what parts/tools/materials do I need to paint a bathroom?

Hi All,
I need to paint a bathroom. What tools/parts/materials do I need to purchase (paint is pretty obvious).
The shower is a one piece fiberglass shower. It leaves about two feed of sheet rock on its vertical sides to the sheet rock sealing. Where the sheet rock hits the fiberglass is pealing. So, include what i need the repair that too. Sandpaper? spackle?
Hopeless, -T
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Do yourself a favor and do a Google search on bathroom painting and bathroom wall repair.
You'll find videos galore and step by step instructions from multiple sources. I can't imagine that you won't learn everything you need to learn from them.
If you have any specific questions after viewing some of those videos, come on back.
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What derbydad said. Also get a dictionary,.sealing should be ceiling, pealing should be peeling, unless you are listening to bells.
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On 09/11/2012 01:31 PM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Oh now that is embarrassing!
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Todd:
I have no clue why your fiberglass tub/shower would be "peeling", and I have even less idea as to how to fix something like that.
But, believe it or not, the single biggest thing you need to do when painting a bathroom is to buy the RIGHT paint. That's because not all latex paints are equally resistant to moisture and humidity, and low priced paints will crack and peel under conditions of high humidity.
The advantage in buying a paint specifically made to be used in bathrooms is:
1. You're getting a binder resin that was chosen because of it's excellent resistance to moisture and humidity, so the bathroom will stay looking "newly painted" for a long time, and
2. Bathroom paints will have a powdered mildewcide added to them. This mildewcide is so highly soluble in water that even the high humidity on one side of the paint will cause the mildewcide to migrate through the paint film to the surface, where it will kill any mildew spores before they have a chance to grow.
I know of two paints specifically made for bathrooms. The first is Zinsser's "PermaWhite" available at Home Depot, and the second is simply called "Bath Paint" and is available at Sherwin Williams paint stores. I've been having a lot of problems with bubbles forming in Zinsser's Permawhite lately. I literally have to use an electric leaf blower to break the bubbles that form in that paint before it dries. So, in this post I'm gonna warn people away from Zinsser's and suggest you buy some Sherwin Williams Bath Paint.
--
nestork


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I believe that you interpreted his statement incorrectly.
"Where the sheet rock hits the fiberglass is pealing."
It's not the fiberglass that's peeling, it's the junction where the 2 materials meet.
I need to tackle the same problem in one of my bathrooms. Along the top edge of one of the fiberglass walls you can see about a 1/2" of greenboard. The paint has peeled off in that area. It may have peeled off of the caulk since the paint and primer are both gone.

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On 9/11/2012 10:10 PM, nestork wrote:

I disagree. The "right" paint doesn't need to be special for baths. The prep is critical and will usually let any kind of paint stand up to conditions....I've painted kitchens and baths quite a few times. One big problem in both is that moisture condenses and runs down walls/doors/trim and then wicks into unsealed surfaces. Ever see bathroom doors with wood cracking and expanding along the bottom? Same along lower edge of baseboards?

Decent paint applied after careful prep will keep out moisture. I've never seen a painted wall with damage from moisture seeping THROUGH an intact paint film. Of course, if the structure is closed up and not maintained for a long time, mildew might eventually eat through paint.

I haven't used the paint you mention, but bubbling can be reduced by thinning (my experience with other paints and varnishes).
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On 09/11/2012 07:10 PM, nestork wrote:

Not the fiberglass, the paint on the sheet rock when it contacts the top of the tub. It is pretty messed up too. I figure sand paper and dig out any holes and fill the with spackle.
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Todd;2925837 Wrote: > On 09/11/2012 07:10 PM, nestork wrote:-

