Where do you buy food grade corn starch and calcium phosphate?

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On Tue, 13 Jan 2015 11:17:39 +0000 (UTC), Whitney Ryan

Do you often talk about making large quantities of a white powdery substance in alt.home.repair?
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http://dwb.unl.edu/Teacher/NSF/C12/C12Links/www.cosmocel.com.mx/english/c-leave.htm SODIUM ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE
USES
IN FOOD INDUSTRY: The main use for SODIUM ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE, is as a leavening agent or acid for mixing baking powders, this is a new product in the baking industry. The SODIUM ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE, has a different performance profile than other leavening agents; it reacts slowly with the Sodium Bicarbonate in the mixing stage, there is only a 20 to 30 % Carbon Dioxide delivery from available. The difference is released during the oven stage.
The SODIUM ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE also has an excellent buffering action for flour mixes, enhancing the properties of the formula ingredients. When using SODIUM ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE, the product is crunchy and has fine texture. Its use is very generalized. top
SODIUM ALUMINUM SULFATE
USES
IN FOOD INDUSTRY: The SODIUM ALUMINUM SULFATE, is a high neutralizing powder leavening agent used in bakery, is slow for reacting in the dough mixing and preparing cycles, even though, it reacts quickly in the oven cycle, evolving most of the Carbon Dioxide, as a reaction product with the Sodium Bicarbonate present in the baking powder formulation. The SODIUM ALUMINUM SULFATE forms a very good dual system with Monocalcium Phosphate in double action baking powders. The SODIUM ALUMINUM SULFATE use , is the best way to enhance the properties of the baking powders, and, at the same time to reduce the formulation costs for baking powders producers.
IN GENERAL: The SODIUM ALUMINUM SULFATE is used to dye and to print fibers, in the preparation of inks, lacquers, paper, vegetal gum, cement, porcelain, explosives, cement, tannery, water purification, in sugar mills, and also as Ammonia synthesis catalyst. top
MONOCALCIUM PHOSPHATE
USES
IN FOOD INDUSTRY: The most important use of the MONOCALCIUM PHOSPHATE in the food industry is as the acid component in the baking powders.
A baking powder is defined as the mixture of materials capable to evolve gas in dough preparations, under certain conditions of humidity and temperature, once the gas is present , it expands, increasing the dough volume in such a way that the product has to form many empty cells once baked, due to the presence of Sodium Bicarbonate in the baking powder formulations. The gas evolved is Carbon Dioxide.
If it is used a baking powder having only Sodium Bicarbonate, the final product is yellowish, will have high pH, and it will not be so fluffy as when using with MONOCALCIUM PHOSPHATE. In the present, the baking powder formulations have a mix of acids or leavening agents, to promote a controlled Carbon Dioxide evolution along the baking cycles, since the dough preparation, to the final part in the oven.
The MONOCALCIUM PHOSPHATE also works as a pH regulator in the baked product, due to the resulting buffer salts from the fermentation process.
A typical double action baking powder may have 12 % of MONOCALCIUM PHOSPHATE, 30 % of Sodium Bicarbonate, 23 % of Sodium Aluminum Sulfate, 35 % of Corn Starch.
The MONOCALCIUM PHOSPHATE is also used in the preparation of Phosphated flour, prepared flours and other mixes.
The MONOCALCIUM PHOSPHATE is used in the powder drinks preparations.
IN GENERAL: The MONOCALCIUM PHOSPHATE is used as fertilizer complement, in the opaque glass manufacture, and in the paint preparations for steel enamels. It is also used in the balanced mixes of feed formulas.
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On Monday, January 12, 2015 at 2:30:48 PM UTC-6, Whitney Ryan wrote:

http://www.buywholefoodsonline.co.uk/cream-of-tartar-1kg.html
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Nunya Bidnits wrote, on Tue, 13 Jan 2015 18:14:47 -0600:

I'm going to guess that the OP plans to make the baking powder on the fly, so, that will never be a problem.
Both ingredients would (essentially) never go bad (as long as they're both kept reasonably dry).
Ingredient #1: Baking Soda Ingredient #2: Cream of Tartar (or equivalent acid salt)
If you buy a ten dollar bag of each, it will last the rest of your life and it will work for all recipes requiring either baking soda or single-acting baking powder.
If the OP wants double acting backing powder, he needs Ingredient #3: Corn Starch
But, the point is that one large bag of each will last most of us our lifetimes, and we'll never have to run to the store to pick it up in a pinch.
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On Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 8:27:01 PM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote:

