Stripped Torx screws

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I would use the thin cut-off wheel on a moto-tool to cut a slot across the head. Then use a flat screwdriver. If the screw is a flat head, you may have the use a small "easy out." as others have suggested.
Joseph Meehan wrote:

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"_ZZ" wrote:

Clamp a small pair of vise grips on the outside of the fastner to get the screw started, then continue with whatever method (vise grips, fingers, torx, et cetera) you prefer from then on out. If that doesn't work, slit the screw and use a flat screwdriver.
Jon
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On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 11:38:42 -0700, "Jon Danniken"

You know, that would have been my first try, but the screws are indented (bastards! <g>).
I have a Dremel tool, but now I'm wishing I had bought the vari-speed. The full-speed one is great for cutting circuit boards, etc. but a bit scarey in this application. I also don't like the thought of a blade flying apart at such a rotational speed. I saw that with a sanding disk once...Impressive enough.
Is there a light-weight, low-powered tool that does this kind of thing well? Probably a small, versatile battery-powered drill of some kind. Between a battery-powered screwdriver and a plugin Dremel.
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You might try a "worn down" cutoff wheel. When worn, the diameter can be as small as 3/8". Not knowing the exact geometry of the drive, it's hard to know if this would work. You still have to physically get the tool in the area. BTW, use safety glasses ... these wheels can fly when they break up and they WILL break.
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I was able to remove the torx screws on my E2 with a very small (1/16") regular slotted screwdriver.
GC

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Heating the screw with a soldering iron will help to free it, if you can devise a method of turning it. bw..OJ
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On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 12:41:52 GMT, "old jon"

No. Heating the screw will make it expand, which will make it harder to extract.
Sears has screw extractors. Get the kind for screws that cannot be drilled - the one that fits over the head of the screw and has left-handed protrusions inside which grip the screw.
Go easy or you will snap the screw off. You should soak the threads in anti-seize liquid like WD-40 overnight to help ease the unscrewing.
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On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 13:20:55 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@uce.gov (Bob) wrote:

SInce the heads on these screws are probably protruding above the casing, a high-tolernace pair of needle-nose pliers might be used to turn them. Other alternatives include using a high acid silver solder plus a clean torx bit, soldering the torx bit into the screw head (Or at least making an impression of the screw head even if they dont' mechanically join.
I have to wonder what gain there is in getting these screws out though, if the drive is scrap anyway and they can't RMA it, then maybe using a drill press to drill the head off is enough.
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A small pair of vice grips can also be used.

I would be afraid of burning something.
He might try JB Weld overnight epoxy. That stuf is strong enough to repair an engine block

They aren't going to RMA a drive that has obviously been tampered with.
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On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 19:03:00 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@uce.gov (Bob) wrote:

Perhaps, but all the vice grips I've seen had so much play in them it might be hard to grip the screws- drive screws usually dont' stick up much.

Naw, the entire drive shell is a pretty massive 'sink... all you have to do is get the bit above the melting point of the solder and that can even be done before it's inserted into the screwhead.

Yes that might work, providing at least one of the surfaces is roughened up some with some sandpaper. Even JDWeld doesn't do too well in high-torque situations on smooth surfaces.

.... but it has already, the screw head is already stripped.
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If the screw head protrudes, you can cut a slot in it with a Dremel tool cut-off wheel and use a conventional screwdriver on it. This of course won't work if the cutoff wheel is too thick for the tiny screw, but the lightest-duty cutoff wheel is pretty thin. I've used this method many times for larger screws - works great.
Roy Lewallen
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wrote:

If the screw is too small you can use an extractor like the one at Sears. It fits over the head and has left-handed protrusions inside to grip the head.
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On Wed, 24 Aug 2005 07:08:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@uce.gov (Bob) wrote:

The thread is old enough now that I've not retained the first parts, don't remember if this is an external casing holding the drive or a drive itself. If an external casing the screws probably are recessed... and if memory serves correctly, my Craftsman extractors are all larger than the typical plastic recessions for smaller screws. It'd probably work though if minor cosmetic damage was acceptible.
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You still have to heat the screw at least to the melting point of the silver solder for it to stick.
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On Wed, 24 Aug 2005 07:07:23 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@uce.gov (Bob) wrote:

Yes, but if the case is metal that shouldn't matter. Heating and contraction (after cooling) might even help to free it if it's stuck in a dissimilar metal case. It may not be necessary to heat the screw though, I wasn't only considering trying to solder the bit to the screw, but also that if the bit with molten solder is inserted in the screw head, the solder will still cool to the shape of the screw head even if it doesn't adhere to it... and it was one of the reasons I suggested silver solder (or something else other than tin/lead) as it is tougher than std tin/lead.
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kony wrote:

Am I missing something?
While the case might be metal, there's a good chance that some of the internal components aren't... Heat those up and your drive is dead in the water!
Notan
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wrote:

Yes, you're missing that heat density high enough to melt solder on a bit will not heat up and entire drive enough to damage it. Ever noticed that things can be soldered and the rest of the board isn't trash afterwards? Same situation, except that it's an order of magnitude harder to heat up a giant hunk of metal enough to do damage.

If someone has never soldered anything large in their entire life, this certainly isn't the best project to start out with... but generally speaking, it's rather trivial to heat up a piece and not have it heat up a giant block of metal connected by a mere millimeter or two of loose contact, very much at all in the time it takes to melt a little solder.
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kony wrote:

I used to design, and build, printed circuit boards, so I'm more than casually familiar with soldering techniques! <g>
What I'm not familiar with is the design of *this* particular hard drive enclosure. Are sheet metal or machine screws used? Are they driven into plastic or some type of threaded metal?
See where I'm going?
Notan
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I think the moral of this endless saga is to RMA the bloody drive and not try to take it apart.
Another lesson to be learned is that hard metal screws seize on aluminum so you must lubricate before trying to unscrew. That's what they make WD-40 for.
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wrote:

yes but I have no idea, I"d already deleted the rest of the thread and too lazy to go hunt it down again. In any case, it should not damage a drive as those are encased in metal, it'd be a problem if the screw was in a plastic casing though I'd be surprised if the screw was very hard to get out of a plastic casing so I suppose I'd assumed metal.
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