Weight of truck on concrete sidewalk

Page 2 of 2  


One unit burned, four had heavy smoke damage - those are not in question. He's asking about what to do about the marginal smoke areas. I gave him an option. So far you've told him to totally gut the place and replace all of the wiring and plumbing - that the fire was an 'opportunity'. He redid the apartments in 2007 and you want him to gut the place.
You're really good at spending other people's money on the intertubes, but the advice...not so much.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Steel I dont see as an option. its to heavy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 10 May 2011 18:39:42 -0700 (PDT), ransley

Too heavy for what? It will spread the load, preventing sidewalk or even lawn damage if a large enough piece is used.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That would work real well, but a 1000lb sheet woud not be feasible in several ways, or maybe its an idea, im learning a bit here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Because busy fighting a bush fire, we did not bother about this when the water truck (est. 10 tons) parked right over the septic tank tile bed. The tile bed worked OK for the next dozen years we lived there, but the dip in the lawn lasted all that time as well.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

@Ransley:
Is the dump truck based on a pick-up chassis or is it a medium-duty 26,000 lb GVWR non-CDL/33,000 lb.+ GVWR CDL chassis ?
A pick-up truck would be fine on the sidewalk even fully loaded, but a 33,000 lb + commercial vehicle might crack the sidewalk even with plywood down...
The question you have to ask yourself is how have people moved in to your apartment building in the past ? Have moving trucks the same size as the contractor's dump truck been parked in the area before ?
There is *nothing* you can do to save your lawn area, it will have to be repaired after the work is done, either from parking on it to do the work required to rehab your building or from the people walking on it to do the work/staging materials there during the work... Such is just a casualty of the construction zone...
As for parking in the street, all that will do is add more time to job at hand and potentially require some form of permit to block off an area in the street to make loading the debris into the truck safer and less of a risk to the public walking/driving by on the street...
Better to contain any debris or spills or 'oops i missed the truck' moments on your land where you and your contractor can deal with them and properly load the trucks for transit without being blamed for any debris on the street or creating a hazardous condition in the road if old nails or glass make it onto the road near where you were loading...
Your job site could get shut down and you would be billed for the expense of the street cleaning if the AHJ wanted to make an issue out of something...
Good Luck with your reconstruction...
~~ Evan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes a simple job gets confusing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is a city, Chicago Illinois, its totaly different from country or a non code area. Hey Harry hoes the solar going, my family was from Tisbury.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nonsense.
I used to build swimming pools. Gunite rigs, slam-bangers, bobcats, dump trucks, cement trucks, plumbing trucks, etc. We all worked from the street unless specifically allowed closer access. The only thing that ever had to cross a sidewalk was the bobcat and a small caterpillar that excavated the hole and it was small enough to not break up the sidewalk unless it was poorly built. If the buyer wants to pay for new sidewalk, fine by me, but we never operated assuming that was an option.
We subbed the deck work and they called in cement mixers, but I never saw much of that. I do know many cement mixers had huge balloon tires that help distribute the weight.
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 10 May 2011 05:49:06 -0700, ransley wrote:

Only way to do it is to spread out the load with steel plating like the road dept uses. The contractor should be aware of this. Make sure he is and have it written that any damage is their responsibility.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.