I don't think the corn starch has anything to do with the double acting part, ie that it does some gas generation immediately when mixed, the rest when heated. That would seem to depend on the characteristics of the acid. I think the corn starch is just there to prevent help prevent it from absorbing humidity and going bad on the shelf.
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By the time you endure the expense of the ingredients, you'd have been better tt go buy baking powder at your grocery.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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Whitney Ryan wrote:

http://www.webstaurantstore.com/45049/cream-of-tartar.html
If you don't want to purchase it from the web find a restaurant supplier that may sell it to you.
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Ingredient #1: Baking Soda $5.24 for 13-1/2 pounds, at Costco http://costcocorner.com/2013/05/arm-and-hammer-baking-soda-13-5-lbs-5-24/
Ingredient #2: Cream of Tartar (or equivalent acid salt) $6.81 for 1 pound, at a restaurant supply house http://www.webstaurantstore.com/45049/cream-of-tartar.html
Ingredient #3: Corn Starch $2 for 1 pound almost anywhere (Amazon.com product link shortened)
So, for less than $15, the OP can make baking powder, limited only by the shelf life of the separated ingredients.
I know the baking soda lasts forever (kept dry). So should the cream of tartar (kept dry).
How long is the shelf life of the corn starch?
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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Wed, 14 Jan 2015 09:11:28 -0500:

Baking powder, at the store, is about $6 per pound.
Baking soda, alone, is five cents a pound. Cream of tartar is seven dollars a pound. Corn starch, if used, is two dollars a pound.
So, it would seem that the entire expense of the baking powder is in the cream of tartar.
Because of that, one would expect grocery store suppliers to skimp on that particular ingredient, substituting something cheaper instead.
Do they?
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On 1/14/2015 10:07 AM, Danny D. wrote:

As with any thing, I expect the honest suppliers are honest, the discount suppliers do that kind of thing. Nothing is new, under the sun.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Wednesday, January 14, 2015 at 10:07:57 AM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote:

IDK where that price came from. Best pricing I've seen is Costco, where for a big back it's probably more like 50 centa a pound

Given that the ingredinet that the OP listed for making baking powder apparently isn't cream of tartar, I'd say yes. I think there is more to it than that though, as the other ingredient that is the acid part is likely what gives it the double acting ability, where cream of tartar wouldn't.
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On 1/12/2015 3:30 PM, Whitney Ryan wrote:

You BOUGHT baking soda?
DIY BAKING SODA <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baking_powder#Substitutes_for_baking_soda In times past, when chemically manufactured baking soda was not available, "ash water" was used instead. Ashes from hardwood trees contain carbonates and bicarbonate salts, which can be extracted with water. This approach became obsolete with the availability of purified baking soda.
re DIY BAKING POWDER (also obsolete)
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baking_powder#Single_vs_double_acting_baking_powders "The acid in a baking powder can be either fast-acting or slow-acting.[7] A fast-acting acid reacts in a wet mixture with baking soda at room temperature, and a slow-acting acid will not react until heated in an oven. Baking powders that contain both fast- and slow-acting acids are double acting; those that contain only one acid are single acting. By providing a second rise in the oven, double-acting baking powders increase the reliability of baked goods by rendering the time elapsed between mixing and baking less critical, and this is the type most widely available to consumers today."
For the ingredients in some commercial baking powders see: <http://whatscookingamerica.net/Q-A/BakingPowder.htm > Baking powder, as far as I can tell, is

Calcium phosphate is not CREAM OF TARTAR (KC4H5O6)
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potassium_bitartrate "Potassium bitartrate, also known as potassium hydrogen tartrate, with formula KC4H5O6, is a byproduct of winemaking. In cooking it is known as cream of tartar." "A similar acid salt, sodium acid pyrophosphate, can be confused with cream of tartar because of their common function as a component of baking powder."
HTH
Susan
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Danny D. wrote:

Until the cabinet beetles find it unless you don't mind a little protein in the baking powder.
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On Tue, 13 Jan 2015 11:18:31 +0000 (UTC), Whitney Ryan wrote:

You said you wanted to make a small amount of it.
This is you Julie, isn't it!?!?
-sw
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On Wed, 14 Jan 2015 15:07:24 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Do your cakes rise?
If so, what they sell is good enough. I doubt if Arm & Hammer has changed its forumula. Those who bake several times a week would notice and it would ruin their reputation.
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