Transponder car key

Had a big scare today - thought I locked my only remaining car key in the t runk.*
Called road service - they said would have to send locksmith to make key in situ. Insurance would cover only $100 of... they were checking. Long story short , the key did turn up; it hadn't been locked in trunk.
(I HAD an extra door/trunk key but it disappeared along with my wallet. Do n't ask! Three days on the phone & computer, and probably didn't get all ID replaced.)
Learned that one can -- I hope -- get new **ignition key** made by any lock smith. Transponder. Never heard of it. Somehow they get the info from my key's chip to the blank. Price sounds much cheaper than the dealer, who qu oted me $265 years ago when I lost the remote.
****Any input on transponder key from locksmith rather than dealer?*****
TIA
HB
* (Couldn't find way to remove back seat to get into trunk. Later went on- line. Yes, it can be done (older car) but w/tools, time, and skill. None a vailable at the site today!)
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On 11/25/13 3:52 AM, Higgs Boson wrote:

at my local one saying so. A quick look online brought up this link: http://wedo.hillmangroup.com/c...urity
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I wanted an extra key for my 2004 Camry, and Ace was able to make one. Their equipment was able to read the Toyota key and transfer the program to the new key.
It is different from the Toyota key, in that the Toyota key can not be re-programmed. The Ace key is larger and has a small lithium battery inside to maintain its memory.
I think that is the basis for the unusually high cost of a replacement from the manufacturer, as their replacement key is individually made. I surmise that a chip is burned and then molded into the body of a new key.
Ace also sells and installs replacement batteries.
Fred
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<... quote of other article snipped...>

On many systems the keys are random and the car's computer is programmed to accept the key. Originally this was the most common implementation. Somewhere along the way key manufacturers developed keys that could mimic and existing key that the computer was already programmed to recognize.
There are several methods in use by the different auto manufacturers now. Can't really generalize about more than one specific brand.
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On 11/25/2013 4:52 AM, Higgs Boson wrote:

turn up; it hadn't been locked in trunk.

Three days on the phone & computer, and probably didn't get all ID replaced.)

Transponder. Never heard of it. Somehow they get the info from my key's chip to the blank. Price sounds much cheaper than the dealer, who quoted me $265 years ago when I lost the remote.

(older car) but w/tools, time, and skill. None available at the site today!)

I'm a locksmith with 25+ years experience. I don't do transponder keys, and seldom do any work with VATS or PASS keys.
Call several locksmiths, look in phone book yellow pages. In my area, there's one guy who does this kind of work. He's not in the phone book.
"Do you cut transponder keys for <year> <vehicle>? Can you recommend someone who does?"
You'll find someone, after several calls.
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Christopher A. Young
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my chevy venture has a transponder key thats only necessary for the ignition.
so i had a hardware store make a few cheap regular keys for door locks, which helped when me and friends went to the rodgers ohio flea market.....
everyone had acess to the vehicle.
be careful if your down to just one key. i was told if the last one was lost or damaged, the vehicle would need towed to the dealership and put on their computer so a new key could be used.
u tube has ome videos of how to bypass the chipped key feature but i have been reluctant to mess with it for fear i will cause other electronic troubles
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What Bob says below, with a couple additions.
Locksmiths are cheaper than the dealer for the same reason everyone is cheaper than the dealer for anything they do that the dealer does.
wrote:

Same with 2000 Toyota. I presume that's true of all cars. The goal was to prevent car theft, not breaking into trunks.
Not only that, if you ever break a transponder key, you can cut an ignition key from a plain blank, at any hardware store, use that key to turn the lock while you hold the head of the broken transponder key near the keyhole, maybe just on the same keyring, and the car will start.
I thought I could fool the ignition in the same way Remote Start devices do, but they require a separate transponder key, taped to the transponder receiver. Right out of their instructions, no matter the make of car iirc. After you do that, the remote will start your car but so will any key, transponder or non-transponder. Of course thieves won't know that, so maybe you'll be okay. I don't know what a car insurance company would say if you put in a claim for a stolen car.

Yes, a key cut on any blank for -- is it $2.00 now -- will do everything but start the car.
Very good if you lock your fancy key in the car.

That's what I hear too. Much more expensive.

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<...snipped...>

On many vehicles there is procedure that can be done without any special equipment to program the car to accept a new key, if 2 working keys are available also. Details vary between makes and models, sometimes it's in the owner's manual, other times you can find it online.
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The non-remote (no button) transponder keys work fine regardless of the source, assuming they are coded with the vehicle keycode. The keycode is usually in the paperwork you receive when the vehicle is purchased, but is also available for the dealer, usually at no charge. You should be asked to show proof of ownership of the vehicle and the VIN number.
There are a couple of things to keep in mind: First is that the key has to be mated with the vehicle. They easiiest way to do this is with two other keys that are already mated to the vehicle. If you don't have two good keys, the vehicle has to be programmed. The locksmith or dealer may or may not charge for that.
The other thing is the vehicle alarm system (if it has one). If the vehicle alarm was set automatically by using a key remote, and then you unlock the vehicle with the non-remote key, the alarm may go off until the non-remote key is inserted in the ignition and turned on.
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On 11/25/2013 3:52 AM, Higgs Boson wrote:

I bought a spare transponder key blank for my make/model off ebay for ten bucks. Took it to a locksmith and had it cut - another ten bucks. Then I programmed the key to match my ignition. The directions on how to do that are in the owner's manual, and can also be found online for your particular make/model.
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I have an older Chevy Lumina.
These have a "chip" in the ignition key, but it's not programmed. It's just a resistor of a specific value, and there are a limited number. You can measure with an ohmeter and a local locksmith can cut one and add the chip.
But it won't open the doors or trunk, that's a separate key.
Same car needs the engine moved to change the spark plugs.
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wrote:

I've given up any plans to change 3 of the 6 plugs on my 2000 Toyota Solara. I don't know how it is supposed to be done, maybe as you say. It probably won't matter since I didn't change plugs on my LeBarons either.
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said they wouldn't do it...it might not work but I could buy one from them for $80. Told them to FO and went across the street to Home Depot and got it cut. When I asked how much the girl said "no charge, we only charge for the key if you buy from us, not for cutting". Came home and programmed new key as per owners manual instructions and was up & running in 5 minutes. Only thing is you need 2 functioning transponder keys to be able to program a new key in car ignition.
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Very interesting. Other than this, however, I still think Ace is a much better hardware store than HD or Lowes.
Needed square U-bolts. HD had not one. Ace had 14 sizes. Needed a long #1 Phillips. HD had not one. Ace had two brands. Need PC-70. HD had only the smallest size. Ace had that and the biggger size, the one I wanted.
I've checked several times over years and HD still doesn't have the three things it didn't have when I needed them.
Wire, and screening on a roll, cut what you need, Ace has that.
There is no Ace really near me and the one I go too is pretty big, maybe bigger than the other two around here.

Wow. I wonder if every store is like this. I'll tell my friend who needs a key cut.

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at ace than at a big box store. I was at an ace (a different one) a few years ago to rent a rug doctor and the sole cashier was arguing with the person in front of me in line about some business account. After 5 minutes the person stormed off and I let an elderly lady behind me go 1st as she was only buying a paint brush. After she was done I was told by the cashier I had to also let the 5 people that had lined up behind me go ahead of me also. Headed to Menards. After this and my key experience of late I'm done with ace.
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