Texas 85 mph - Don't work well with fog

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Been lucky I guess. Only a few times I was caught in heavy fog or rain/snow on the interstate. Seems very few people passed me when I put on my blinkers and went as slow as about 20 mph. But I could see maybe 15-30 feet. Must be terrible to find yourself in zero visibility. Only thing I can figure with the big Texas pile-up damage is folks went from good visibility into a wall of fog that was already pile up with crashed vehicles. When I hitch-hiked from Norfolk to Chicago in the '60's I picked up a ride with dead-heading trucker late at night. Mack pulling an empty flatbed. Never forget it. Our talking was what kept him from nodding off. Penn turnpike near Beaver Falls. Fog for about 20 miles, maybe 50 ft visibility. He never went below 80. Took a year off my life. I said goodbye at his first fuel stop, out of the fog. But I wanted away from him.
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2012 15:44:52 -0600, Vic Smith

A good driver will pull on the shoulder and park when the fog gets as bad as it did in Texas. I'd rather lose a few hours, than get killed or my car wrecked. Then again, when the fog is that bad, I avoid getting on a freeway, or get off the nearest ramp when it begins. Some drivers have no brains.
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

The accident may well have begun with someone who pulled to the shoulder and parked and thus when the next person suddenly found themselves in dense fog they followed the tail lights directly into that stopped vehicle. Fog can appear very suddenly and a road that had great visibility can have a fog bank blow over it from an adjacent area in seconds. The area in question is reported to be straight and level, a 75mph zone and have some adjacent marsh areas where the fog likely rolled in from. Exits are miles apart.
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wrote:

Merely speculation, unless you have personally spoken to the person who was first in the crash. I'd probably to be the first to intentionally drive off the road into a corn field if the fog was that bad. I'd rather pay for a tow than get into a crash like that. A marsh..... well, that's another story!
By the way, I think 75mph is TOO fast for any highway, anywhere, anytime. I also learned when I took drivers ed (about 44 years ago), that a person should maintain a distance of one car length for every 10 mph of travel, and should also drive according to conditions. The max speed limit is only for perfect conditions. In average fog, I rarely exceed 25 mph. In heavy fog, even slower.
Maybe Texas wil learn something from this and lower the speed limit. Then again, I have my doubts. Speed limits are mostly posted so cops can make money, not for safety. I bet they also have a minimum speed limit, which I think is rediculous. I had a cop pull me over once and tell me I was going too slow. I pointed to the wet road and said "would you rather I cause a car wreck?". I was doing around 35 in a 55 at the time, with no posted minimum speed. I didn't get a ticket, but the young cop seemed to think he was a real smart ass. I came close to asking him how long he has been driving, compared to my 45 or so years, but decided to just shut up and listen, since I was not in the mood for a hassle.
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2012 20:43:37 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

I drive that speed every day, sometimes more if the conditions are right. Speed has to be adjusted to fit the conditions.

Pretty much agree with that. You should not over drive your visibility.

Going too slow is just as likely to cause an accident. Good tires can handle wet road easily at 55. Snow or ice is different.
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On 11/23/2012 11:05 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Ed do you remember a Cadillac or across the board GM option for an infrared heads up display for driving in fog? I haven't searched for it but I'll be darned if I don't remember seeing something like that shown in one of the Popular Science/Mechanics magazines. I wonder if anyone else recalls such a thing? O_o
TDD
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2012 23:50:08 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Yes, I sort of remember something like that, but recall it seeing deer in the road too.
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On Nov 24, 5:49am, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky- finger.net> wrote:

There is an anti-collision radar due to be sold on European cars soon. http://www.gizmag.com/radar-car-collision-prevention-systems-put-to-the-test/8813 /
Apparently unaffected by fog.
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2012 23:50:08 -0600, The Daring Dufas

It's being worked on. Liability is the big reason it isn't here now.
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Ice is a bit different!!! When we were allowed to run Carbide studs, the old Valiant held the road better on ice than on sloppy snow. When I changed from the old Valiant to the Dart they outlawed studs - and the Dart was totally useless on ice.
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Per snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca:

Problems I've had were on long gradual ascents.
At some point in the increasing grade, the load on the drive tires exceeds their traction and they start to spin.
Not a big deal once you figure out what's going on, but the first time the vehicle starts slewing side-to-side for no apparent reason, there's a "WTF?" moment.
--
Pete Cresswell

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I've had twice when I'd been crawling up hill, in snow and ice. Someone comes flying past me, and I say "must be safe to go faster". I push the gas a little harder, and spin out.
Drive exceeds traction. Oops.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Problems I've had were on long gradual ascents.
At some point in the increasing grade, the load on the drive tires exceeds their traction and they start to spin.
Not a big deal once you figure out what's going on, but the first time the vehicle starts slewing side-to-side for no apparent reason, there's a "WTF?" moment.
--
Pete Cresswell



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On Sat, 24 Nov 2012 13:13:51 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

ditch.
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Wish it were the speeder in the ditch.
Both times I'm thinking about, I made the mistake of trying to drive a "little" faster, and I was the one who landed, backwards, on the guard rail.
Though, I have seen plenty of people in the ditch as I crawled by at a safe speed.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

And a few moments later you find the "hot dog" backwards in the ditch.
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Per Stormin Mormon:

In my case, what momentarily confused me was that I was not trying to drive faster. In fact, I was paying close attention to not varying the power at all (to avoid loosing traction).
What got me was that the road's grade had increased very slightly and I was apparently close to the edge of adhesion to begin with.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 11-24-2012 21:54, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

If you have room, i.e., not a lot of traffic, front-wheel drive and cruise control is great.
If the drive wheels begin to slip, CC keeps them going at a speed consistent with the car's speed, so that as soon as the road gets a little less slippery, they grip again.
But fog and traction aren't related.
--
Wes Groleau

You're all individuals!
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2012 01:58:53 -0500, Wes Groleau

Maybe on older cars, but not on new ones with traction control or Electronic Stability Control. As soon as the computer senses a slip of a wheel, it cuts of the CC.
Besides, CC keeps the wheel going at a speed consistent with what the care "should" be traveling at so if it slows down due to slippage it is going to provide more power so it slips even more.
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What year did that begin? My car is a 2005 and it would be nicee to have that. Dunno if it doe.

Ummm, sorta. It will actually _decrease_ power while the wheels are spinning as less power is neededd to keep them rotating at the set speed. It _will_ increase power to reaccelerate the vehicle to set speed when traction is regained - that is the cuase of that "It will take off like an airplane" moronic old wives tail that circulated around e-mail for awhile.
Harry K
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wrote:

My 2001 Buick was like that and my 2007, 2010, 2013 Hyundai Sonatas are like that.
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I'll have to try it out the next time the roads are slick. 2005 Ford
Harry K
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