Texas 85 mph - Don't work well with fog

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On Nov 28, 7:07 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

g> wrote:

NO, you brought in everyting else and I was waiting for you to bring in the kitchen sink. You never actually addressed _anything_ I said about getting the car off the road.
Harry K
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On Nov 27, 9:21 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm glad you finally agree with what I said way back up thread. If you had stuck to the subject all this hoo fa ra wouldn't have happened.
YOu addition of "blizzard" is not an improvement as the same advice pertains to both blizzard, fog, dust strom . Where-ever there is greatly reduced visibility.
Your addition of "stay in the car" was alos an unnedded additon as I had said nothing at all about it until you added it. The advice from experts (again) is if you can't get the car off the road - GET OUT OF THE CAR AND OFF THE ROAD until the crashign ends.
Harry K
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Wes Groleau wrote:

I'm pretty sure there hasn't been a blizzard in south Texas in quite some time...
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Pete C. wrote:

Depends on what you mean by "blizzard." A few years ago, it snowed THREE times in Houston, about 1/4" each time. They closed the schools. They closed the roads. They closed the airports. Those families that didn't huddle in the family room, filled the church pews. Grocery stores ran out of canned goods.
Little children, wearing all the clothes they owned, scraped the snow from car hoods, constructed six-inch tall snowmen and called them good.
We still refer to the "Blizzards of ought-six!"
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On 11-26-2012 08:35, Pete C. wrote:

Define "south." Define "some time." Weather was nice last time I was in Texas. Time before that--1973--I didn't see much snow but there sure was a heck of a lot of ice everywhere.
Anyway, in spite of not changing the subject line, plenty of people in this thread have been talking about places other than Texas and conditions other than fog.
--
Wes Groleau

“Grant me the serenity to accept those I cannot change;
  Click to see the full signature.
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Smart drivers, if the conditions permit, will be off, way off, on the berms and not wait for an exit.
Harry K
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wrote:

Pretty hard to get past the Jersey Barriers or the Armco on a lot of highways.
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On Nov 24, 5:43 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Odd, I thought that was self evident...but apparently not. You also forgot to mention guard rails, deep ditchs, rock cliffs, etc.
Harry K
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wrote:

Canadian Sheild rock-cuts
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wrote:

Assuming there are berms. In many places, there is but a normal width shoulder, a very dangerous place to stop in good weather, let alone in fog. If no place to hide, I'm getting off.
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It is the rare freeway that does not have wide, shallow berms. Of course the byways are another sory.
You are in dense fog and will wait for an exit? Not me, I will be as far off the road as I can get (withoing reason) as soon as I can find the edge of the highway.
Harry K
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wrote:

There's no easy answer if you can't see where you're going, unless you really know the road. Plenty of interstates have steep drop-offs past the edge. Am I driving into a river? I'm sure that many won't leave the road for that reason. And with drainage at the sides, you're probably looking at a tow and maybe some repairs. If it came to it, I'd probably go left into the median. But hell, you can't see that either.
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Exactly but I'd rather smash up my car than have it smashed between two other vehicles. Tow bills are cheap over hospital bills.
Harry K
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<stuff snipped>
<It is the rare freeway that does not have wide, shallow berms. Of course the byways are another sory. You are in dense fog and will wait for an exit? Not me, I will be as far off the road as I can get (within reason) as soon as I can find the edge of the highway.>
When I was in California, I found myself cresting a small mountain with the morning rush hour traffic and then entering fog so thick I was not able to see anything but the tail lights of the car ahead of me and the headlights of the car behind me. I was panicking but these drivers slowed just a little bit and all followed the leader for several miles until the fog was gone. It all depends on how good the "point" driver is, I guess. I think things would have been much worse outside of rush hour with people traveling at higher speeds. I really thought we were all going to die but we hust
I thought about pulling over but up there in the mountains, every foot you stray from the traveling portion of the roadway could be a foot closer to a very steep drop. Staying in lane (no one passed anyone!) and proceeding slowly but carefully seemed to work out in that case. Every case is different, though. I really got the impression this was such a common event on that particular mountain that people just figured out what worked and coped.
Fog and blizzard driving are two very different things. Unless you're an emergency responder, there's little excuse for getting caught in a blizzard with today's weather forecasting technology. I am not sure I'd go very far off the road in a blizzard because you could get buried by a snowplow and end up like Per Hansa from "Giants in the Earth." I would try to find an exit and a motel ASAP or even a gas station or restaurant, especially if conditions were worsening. Two years in Buffalo, where snow starts in October and lingers until May.
-- Bobby G.
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2012 15:28:37 -0500, "Robert Green"

"Today's weather forecasting technology". Now *that's* funny!
We drove through one a couple of decades ago on a trip from Eastern NY to East-central IL. The snow started about the western 100mi of I80 in PA. From there to Columbus, OH took eight hours, where it turned into ice. At times it was so bad that the only thing I could see was the tail lights of the truck I was glued to. If he was driving across corn fields, so was I. Trucks occasionally passed us at "normal" highway speeds and it was "dead reckoning" for 20-30 seconds.
I wouldn't have made the trip at all except that the FIL was in the hospital, for the last time. We wanted to get our son there to see him for the last time.
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Vic Smith wrote:

There is virtually never any fog on the highway designated for 85mph speed limit. Truth be told, there is seldom any moisture on that stretch of road.
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2012 15:44:52 -0600, Vic Smith

I'm familiar with that highway since I lived in Beaumont once. Some people who live there drive crazy like driving 70 mph in blinding fog when they can't even see in front of their car/truck. I saw this when I lived there unfortunately.
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Vic Smith wrote:

I'm sure the speed limit is adjusted for weather. By law, you're supposed to do it yourself without any prodding by electrical speed limit signs.
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Speed limits are always "reasonable and proper". ...both the maximum and minimums, if any.
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Driving too fast for conditions - and if you argue that they throw "driving without due care and attention " - or "careless driving". That IS a serious charge.
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