What year is this freezer?

My Coldspot/Sears upright freezer is dying. I am trying to figure out how long we have had it. 30+ years is my wife's guess. Model is 106.628440. The original parts list does not have a date and we can't find any sales slip or other info. Any idea how to tell about how old it is?
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On 1/20/2013 11:50 PM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Is there a label with a serial number? It shouldn't be a problem to find out how old it is if you can find the model and serial number. If you can see a label or numbers stamped into the metal can of the compressor, you can find out it's age that way. The guys working at the appliance parts supply house can look it up for you. ^_^
TDD
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Were the operating instruction written in Sanskrit?
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a new freezer will pay for itself in under a year in eletricity savings, note chest freezers are far more efficent than upright ones......
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On 1/21/2013 7:31 AM, bob haller wrote:

in some short time. BTW, mine is not broken and still works quite well. Someone here suggested that I use a Kill-a-watt unit to check how much electricity the thing actually uses. I feel stupid because I have a Kill-a-watt unit and didn't really remember that is can be set up to gather power data over a long period of time. Anyway, I ran the freezer through the Kill-a-watt for a week and then calculated the cost using my local provider's cost per kilowatt. I found that it only cost about $110 per year to run it. So it would not pay for itself in a year or even several years, so it's still chugging along. I know this doesn't help the OP as his is on its last leg.
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wrote:

Difference in operating cost between a 1984 spec 17 cu ft chest freezer and today's energy star rated unit would amount to roughly $50 per year. PLEASE show me where I can by an energy star rated 17 cu ft chest freezer for $50 - or even $150.
Calculated at $0.14 KwH
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If the unit still has the serial number sticker, sometimes it says if it's R12 refrigerant, or R134a. They changed over about 1994 or 1995. Might be some help.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My Coldspot/Sears upright freezer is dying. I am trying to figure out how long we have had it. 30+ years is my wife's guess. Model is 106.628440. The original parts list does not have a date and we can't find any sales slip or other info. Any idea how to tell about how old it is?
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On Mon, 21 Jan 2013 08:13:14 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Could very well be R22 though.
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Never sure. Peoples memories do strange things.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
With a "guestimate" of 30 years, you KNOW it was not R134.
Could very well be R22 though.
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If it's got black tubular coils, cleaning them can sometimes help, a lot.
Freezers also do leak refrigerant, and might need to be charged up. I've done enough of those. Sometimes, slow leak can leak out the refrigerant over a period of years, and a charge can buy you some time. Not many techs bother with refrigerant charges. Some do, like me.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My Coldspot/Sears upright freezer is dying. I am trying to figure out how long we have had it. 30+ years is my wife's guess. Model is 106.628440. The original parts list does not have a date and we can't find any sales slip or other info. Any idea how to tell about how old it is?
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On Mon, 21 Jan 2013 09:22:53 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

them. And if there is no leak, they will NOT loose gas.
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It's been a while since I got my EPA card. But back then, if a system has less than 50 pounds of refrigerant, it's legal to top them off as often and as much as you want.
USA rules, y'know.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
If you cannot locate and repair the leak, it is ILLEGA:L to regas them. And if there is no leak, they will NOT loose gas.
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On Mon, 21 Jan 2013 15:17:45 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

first
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I sensed that the regulations were different in Canada.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Up here even a 2 lb system you cannot top up unless you repair it first
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On Sun, 20 Jan 2013 21:50:25 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

If it's dying, the age dont much matter anymore. However if you really want to know, sears might have something on their website. Also, use google or other search engine and enter that model number, Who knows what you might find.
Try this google search (your own message came up too) http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=Model+106.628440&btnG=Google+Search&gbv=2
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On Jan 21, 4:27pm, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

with a older fridge energy use may skyrocket in hot weather, since the old fiberglass insulation isnt nearly as good modern closed cell insulation....
so in hot weather a freezer might be a energy piggie....... I can report around 15 years ago i replaced my 1953 fridge it was older than i was and saw a significant drop in electric use
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wrote:

That's not always true. I have an old 1940s refrigerator. I got a newer fridge from around the early to mid 2000s. The new one ran my electric bill up about $15 a month. Since that old one still worked, I saved it, so I went back to that one, and the bill came down that amount. The newer one does have a separate freezer and is larger, it also has the auto-defrost, which the old one didn't. I suppose that all adds up. I did eventually go back to the newer one just because I wanted the freezer, but still have the old one in the garage, which is there if I want to use it for a special occasion like a party.
I know the new on wont last even close to the age of that old one. Those things were built to last almost forever.
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