wiring up a brick wall

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Greetings,
I have a row home (townhouse) which shares a common brick wall with the neighboring house. The wall is coated with about 1/2" of mortar followed by a skim coat of plaster and then 100 years of paint. I need to install some outlets along the wall.
My plan was to trench out shallow trenches along the wall and into the brick. I would install FMC (1/2") which would come almost to the surface. I would then go back over with mortar, a skim coat of gypsum, and paint. Larger holes would be knocked out for boxes (do I need to use special in mortar boxes?).
Is there anything wrong with what I propose? Example things that could be wrong (partial list) a) Steel or Al FMC is not suitable. b) The depth is not suitable. c) I need to additionally derate the FMC and I don't know it. d) I'm not allow to make holes in the fire wall big enough for the boxes. e) ...
Am I going about this properly? What other things do I need to consider?
Thank you for your input, William
PS: NO. I do not want to use surface mount if I can avoid it.
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Then use floor moounted outlets, or glue furring strips to the wall, run armored conduit behind it, and cover it with sheetrock. Don't mess with the partition wall.
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Greetings,
Thank you for your post but I still don't have enough information to make a decision.
Don't mess with partition walls because it's a job you don't know how to handle or don't mess with them because it's not allowed? I am not looking for "another way" I am looking to attempt to perform the job in the manner specified safely and to code (building, electrical, and otherwise) if possible.
Hope to hear more, William
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Cutting into a structural firewall can be a violation of the code. I'd look for other way, either surface or floor mounted.
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wrote in

Besides, do I recall that this was a condo? There might be association requirements stating that you're not to touch that wall. That hurdle out of the way, any insurance or bank problems with it? THEN, I'd go to your local code enforcement and ask there. The best you could get here is experience, good as it may be, but NOT for your particular locale. NEC applies of course, but many local codes go beyond that.
JMO, but I think you need those items crossed off before you go too much further with the rest of the plan; they could make it all a minor or major detail.
HTH, PopS
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Greetings,
It is not a condo. It is a single family home. I own the houses on both sides of this house. There is not a bank problem because there is no mortgage on either home. There is no insurance problem because I don't carry insurance on the home (I am not required to and I don't). Yes, I do have an umbrella policy for my business.
Hope this helps, William
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" snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com" wrote:

Talk to local building permitting bunch--they'll tell you the exact skinny for both your specific structure and locale...
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Both. You almost certainly aren't allowed to mess with it, and that wall is not just a fire-barrier, it's part of the structure of the building that's designed to reduce noise, and resist vertical, earthquake, and wind loads. If you're having to ask about it here, you don't know enough about what it's doing and what effect your modifications will have on the various roles that wall is expected to play.
And for certain, nobody out on the internet is in a position to make a better guess.

