Tool recommendation: Fastening to concrete block walls

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wrote:

My problem with Tapcon is it is always hit and miss for me. I use a regular corded hammer drill (which they provide in the screw box) to drill the hole at the proper depth, I do have a SDS rotary hammer but for just drilling holes I felt it's an overkill. I then use a cordless drill to drive the Tapcons in. Problems is I don't like to use the phillips head Tapcon, I have a hard time getting them to be perfectly flushed. Sometimes with Tapcon I drives them all the way in and they spin and not bite, and sometimes they just bite at 1/8" from the surface when I need them flushed. With furring strips I need them flushed. I have better luck with driving the hex head Tapcons but they won't be flushed.
I do agree with those who said using actuating tools on a strap hole may not be a good idea. Good point. I will use hex head Tapcons for those since they don't need to be flushed.
Any other ideas that would give good and quicker results without using two drills interchangeably? Cost is a concern but not a big one.
MC
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MiamiCuse wrote: ...

No problem, the point of the projectile sticks out the muzzle a fraction of an inch to locate the position, then you press against the surface firmly enough to release the trigger-locking mechanism and fire. For block you'll use a surface washer anyway to provide the backing. They work fine; just finished mounting some electrical boxes, conduit straps, etc., in the garage associated w/ the garage door opener under discussion in the thread on the safety lights... :)
I own the inexpensive single-shot pistol-grip Remington; it works adequately and the fasteners made specifically for it are readily available at virtually all "ordinary" hardware/building supply outlets. But Remington doesn't have the wide range of alternatives as does Hilti such as the threaded studs, etc., and not all Hilti will fit to be used in it.
So, I'd recommend the rental option of the Hilti--a good rental shop should have several from which to choose; they make a variety some specifically designed for electrical work such as you're talking as well as others for the construction end. You may want to switch w/ tasks although each will handle a range of fasteners not all...I don't recall model numbers otomh; look at the Hilti site to see the catalog and get an idea then tromp down to the rental location near you...
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Miami, see if you can beg, borrow, steal an impact battery gun. It makes a monumental difference using Tapcons. I went from absolute refusal to use Tapcons (various failures through the years) to being one of their staunchest supporters, all because of the gun. The one I own is : http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/tool_detail_listing.asp?categoryIDE04 18 V with Lithium Ion batteries. Pricey, but excellent tool.
There are other brands.
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-snip-

Tapcon makes a tool [$20?] that holds the bit- then you slip a 'socket' over it and drive the hex head.
http://www.tapcon.com/installationTool.asp
I have one and used it a lot when I first got it. Now I find myself drilling as many holes as I can keep track of- then using my Bosch impact driver to drive the Tapcons. BTW- I have good luck with a bit of lube-- water, spit, whatever --on the Tapcon. If it binds, I back up and drive it in again.
Jim
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On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 21:31:26 -0500, MiamiCuse wrote:

Why do they need to be flush? What is wrong with countersinking them? To get loose tapcons tight, put some HD foil in the hole, a tip I have to try next time.
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On Sat, 28 Nov 2009 13:20:34 -0600, Michael Dobony wrote:

P.S. I never say a box of tapcons with a regular corded hammer drill in them, only drill bits, which can be used in either corded or cordless hammer drills.
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Depends on the weight mostly. And the construction of the wall. If it is block, is every cell grouted? If not, you will have to use shallow tapcons, or a powder actuated fastener will just blow a nice hole in the unfilled block. If you do hit a filled cell, the weight of what's hanging will dictate the fastener. For a lot of them, Tapcons will hold a lot of weight. You can also use sleeve anchors, which I have found to work very well. Be really careful of the placement of the fastener so that you don't drill into a grout line, and drill in the center "meat" of the block or a filled concrete cell whenever possible. Tapcons are easy to use, come in kits with drills and everything, and have incredible pull out ratings.
Steve
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Quarter inch carbide drill, plastic plug in anchors and sheetrock screws do a good job and fairly fast if you drill into the mortar joints. My "cool" room (8x12) has floor to ceiling shelves around 3 of the walls held up that way. Also did the furring strips to cover the bare block walls with sheetrock in the basement.
Harry K
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