What happens if you put 75 watt bulb in a 60 watt fixture

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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 05:57:44 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

I bet somewhere in my home, I have one so better come and get me. But please bring food and a Latte' when you come so I can eat and drink well before I go into the slammer.
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On Friday, January 25, 2013 6:57:44 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

I am so effing sick of this extremist rhetoric.
They're not coming to take your light bulbs any more than they're coming to take your guns. Our Federal government is too broke and mired down in its own dysfunction to go around kicking in doors and smashing light bulbs, Elliott Ness style.
What's banned is the manufacture and importation of 75 watt incandescent bulbs, except for special-use types (i.e. rough service, floodlights, etc.).
You can still use existing 75 Watt bulbs. You can still buy them as long as supplies hold out. A couple boxes of them will likely last you the rest of your life, and your kids will be used to CFL's so they won't care.
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On Jan 25, 3:33 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Then if the govt is so broke and mired down, why is the focus of the White House and the libs more gun control instead of spending cuts to reduce the budget? Polls consistently show that people put creating jobs and reducing the deficit as top priorities. Banning assault weapons are way down the list. But it's a nice diversion courtesy of you libs.
And if they aren't taking your guns, why did NY state just pass a law that makes the standard magazines sold with probably 90% of the legal pistols for self defense illegal? Not only are sales banned of any magazine greater than 7 rounds, but legal owners have a year to get rid of them. Before that, NY banned mags greater than 10 rounds. Now it's 7. See a trend here and why it's obvious what you libs are up to?


Wow, you can still buy them until they run out.... How generous of you libs. I'm sure you'll do the same thing when you ban fatty foods and have us all eating soylent green.
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Yeah, NYC banned soft drinks over a certain size. Next, the McBurger ban, and then who knows. But scientists have shown that flu shots are good for us, it's the mercury. And Obama was born in Hawaii. And, Thalidomide is good for pregnant womens nausea.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Wow, you can still buy them until they run out.... How generous of you libs. I'm sure you'll do the same thing when you ban fatty foods and have us all eating soylent green.
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On 01/25/2013 04:59 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

take your guns. Our Federal government is too broke and mired down in its own dysfunction to go around kicking in doors and smashing light bulbs, Elliott Ness style.

The cost of reasonable regulations will be far less than the societal cost of scores of dead children.
Polls consistently show that people

supplies hold out. A couple boxes of them will likely last you the rest of your life, and your kids will be used to CFL's so they won't care.

Fanaticism abounds on the Right.
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Right on. The rants about government control are more than tiresome. In the case of light bulbs, the legislation to phase them out started with the energy advocates. They went to the Congressional staff of the House and Senate Energy Committees and said that they wanted to regulate certain inefficient light bulbs so that more efficient bulbs would be used. The advocates had plenty of support - some utilities, other energy conservation groups and lots of people who thought saving energy is a good idea. They organized and took their message to Congress. Then Congress held hearings, asked folks, including the light bulb manufacturers, what they thought and the legislation was written. It must have been a fair process because no one was happy with the results. I haven't found anyone involved who got what they wanted. Then, the legislation went to Congress, was approved by both houses and signed by President Bush in 2007. It kicked in 5 years later - in 2012 with the phase out of the 100 watt bulb - and all of a sudden the critics woke up and started complaining about government control. Now, with the free market working, more bulb choices available than ever before at about any price range that you want and with energy being saved with all of them, I wonder just what the fuss is about and where critics were when the laws were being debated.
Tomsic
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B-b-b-but communism, Obama, they're taking our rights away!
I say, screw in those curly Q, mind reading, light bulbs and surrender. After a few years you won't even notice.
http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t &2771 http://gold-silver.us/forum/showthread.php?46738-CFL-Bulb-Conspiracy http://www.conspiracyplanet.com/channel.cfm?channelidF&contentid €95&page=2
--
Dan Espen

