product' to the supermarket of them under the sink ;-)
So far we have only tried using this method on the door of the dishwasher only (other appliances not yet fitted) and it worked a treat.
Rob
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Surely there is something already in the kitchen which would do as well, but not bring that beautiful factory-floor aroma into the house where it will not be appreciated by the barbarians? I can just imagine my daughter coming in and asking "Has the dog been sick in here?"
--
roger

delete x's to email
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"rob" wrote | There is actually very little smell
I like the smell of WD40 :-)
| Also SWMBO doesn't understand that the 15 or so bottles under the sink are | all basically the same thing - she has to have one for windows, one for the | worksurface, one for the floor etc etc (and WD40 is ALOT cheaper than SS | cleaner) ;-)
My mother once found she was getting a lovely shine on the windows, but a slightly more-powerful than usual smell, when she reached for the Wasp Killer instead of the Windowlene.
I once bought a jumbo economy super saver bottle of shampoo. It turned out to be not nice as shampoo, but it was fine for dish-washing.
Owain
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To get back to the subject, (Back from camping hol now, sorry I missed the London Meat)
Locktite ect would be no good as I still want to be able to pull the handle down, just don't want it fallig down. Will try the pivot pin bending suggestion if I can manage to drive it out.
Failing that, i'll try salted butter as suggested by one poster (Hmm.. might make an interesting change from the strawberry jam and whipped cream in other situations too! :=))
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On Mon, 4 Aug 2003 10:43:26 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@uk2.net (Chris Holmes) wrote:

Remember Last Tango in Paris....!
--
Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
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You could try some silicone sealant - just a spot. When dry, operate the handle to 'shear' it. With a bit of luck it will provide some friction.
--
*Time is fun when you're having flies... Kermit

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Dunno about that, but someone round here suggested that Perineum (sp?) is Latin for chin rest :=))
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