Telephone ring problem

My telephone line as developed a problem. When someone calls the phone rings one very short ring and then the line goes dead. As a result I can't receive calls but calling out is not affected. Any suggestions?
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call your phone co
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Harry Avant wrote:

The incoming call is being forwarded to Nigeria or somesuch. Here's the way this scam works:
You get a collect call from someone at the jail. They profusely apologize for the wrong number, claim they only get one 'phone call, and all you have to do is punch some magic numbers and the call will be forwarded along with the charges.
Thereafter, all your incoming calls are routed to Bongo-Bongo and you get the bill.
There IS a sequence (*WAtermelon-U812-Green or something) to turn off call forwarding.
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Well I haven't received any collect calls and I don't have call forwarding.

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Harry Avant wrote:

If you call your number yourself ( from cell, pay, neighbors, whatever) what happens ?? does someone/something answer, or does it ring forever ??
Did you recently add/replace any phones, faxes, modems, Tivo, alarm, etc ??
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Look in the front of your local phone book for the codes that work for you.
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Harry Avant, 12/25/2007,6:41:22 PM, wrote:

Begin by eliminating any internal wiring or phones as the source of the problem. Remove all phones, fax machines and modems from the wall jacks. Take a corded type phone to the NIM (Network Interface Module) attached to your house where the phone company hooks up. Plug your phone into that module and see if the problem remains. If not then you have something inside the house causing your line to appear busy and messages are going to voicemail or just appearing busy. If it continues at the NIM then your phone company will have to check the circuit.
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unplug all cordless phones
does that fix it?
if it doesnt, unplug network interface, plug regular phone in interface. if that doesnt fix it call phone company its there problem.
I had that exact trouble turned out to be a bad card in their system.
if plugging a regular phone in the interface works get a cheap 25 foot telephone extension cord, plug in interface run inside home to a phone so you have service while this gets sorted out.
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I've done all of the standard things like unplug all but one phone, etc. I used a cell phone to call myself and I can hear part of a ring then a dead line. I've got the phone co coming out but they are backed up and I was hoping to find a fix rather than wait on them. I do know that AT&T has been doing a lot of upgrades in this area such as running fiber optics and such. I just wander if it's something they inadvertently did.

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the land phone company can temporarily forward all land calls to your cell till this is fixed. free service for land during tech troubles
i would plug regular phone into NID on side of home to positively decide if its your wiring or the phone companies.
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I checked the box where the phone lines come to the house and it doesn't have any place to plug in a phone. The lines and box are about 40 years old. Maybe when the tech gets here he can install a more modern device.
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It would be an excellent idea to insist on it.
Your problem is called "ring trip". It is almost certainly caused by a wet junction box, which causes corrosion to grow between terminals of a cable pair. The corrosion breaks down under the high voltage from ringing current, which conducts just enough that the telco switch thinks the line has gone off hook (i.e., it has been answered). That causes the ring voltage to be dropped immediately.
If you had a proper interface you would be able to very easily check whether the problem is from your house wiring, or not. You'll want to remember that the reason you cannot is because *they* have not installed a proper interface. If this problem does turn out to be your house wiring and they want to bill you for the time they spent, refuse to pay *because* they did not have the proper interface.
Most likely it is not in your house wiring, and instead someone left one of their junction boxes slightly ajar and a bit of rain water leaked in. They'll find it and fix it.
--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) snipped-for-privacy@apaflo.com
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As the OP said, this is a "ring trip" condition.
It is usually INSIDE the home and most often caused by a defective telephone device (telephone, modem, Caller ID box, satellite set-top box, etc) that is connected to the line. On fewer occasions inside, it is caused by a corroded jack.
With all (and I mean (*ALL*) equipment unplugged, if the problem persists, it is probably a corroded connecting block (jack). These are usually found in damp locations, most often on an exterior wall below grade.
Examine all the plug ends of the devices you have disconnected. The contacts should be shiny and bright brass. If they are not, closely examine the jack itself. If its contacts are not shiny brass, the jack should be replaced. Also, whatever was plugged-in there has a corroded plug-end on the base cord. That should be replaced, too. If it is not, it will cause the same trouble to resume if plugged back in.
If all equipment is disconnected and all jacks appear OK, I'd just wait for the telco tech to isolate and repair the trouble.
If you do NOT have a SNI/NID (Standard Network Interface Device), you should NOT be billed if the trouble is inside the home. If you do NOT subscribe to your telco's inside wiring maintenance plan, they SHOULD install the modern device so, in the future. you CAN isolate your stuff from theirs. Also, if one is installed - and you don't have the monthly maintenance plan - you ARE liable for a Trouble Isolation Charge in the future. Good luck!
--
:)
JR

Climb poles and dig holes
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Jim Redelfs wrote:

I have had that trouble also. It was just as you described it. And the jack that went bad was on an outside wall, right at grade. I fixed it by moving the jack to another location well above grade.
Bill Gill
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Harry Avant wrote:

elsewhere. One of my neighbors got caught up in an identity theft scam and this was part of it where credit card purchase checks calls got forwarded to the scammer and he OK'ed them.
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