If the first idea that's in your head is wedged so firmly that you can't get it out, then hire a professional to do the evaluation an subsequent work. Otherwise, let go of that idea, and come up with a new one, because hacking into the partition-wall with a masonry saw on your own hook is in no way a good idea.
--Goedjn
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Greetings,
Why are you so sure that I am not allowed to mess with it? If the firewall is 10" thick and I make a 2 inch deep trough and later fill it in with mortar (and some outlet box holes) it won't change the structural integrity. It won't make it so the neighbors can hear through the wall. It won't change the fire rating to less than two sheets of 5/8" drywall which is used for partition walls between houses I have seen in the past. In short, I know it is probably safe. I am wondering about the code issues. Just because something is safe doesn't mean it complies with code. Of course local code could say ANYTHING but I am not asking if this violates local codes that no one here could know about. I am asking if it violates national codes or if (for some reason I cannot think of) there is in fact a safety concern.
Why are you so sure everyone on the Internet is dumb and cannot provide helpful advice? Why can't I tackle a project that I don't already know how to complete before I start? Plenty of people complete projects safely that they knew very little about before they started.
Update on materials used: I have found some PVC coated MC suitable for direct burial in concrete which has a smaller OD than 1/2" FMC so I have switched to using PVC coated MC with concrete tight connectors.
Hope this helps, William
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Rather that take advice from the people you are criticizing, ask your building inspector. He will know the codes, he will know if it is allowed. He may also know an easy way to do it.
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Greetings,
When I ask a building inspector they generally just tell me a specific way to do it. The way "suggested" by the inspector way might not be the best way for my situation, might cost extra, might be extra work, might reduce the overall quality of the job but after they tell me "do it like this" then I am stuck. For instance, the inspector could say "why don't you just put up furring strips" and then, even if there were many other "legal" "better" options I would appear to be arguing with him to do otherwise. I want to come to the building inspector with a sound, code complete plan which works and doesn't have holes. The inspector will then approve my plan or site the local code I am violating and I will modify accordingly.
The only people I ever criticize here are naysayers. If I say, "How do I do XYZ" and someone says "Call a pro." or "You can't." but doesn't explain to give further depth of understanding then yes, I might criticize them. If someone says "you're too dumb to do that job" or "no one that uses the Internet could ever help" then I will definitely say something in response. I have successfully completed every job I have ever asked about on alt.home.repair. So yes, I probably can and will do that job. I might change my plans or methods based on input from alt.home.repair and elsewhere -- but the job is going to get done. (PS: I am very happy to know that I can't do XYZ if someone says why. I am especially happy to know if they site specifically why and give a reference. If someone JUST says "you can't" for all I know they are wrong and my knowledge of the situation has not been increased.)
There are many people on alt.home.repair who I have found to be very very helpful. A Mr. Miller and several others come to mind (don't want to list because I am sure I will leave someone good out). Some people are also hit and miss. I enjoy reading their thoughts even if I don't always agree with them. It is nice to get a second opinion. It is even nice to have a better understanding of common misconceptions.
Hope this helps, William
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You don't know what you are doing. You don't know the local code. You won't hire a pro. You want free advice from people who may have little to no knowledge of your particular job, the local building code, et c. And you accuse the voice of sanity of being a naysayer. Use conduit.
Dave M.
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Greetings,
You say "Use conduit" but there is no additional information as to why. Is there something wrong with PVC coated MC? The MC is MUCH easier to use than anything else because I only have to go as deep as the brick for most of the run. I will try to post some photos in the next couple hours.
William
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William,
Sorry, I was too brief. Leave the wall alone. Run your wiring outside of the wall in nice looking, painted conduit.
Dave M.
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If you're not burrying the cable 1.5" deep into the wall, you want metal between it (the cable) and the wall surface, so not using metal conduit means having to trench deeper than you otherwise would.
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Greetings,
I believe there is no minimum cable depth for my application. Please see my other posts.
William
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one wonders why you brought the question to usenet to begin with. from what i can see all you've done is berate people giving you answers as best they can, except for the one person who gave you an answer in line with your original thinking.
why even ask if you have the answers?
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Greetings,
Goedjn says: If you're not burrying the cable 1.5" deep into the wall, you want metal between it (the cable) and the wall surface, so not using metal conduit means having to trench deeper than you otherwise would.
I believe he means a 1/16" metal plate is required by 300.4(E) if the cable is not at least 1 1/4 inches below the surface of a trench? If this is what he means then I have already stated why I thought 300.4(E) didn't apply and he is invited to reply further (perferably in that sub-thread) if he thinks it does and can state why. If he is not referring to 300.4(E) then what rule does he mean?
Thanks, William
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

See? It's not hard. You quoted, attributed and didn't top post. Excellent.
If you don't mind me asking, why are you replying to Goedjn and asking him for clarification using "he" instead of "you"?
R
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I find it very interesting that wdeans has stopped quoting people and just posts unattributed responses. It kind of fits in with the talking and not listening mentality, which is apparently how he wants to approach his building inspector. Anyone care to guess how your friendly neighborhood building inspector will react to such an approach?
R
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