This Old [millionaires] House

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I don't know about you, but these home improvement shows are WAY beyond my budget lately.
I was watching This Old House last night and they had a $3000.00 plus consultant hired in to study backyard water drainage and give recommendations. Then they hired a crane to cut down a tree! (So they could "lower" it down gently.) I'm sure that cost a pretty penny.
I just can't relate to these shows anymore so far as my home goes and my budget. ($30,000.00 for a kitchen remodel, $60,000.00 to fix the place up a bit, etc.)
Most people I know are hard pressed to come up with a few thousand dollars for home projects...
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 08:44:29 -0700, "Bill"

or for a new roof!
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I agree. Is that the show which sometimes goes to a "regular person's" house to help out with a project, and it ends up being a custom carved teak mantle found at an antique dealer in Tuscany, shipped by private yacht? :-)
Every time I look at my bathroom sink, whose replacement will involve 400 steps because of the stupid counter design, I think about writing to whatever show it is and telling them I have a budget of $702.18, and not a penny more.
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There are two different parts to the This Old House show: The "regular" This Old House, in which they come in and redo a house, and the on the road part where they help someone with a single project.
The first one is necessarily expensive, because they only do houses that need a lot of work and have a lot of potential, for owners who have the budget to do it. After all, it would be pretty boring show if it was This Old House: For the next several weeks, we'll follow Joe Shmo as he repaints his front porch the quickest way with the cheapest paint and supplies he can find.
I find the on the road segment often has ideas that I can use, such as how to repair a squeeky floor without lifting or damaging the carpet. Yeah, it takes the purchase of a special tool, but so do lots of home repair projects. Last night, they showed how to replace an old cast iron toilet flange so the toilet won't rock on a newly installed floor. Not very glamorous or expensive, but lots of tips about why it had to be done the way it was done and something I might very well face in my own house someday. And trust me, I don't think anyone is more low-budget (or less handy) than I am when it comes to home repair!
Jo Ann
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hillacc at yahoo.com wrote:

    When TOH first started 30 plus years ago, Russ Morash was not so greedy, and WGBH was a simple local public tv station in the Brighton neighborhood of Boston, not a mega provider of content to PBS.
The first TOH project was a smple house in Dorchester, Mass., not far from where I lived, and it was a simple and do able budget.
TOH has evolved and not for the better.
The Ask TOH spin off is the only thing from the franchise worth watching.
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wrote:

I remember watching Bob V. making kitchen cabinet boxes with a table saw (yup, Sears) on one of the earlier shows. Bob actually got his hands dirty (Gasp!). - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Retired Shop Rat: 14,647 days in a GM plant. Now I can do what I enjoy: Large Format Photography
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wrote:

Running them through a sawblade? (Norm pulls a funny on Bob and told him it was a "Hot Dog" saw. Yuk yuk.)
--
Red...

"If women don\'t find you handsome, they should at least find you handy."
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on 10/19/2007 6:44 PM Red Green said the following:

Norm was a craftsman. Vila was just an emcee.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

Responding from the other side of The Pond, I used to watch TOH with Norm on it. Whilst it was quite interesting and useful, my main facination with it was as a mild comedy. We all have these workshops, right?
emcee - no idea? Please help!
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emcee = M.C. = Master of Ceremonies
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

My thanks, much appreciated.
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willshak wrote:

Norm is a machinist, who just happens to work in wood instead of metal.
As much as I like his one-man show (which is presumably why he isn't on ATOH), I'd like to see him do some projects with just the skill saw, jigsaw, hand drill, and hand tools that most limited-budget, limited-space DIYs have. (In the real world, if you have a cheap table saw at home, you are considered lucky, much less a planer and joiner and biscut cutter, ad nauseum.) A couple years ago, they made a big deal on a few shows of showing how to do a particular procedure without the expensive tools, but I guess the sponsors who equip hos shop bitched about that, because it seems to have gone away.
aem sends...
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aemeijers wrote:

I agree, the sponsors might get most of the credit for upselling and making the shows DIY for doctors ;-) Several years ago, our local PBS carried several "home grown" DIY shows from an upper midwest PBS station. Two were dad/son shows that really had a lot of good how-to's and tips on each 1/2hr show. Only lasted a few seasons.
-- larry / dallas
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This one used no modern power tools.
    http://www.pbs.org/wws /
--
Red...

"If women don\'t find you handsome, they should at least find you handy."
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re: There are two different parts to the This Old House show
Actually, there are two different shows: "This Old House" and "Ask This Old House". "Ask This Old House" is the road-show you speak of.
I don't know how old you are, but I believe the point that the OP was making is the difference between today's "This Old House" and the one many of us grew up with. No, they didn't paint Joe Shmo's porch, but they did do projects that showed what an average to above-average homeowner could do to improve their home. The projects were somewhere between the small repair projects of "Ask This Old House" and the multi-million dollar projects shown on "This Old House" today. And yes, they did take a few weeks to finish, not three days like the DIY To The Rescue shows on now.
IIRC it was just after Bob Villa left TOH that the projects began to move away from the "I can do that!" style to "Meet Guisppe Guardalino, Master Plasterer who is going to hand plaster this 6000 sq ft guest house right after we raise the barn 2 ft off the foundation and turn it 90 degrees"
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Point taken ;-)
Jo Ann (Pretty old, but a recent first-time homeowner)
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on 10/19/2007 2:39 PM DerbyDad03 said the following:

I like the exterior restoration of old houses. What happens on the inside doesn't impress me as much. Except maybe the plumbing.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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hillacc at yahoo.com wrote:

...
Actually, the part I saw that was pretty kewl was the plaster wall repair w/ the adhesive behind the wall to stick it to the lath again and the plastic-washer screws into the lath to bring the section back into solid contact. Hadn't seen that before.
The real advantage of it imo, being in a small market area where new technology is slow to arrive (if ever) is the number of products they demonstrate that are clever solutions that are new (at least to me)...
--
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Yes, I thought that was pretty remarkable, too. Holy cow, the patience it would take to do that over a very extensive area, though...wow.
Jo Ann
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Can you describe this in any more detail? This sounds like something I could use.
Bob
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