What size breaker and wire for a 5200W wall oven?

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On 9/22/2016 6:02 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Recently? I recall 110V at our house in Philadelphia, but that was 60 years ago. Going back to Westinghouse and his AC transformers I did read they were 110V output. With voltage drops at distances it could be low and thus, was boosted to a nominal 120V.
I am neither an electrical historian or engineer and I'm not going to search for cites. Nominal voltage today is 120 but can be lower with distance.
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On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 7:05:18 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That's all we're talking about, nominal voltage that the power company supplies today for the OP's oven and similar. Which again is why I asked if anyone has seen 110V in the USA and that's today, not in 1942. In my world it's 120/240V. And it does make a difference. If I saw 110V at my panel, I'd know something isn't right.
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On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 7:05:18 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Or to put it another way, if we went to the panel in the homes of the people who are talking about 110/220, would we measure close to that or would we really see 120/240? I'm guessing the latter.
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On 9/22/2016 8:02 PM, trader_4 wrote:

That would be my guess. Of course you may see a minor variation of a volt or two. I've seen 135 at my house but after reporting it, power company corrected it.
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On Thu, 22 Sep 2016 17:02:38 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

If you came to my house it would be 123.5 - 123.9
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net says...

This discussion is almost like trying to call a 2x4 whatever it is now. Over the years the 2x4 has gotten smaller as the time passes by. The voltage has gotten higher. If you were to go to a lumber yard would you ask for a 2x4 or maybe something like a 1 3/4 x 3 1/2 or whatever they are now ?
I have a voltmeter on one of the outlets at my house that stays on all the time. It has been calibrated with instruments that were at one time set to the NIST. It has ranged from a low of 118 to a high of 124 at the times I have seen it. Most of the time it is around 121 to 123 volts.
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On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 11:14:28 PM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Not even close to the same. 2x4's are called out as that in construction specs, though the actual dimensions are less. That is what they are referred to by standards, by sellers, by buyers, by people in the trade, who call them 2x4s but deliver the spec'd dimensions. You just saw the specs for the oven in this thread. It says 240V, not 220. Same with my oven when I put it in. The applicances one typically buys are spec'd at 120V, not 110V. And 120V is what the power company delivers, again to a spec. In other words the industry is using 240/120, mostly consistently and that is what you get when you measure at the panel, at least here. So, I don't see the need for the 110/220 confusion, it's just wrong.

Exactly. It's not in the neighborhood of 110V, because it's 120V power.
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On 09/23/2016 1:01 PM, trader_4 wrote: ...

Like many things, it (110V referral, that is) hangs around because at one time it _was_ the standard and not all the people who grew up with it died off at the time it was changed and, besides, they had kids and those kids learned to call it what their folks did, and that continues to this day...what the actual is isn't really the issue or the cause either one; it's simply historical precedent.
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On 09/22/2016 02:33 PM, TimR wrote:

IIRC, converting RMS to peak, you multiply by the square root of 2 (I don't know why it's THAT). 120 * SQR(2) = 169.7056275, which most people would call 170. I needed to know that recently when selecting a diode (1N4003) for making a light half brightness.

I recently was talking to an older friend who was talking about a submersible well pump that uses 220. I've always said 240 for that. Also, I have measured the voltage here, and have almost exactly 120 and 240.
BTW, when doing the above math I remember by first class in trigonometry. Most of the time, the teacher was walking around showing people what buttons to press on their calculators. Then they would be asked for something like "the SIN of 80" and some student would read all 8 or more digits of the answer. There was almost nothing said about what trigonometry IS or what it could be used for.
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When I took trig we did not have to worry about the buttons to push. It was either a slide rule or look them up in the CRC book.
For most electrical/electronic work 3 digits raised to whatever power of 10 was needed was about all that was ever needed. Most of the components were only 10 % few were 5 % and very few 1 % except for the test gear.
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Mark Lloyd was thinking very hard :

That is a major problem with the way mathematics is taught. Not only does it lead to incomplete understanding of it, it hides the usefulness of it.
When I was in school we weren't allowed to use calculators. One teacher I had would allow us to use a slide-rule if we knew how to work one.
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On 09/22/2016 10:04 AM, FromTheRafters wrote:

...

...
US spec's are given in ANSI C84.1-2011; you may be surprised to lean that first standardized effort by AIEE occurred as far back as 1898 the first joint meetings were held with the first accepted for publication in June, 1899. Revisions to it occurred in 1902, 1905 and 1911. The AC low voltage ratings at that time were established as 110,220,440 and 550 V.
I don't have the full history between then and the initial C84.1 adoption in (I believe) 1956 but as the Wikipedia article notes, there were intermediary periods of voltages between 110 and the current 120. Some history-type papers I've seen had data that by the late 1940s something like 90% of produced light bulbs were rated for 120V.
A link to the C84.1 Table 1 --<http://www.powerqualityworld.com/2011/04/ansi-c84-1-voltage-ratings-60-hertz.html
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dpb presented the following explanation :

I showed an old phonograph motor to my Electricity & Electronics instructor back in 1970. It had a clear plastic strap around it with 110VAC in black stamped on it. He told me it was about twenty years old because back in 1950 or so 110 volts was the norm.

That sounds about right.

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On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 5:45:02 AM UTC-4, Diesel wrote:

Who said it was? We aren't talking about history here, only what's in use today with the OP's oven.

I guess you think it's better to let people imply that 220V is a standard today in the USA, throw that into the mix of this oven, etc. Nothing personal, just that I think facts matter.
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Thu, 22 Sep 2016 14:37:00 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

You shouldn't make broad assumptions like that.
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On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 8:56:34 PM UTC-4, Diesel wrote:

Well what should one assume, when it's a 240V oven being connected to a 240V service and you start talking about 220V? Why confuse people who don't even know how to hook up their oven, by using a voltage convention that is wrong and does not exist?
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On Tue, 20 Sep 2016 16:29:11 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

I just bought a wall oven and the ones I looked at were listed for a 20a circuit. I ended up with a GE 27" convection oven that spec's out at 3.4kw. I think you will find the 40a circuits are for ranges tho. Wall ovens and cooktops are 20a or 30a.
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On Wednesday, September 21, 2016 at 2:05:38 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I was thinking from what I have hear. The house originally had a Jenn-Air combo oven and microwave wall unit. I recently replaced it with a Kitchenaid double 30" unit. Both of those were 40A, which was fortunate so I didn't have to rewire. I can see a single oven would use less, IDK what the OP has, but he is saying that in the manual it says a 40A circuit, while those other numbers he posted would seem to show 22A, so IDK.
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replying to trader_4, Tony944 wrote: Well I am not surprise that you never seen 220, however there are many places that power is must likely to be around 208 instead of 240 or 220. in most metropolitan area you are lucky to have even 208 I have been in places with power was low as 195 and customer complain why equipment is not working right "surprise".
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On Thu, 22 Sep 2016 04:14:01 +0000, Tony944

"In metropolitan areas" (apartments etc) you may actually be looking at 2 legs of a 120/208 3p service
If you have less than 216v (240 minus 10%) at your meter on a 120/240 1p service you should be calling the Public Utilities Commission or whomever regulates your PoCo. (if the power company will not do anything about it when you tell them)
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