> I

Todd:
Scrape off any loose and peeling paint.
If any surface paper comes off with the paint, then use the self adhesive fiberglass mesh drywall joint tape over those areas. Then, paint that mesh with white wood glue diluted with water to make it into a paintable consistancy. As the glue dries, it'll bond the fiberglass mesh to the paper.
If you have any areas where the paper is missing and the gypsum core is crumbling, remove the gypsum, fill with drywall joint compound, sand smooth, remove any dust and then use the fiberglass mesh over that.
THEN, prime and paint over your repairs with a paint specifically made to be used in bathrooms.
--
nestork


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Didn't you leave out the step about caulking the seam between the top of the fiberglass wall and the wall board?
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I've been fighting that battle for 15 years, a crack always developes along the junction between theplastic liner and the sheetrock. I think it may have to do with the differing rates of expansion of the two materials is more than the caulk can handle.
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On 9/11/2012 4:02 PM, Todd wrote:

Scraper or putty knife (p.k. is more flexible) Spackle Latex primer Semi-gloss paint Paintable caulk Small foam paint roller 2" paint brush (not natural bristle); buy a good one if you plan to ever paint again Something to catch the drips; plastic sheet, newspaper, etc. Stirring stick for paint Rags Spit (for smoothing the caulk)
Gently scrape the loose paint. Patch the peeled spots with spackle, let dry, smooth with sandpaper or damp sponge. Apply primer, let dry. Carefully apply caulk along join of shower and sheet rock; let it set. Paint. I'm thinking that if you can't even come up with your own shopping list for painting a bathroom, you are going to be stuck at applying the caulk. If you seemed a tad more experienced, I'd recomment alkyd semi-gloss paint for the bath...kinda' icky to clean up. Let us know how it goes! You in college?
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On 09/12/2012 04:15 AM, Norminn wrote:

Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you for sharing your knowledge with me. Don't care much for how to videos as they tend to leave stuff out. ("What idiot would not know to do this?" Well this idiot wouldn't.)
College was a long, long time ago.
Have to use Safe Coat, due to chemical sensitivities. Was going to use their eggshell outdoor paint.
http://www.afmsafecoat.com /
AFM suggested M1 as a safe anti fungal. But still looking for the MSDS. If any, and I mean any, human reaction, it is out.
Again, thank you so much, -T
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On 09/12/2012 12:03 PM, Todd wrote:

Looked at MSDS for M1. Yikes! This stuff is toxic. Don't think even healthy people should risk it.
In the mean time, found
http://www.ecoprotectiveproducts.com/bioshield.html
which uses silver nano particles. Completely non-toxic to humans. Called the company: really nice people too.
-T
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particles fifty years ago...........
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On 9/12/2012 3:03 PM, Todd wrote:

Chemical sensitivities are nasty things....ya' never know what's going to make your eyes puff up :o) In the realm of anti-fungals, it may be safer and more productive to focus on ventillation rather than worrying about paint additives. The reason being: adding a.f. to paint doesn't change YOUR environment, as it allows the air and unpainted surfaces to grow stuff. Part of the reason I like semi-gloss paint for baths (and in the warm south, it is almost the universal choice for exterior paints) is that it is slicker so grubby stuff doesn't cling to it and grow. After we added a timer to our bath exhaust fan and started leaving the shower curtain open on both sides when not in use, the shower didn't grow any more mildew. Wiping down the shower after use (for the very ambitious) would help. People with chem. sensitivities are more likely, I expect, to be troubled with mold/mildew. I'm really a doubter about the anti-fungal additives because mildew just doesn't grow on clean, dry surfaces very well:o) I discovered on my last paint-the-bathroom job that the walls and ceiling stay wet for a surprisingly long time (2-3 hours) after a shower with no fan use.
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On 09/15/2012 04:53 AM, Norminn wrote:

Very good advice. Thank you. As far as anti-fungals, I have found this paint:
http://www.ecoprotectiveproducts.com/bioshield.html
which uses silver nano particles. Completely non-toxic to humans. Called the company: really nice people too.
And, keep it dry, keep it dry, keep it dry ...
-T
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The only tools you need is a telephone and your yellow pages phone book. Look under "P" for painters.
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