What home repairs are you most Afraid of?

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On 12/06/2015 12:28 PM, Muggles wrote:

I took a pass at bead work at one time. My conclusion was Indian women had a lot of time on their hands and excellent eye sight. The experiment lasted about as long as when my mother tried petit point.
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On 12/6/2015 3:17 PM, rbowman wrote:

For a time I really loved doing that sort of work, but a few years of doing it kind of got to my upper back and I had to quit because of the pain it caused.
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Maggie

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On 12/5/2015 1:29 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Your stitches aren't following a single thread-line in the fabric. I.e., the fabric can be thought of as a grid. But, your stitching isn't perfectly *aligned* with that grid. So, the structure in the fabric (i.e., which "horizontal" threads you're crossing along with which "vertical" threads you're crossing) biases the stitch you're making.
You also need to ensure top and bottom thread tensions are balanced.
A zig-zag stitch is usually more "accommodating" than a straight line stitch; it has some elasticity in its structure. (and, moves each penetration of the fabric farther apart for a given amount of "forward motion"; sort of like walking/wobbling with legs wide vs. taking baby steps to make the same forward motion)

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On 12/5/2015 3:01 PM, Don Y wrote:

The fabric is also used and more than likely has random straight and cross grain stretches already.

A walking zig-zag is more accommodating than a straight or a normal zig-zag stitch, and should be used for materials that have an expected stretch to it. A zig-zag stitch on a trampoline material is only good for flat felled seams, or seams that fray because of the open weave of the material.

--
Maggie

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Per Muggles:

Is Spandex the same thing as Lycra ?
I always thought that the guy who invented Lycra should get a Nobel prize.
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Pete Cresswell

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On 12/5/2015 2:06 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

According to wikipedia it's the same thing.

ditto! I loved it when they made stretch jeans!
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Maggie

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On 12/05/2015 01:06 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Or shot at dawn. It all depends.
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On 12/05/2015 12:21 PM, Muggles wrote:

Is that the same as lycra? As in what your well undressed nerd on a $2500 road bike wears?
http://road.cc/content/news/130207-columbian-ladies-giro-toscana-team-show-little-more-they-bargained-revealing
Worked great for the Columbian team.
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On 12/5/2015 6:42 PM, rbowman wrote:

It could be. There are lots of different versions of spandex.
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Per rbowman:

Why cyclists wear black: https://picasaweb.google.com/108149798664924808733/Humor#6009321546127227042
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Pete Cresswell

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On 12/05/2015 08:23 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Wise choice. If nothing else the red ones look a bit uncomfortable. There has been some discussion whether extended bicycling can cause erectile dysfunction; shrink wrapping your Eier can't help.
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On 12/04/2015 08:13 PM, Don Y wrote:

That's about how my conversations go. The fatal one is "What are you going to use it for?" "You don't want to know." is the most accurate if not the politest response.
That's often how it goes in the hardware store or Home Depot unless I'm looking for a specific item that will be used for its intended purpose.
The funniest one I've see was a young Goth couple looking at leashes and collars at the ranch supply store. The clerk was really trying to be helpful but he was in way over his head. "How big is the dog?" "There isn't a dog."
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On 12/5/2015 12:34 PM, rbowman wrote:

Yeah, I get that at the hardware store when I'm trying to *imagine* a device to solve one of my technical needs. "Hmmm... do I spend 15 minutes trying to educate this sales person as to my actual need so they *might* be able to make some suggestions? Or, when they ask if I need any help, should I just reply, 'No thanks! I'm all set!'"

When you can rattle off very *specific* requirements -- but can't put a name on the item (or, an application to which THEY would relate), it tends to leave them stupified. I.e., "clearly *he* knows what he's looking for (in detail!) so why can't I figure out what he wants??"

He/she should have matter-of-factly turned to his/her mate, wrapped their hands around their neck to gauge the size; then, removed them and said "About this big..." (knowing that the salesperson had watched the entire event!).
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On 12/5/2015 3:12 PM, Don Y wrote:

I'm also afraid of hardware store drones. One time I was looking through the aisle, the drone tried to stay one step ahead of me, and read all the shelf tags out loud. Really destroyed my ability to think. I tried to, politely, ask him to go else where.
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On 12/4/2015 9:01 PM, rbowman wrote:

LOL Yeah, us seamstresses have weapons - will travel!
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Maggie

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On 12/04/2015 09:49 PM, Muggles wrote:

The sewing machine place is the scary one. My mother had a Singer she used quite a bit but as complex as it got was a button hole attachment. Some of the new ones cost more than my car and have more computing power than the machine I'm typing on. I always worry if I get too close I'll have a monogram embroidered on my left butt cheek in all the colors of the rainbow.
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On 12/5/2015 1:37 PM, rbowman wrote:

Mine is a Pfaff, and it's one of those that has a zillion stitches with programming capabilities. I made a career out of it for many years as a professional seamstress and made all sorts of things with it. I even worked for the ballet for several seasons as their principle dancer seamstress. I was glad when I got out of that, though, because I don't have the steady hands that I used to have to do all the plateau embroidery and cut work. That was career #4, I think!
--
Maggie

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On 12/05/2015 01:06 PM, Muggles wrote:

Okay, google just let me down. What's 'plateau embroidery'? My grandmother did something that involved hoops and about 1000 little skeins of yarn, thread, or whatever it's called.
One of my aunts was a seamstress for a while and tended to have a mouthful of straight pins rather than using a pin cushion. She looked up one day and one of the ankle biters was emulating her. I don't think she breathed until the kid was disarmed.
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On 12/5/2015 6:55 PM, rbowman wrote:

When the principle ballerina wears a tutu it can be decorated by a top flat portion that's attached to the top of the tutu. Part of what I did was take the ballet designers pattern and create the tutu plateau which could include intricate sewing patterns (sometimes zig-zagged) using invisible thread and then cut outs in the pattern, and then glittery jewels and beads were sew on to decorate the plateau.

LOL I always used a pin cushion, and supplemented with a wand magnet.
--
Maggie

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On 12/05/2015 06:46 PM, Muggles wrote:

I'm so far out of my league... I did know a woman who worked for a fashion house that specialized in stripper costumes. One of their hottest sellers was a pubic hair wig for the performers in Boston's Combat Zone. Is that anything like a tutu?
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