What happens if you put 75 watt bulb in a 60 watt fixture

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Likely it was in the "Residential Electrical System Aging Research Report" published by UL a few years ago. I think it's on line.
Tomsic
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IOW, you can't cite an example. We knew that.
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On Friday, January 25, 2013 12:56:39 AM UTC-5, Joe Mastroianni wrote:

I'd say it's 25% over the recommended maximun. But probably not a good idea.
Art Harris
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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 07:15:46 -0800, Art Harris wrote:

You are correct. I phrased it incorrectly.
75 Watts is 25% over the maximum of 60 Watts, or, 125% of the maximum.
Seems to me, 25% is within the safety zone of ???? (what is the safety zone).
I find it hard to believe the safety zone is zero.
I suspect it's more like double the rating (i.e., it's probably more like 60 x 2 = 120 Watts) but I'm just guessing.
That's why I asked.
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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 15:28:24 +0000 (UTC), Joe Mastroianni

You're not the brightest light on the tree are you?
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A couple of posters shared their experience.
I find fixtures even with the correct bulb age over time, parts get brittle and start to fall apart.
I definitely would not put a 75W incandescent in a 60W fixture. The risk is no where near the gain. The risk is that your house burns down and the insurance company denies your claim.
Find a CFL that doesn't stick out so much or go for the LED.
--
Dan Espen

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Oh, good grief, here we go again. The insurance scare stories at it again. Every time this comes up, I've asked where all the examples of this kind of thing happening are. Where are those denied claims? There are what 100 million homes in the USA? If insurance companies were actually denying claims for things like that, it should be easy to come up with examples. I mean if they are gonna deny that, then they might as well deny a claim for the house burning down because you left a pot burning on the stove. Or because you smoked in bed.
So, example please?

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Right, so trader says the insurance company won't deny your claim.
Nothing to worry about except the fire then...
--
Dan Espen

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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 13:51:27 -0500, Dan Espen wrote:

I personally doubt it will cause a fire - but I must say that I'm not sure (which is why I asked).
Nobody cited anything specific - and - well I guess the onus is on me to figure out what the ratings actually mean.
I presume (but this is an assumption), that a 60 Watt rating means it can handle at least double that forever - but I am clear that this is just an assumption.
I hear all the houses-burning-down scare stories - and I don't deny that (because I don't know) but without any facts to back them up - that assumption is based on similar logic to mine (i.e., wild eyed guesses).
Of course, the house-burning-down is a MUCH SAFER assumption - so I'm not poo pooing it - I'm just saying that nobody who said the house would burn down has shown any proof of it actually happening even once. Of course, with 150 million homes (or so) in the US, I'm sure houses burn down from all sorts of things - but I can say I've got a handful of these lamps, all running the 75 Watt Halogen Par-something bulb - and the only thing I see so far is that they do get rather hot.
Anyway - I'll stick to the rating being half the actual limit until/ unless someone shows proof otherwise. BTW, I don't disagree with the statement that the thing will slowly deteriorate with higher heat - but again, nobody showed proof so that's just an assumption also.
Still - it was a good idea to change out the plastic socket for ceramic and to move the switch to the cord - so these I will explore.
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Well, what *would* you expect to happen when insulation that has been dried up and embrittled by excessive heat flakes off of the wires, resulting in electrical arcs between the exposed conductors?

I certainly cited something specific -- what happened to the kitchen light fixtures in my house as a result of the previous owners doing *exactly* what you are proposing to do: put 75W bulbs in fixtures clearly labelled "60W max".
Did you not read that? Or did you just decide to ignore it?

What on earth would make you think that? "60W max" means what it says. The fixture wires WILL be damaged if you use 75W bulbs.

You know, I'm beginning to think that you're not very smart.
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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 23:27:58 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

Let's be careful with the accusations. It took you long enough to figure out he's got one wheel in the sand. :-)
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On 01-25-2013 18:27, Doug Miller wrote:

I would expect a circuit breaker to trip.
However, if arcing causes a speck of hot metal to pop out onto a tissue .....
--
Wes Groleau

Ostracism: A practice of sticking your head in the sand.
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I would expect an *arc fault* breaker to trip. But a standard circuit breaker may or may not trip -- it depends on how much current the arc is carrying.
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my bedroom light failed this way. I awoke to go to bathroom and realized my pillow must of fallen to the floor so i turned the light switch on as i walked out of room, figuring my eyes would have time to adust by the time i got back......
however i saw a super brite flash, turned the switch off and didnt get any more sleep.
the 50 year old wires insulation was crumbling and started arcing to the fixture, the breaker didnt trip but a nice shower of sparks came down on the bed.....
needless to say i replaced all the fixtures in the house most were showing the same detoriation
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On 01/25/2013 05:37 PM, Joe Mastroianni wrote:

Your house, do what you want. We don't really give a fuck!
Consider this though. The fixture was tested and the highest rating after testing was 60 watts. If the manufacturer could have squeezed another 15 watts out of the fixture, they would have.
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On 1/25/2013 4:37 PM, Joe Mastroianni wrote:

Might not cause a fire.
Might just cause insulation failure with contact from wire to metal parts. You might only electrocute someone.
Or you might just have the fixture fail in a relatively short time.

Good idea.
And another great idea - the circuit rating is actually "half the actual limit". You can replace the 15A breaker on the circuit with a 30A one. Nothing will happen. (Where is the proof otherwise.)
And if fixture insulation fails and wires short you might not even have the inconvenience of a breaker trip.

An electrician has "seen many overheated light fixtures". A couple other people have seen damage from overlamping. I have seen damage.
But go ahead. You may win the Darwin Award.
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Before you adopt your made-up "half the actual limit" idea, why don't you read the UL Standard on the subject which details the test procedures and assumptions that UL uses. It's UL Standard 8750 and applies to permanently-mounted light fixtures. Any electrical inspector will have a copy or you can buy it from UL or CSA since it's harmonized with Canada too.
Tomsic
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8750.
Tomsic
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On Sat, 26 Jan 2013 11:15:29 -0500, Tomsic wrote:

I found that 293-page "Luminaires UL 1598" standard here: http://file.yizimg.com/173503/20061028163262442236757.pdf
Looking for the wattage-rating test procedure, I scroll through to page 138 where section 14 seems to cover temperature limits. Section 14.1.3 Rated wattage of lamp used Table 14.1.2 Maximum temperature limits
Reading that section over and over, I am not illuminated as to what excess safety limits are in a 60 Watt rating. I can see it has everything to do with temperature - since Clause 19.14.1.3 appears to be all about the temperature test box; but I can't really tell what the safety factor is from reading this document.
Does someone with more acumen than I have insight into where in that document it spells out the safety factor inherent in the standard?
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[lots of irrelevant stuff snipped]

You've been trying for a couple days now to get somebody to tell you it's OK to put a 75W bulb in a fixture labelled 60W max. You obviously refuse to accept the idea that the rating is there for a reason, and you obviously intend on doing what you want to do, regardless of the UL listing, regardless of all the advice you have received to the contrary -- so why don't you just shut up and go do it?
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