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On 01/25/2013 03:33 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'll never get used to CFLs, they suck on several levels. The ONLY thing that they have going for them is that they are more efficient than incandescents.
The good news is that by the time recently-purchased CFLs start going, LEDs will be widely available and affordable.
I'm using a 9W LED bulb in my bedside lamp; it was on sale at Lowe's for $10 or so last year. I have no complaints with it at all, although I don't remember seeing CRI specs on the packaging (one place where CFLs tend to fall down unless you get expensive ones that you're not likely to find in retail stores.) It is dimmable, which I've yet to see acceptably demonstrated with CFLs even ones advertised as such. It also is at full brightness in a second or so as opposed to a minute or so for a CFL. If brighter LED bulbs were available for a similar price (and I expect that they will be in a few years) I'd see no need to ever buy another CFL again.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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You warning for the fool came too late. He's been drawn and quartered, keel hauled, burned at the stake and hung until dead for his hanous disregard for the law.
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On 11/10/2013 4:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

And the Sisters of the Black and White Penguin Order beat his knuckles with a ruler until he recited ten Mail Hairys.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
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I'm not seeing the original post. Based on the question in the subject line:
Maybe it would work fine, or maybe it would overheat and burn something.
Why risk it? Use a CFL bulb or an LED bulb that is equivalent to 75W would give you both the lumens you want, and plenty of safety margin.
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A lot. When we bought our current home, I had to replace all of the light fixtures in the kitchen because the previous owners had done exactly that: put 75W bulbs in fixtures that were labeled "60W max". When I took the fixtures down to paint the ceiling, I discovered that the excess heat had made the insulation on the fixture wires brittle and hard to the point of cracking and falling off of the conductors. One fixture had an inch and a half of uninsulated wire.
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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 11:58:14 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

How did you fix that? Just curious.
I've run across many like that, and I always tried to replace the whole cable. But thats not always possible without ripping apart the whole house. Other times I had to put an extra box inh the attic and run a few feet of new wire. I've seen lots of guys just tape up those cracked wires, but that's not the best fix. I found another method. Put heat shrink tubing ovet the wires. That works wonders and is easy to do. However if it's the old BX and the wires are cracked right up to the metal sheath, you will likely have problems. You're stuck replacing them.
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*I have seen many overheated light fixtures over the years. Most of them don't start a fire unless they are in close proximity to combustible materials such as curtains or furniture. What usually happens over time is the lamp socket get brittle and cracks, the insulation on the wire gets brittle and cracks and eventually sparks fly out and then I get a call.
The 75 watt bulb that you have in the light looks as though it might be a halogen bulb which gets very hot. I would try a 50 watt PAR 20 bulb. It is a small halogen floodlight (Actually they come in flood or spot) and puts out about the same amount of light as a 75 watt incandescent bulb.
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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 07:45:21 -0500, John Grabowski wrote:

It 'is' a halogen, and it 'does' get very hot.
And, I guess, lumens are all I want (and compact size so it doesn't stick out of the housing) - so that's a good idea if it works.
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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 05:56:39 +0000 (UTC), Joe Mastroianni wrote:

Chicago Fire.
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If the desk lamp also has a UL or CSA sticker, then a 60 watt bulb was used to test and approve the fixture for electrical and fire safety. Using a 75 watt bulb voids that listing. If you were to have a fire that was traced to the desk lamp and if the fire inspector determined that you had over-wattaged the lamp, then your fire insurance could be disallowed. That's not very likely, of course, but it has happened. As others have mentioned, using a 50 watt halogen PAR 20 might work for you as will using a CFL or LED bulb, but compare the light output values (lumens). Don't go just by the "wattage equivalent" charts.
Tomsic
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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 09:32:46 -0500, Tomsic wrote:

Makes sense. But doesn't answer the question.
Seems to me bridges are designed to hold twice what they say they can hold. Elevators are the same. A room placard that says a ballroom can legally hold 100 people can 'fit' twice that easily. Speed limits are set but we routinely go twice the speed limit safely (maybe not twice - but the point is the same). A rope rated for 100 pounds can handle ten times that. etc.
It seems, to me, a lamp rated at 60 watts must have been tested at twice that (or some large number like that) in order to get the rating.
At least that's how 'other' ratings seem to be done.
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It isn't that a slightly higher wattage bulb will immediately cause a fire or electrical hazard. That will happen over time due to deteriorated wiring, insulation or structural parts. There are tolerances and variations that are considered in the UL/CSA tests; but it's a pass/fail system so electrical inspectors and fire safety people know what to do.
Tomsic
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Bullshit called.

Citation needed.
As others have

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