Torx masonry screws

I have to attach a TV bracket to a conventional brick-with-plaster wall.
The bracket is a hinged extending design which means that even with a small
TV the weight supported will be considerable. Plus, the baseplate of the
bracket has to be spaced out from the wall by some 50mm, probably with a
block of timber or similar.
Would these Torx-head frame fixing screws be suitable? I've never used
them.
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Alternatively I could use conventional Rawl-type bolt fittings but would
need to replace the bolts with considerably longer ones if the design
allows; I've not found any which come with longer bolts as standard.
Many thanks.
Reply to
Bert Coules
In article ,
Screwfix have Rawlbolts with a fixture size of 75mm in M10. they also do M12 with a 60mm fixture size.
Reply to
charles
I have used them to hold in plastic window and door frames where there really is not much load. The hole you drill first does have to be the right size. In you case I am not sure what happens if the wall is breeze block rather than brick.
Reply to
Michael Chare
Thanks. Similarly, I've seen them used for fence posts against an exterior brick wall, where, again, there's much less load than there would be for my extended TV arm.
Reply to
Bert Coules
So what's "today"? If you can explain exactly how to make my TV hover unsupported I'd be very grateful for the details.
Reply to
Bert Coules
In article ,
I have a TV on a longish arm(s) in the kitchen. Allows it to be swivelled to use when cooking, or when eating at the other end of the room. The arms are long enough so the TV can be pivoted up against them - ie at right angles to the wall.
It is mounted using rawlbolts into plaster over brick. And the arm gets likely more use (movement) than many.
The load on fence posts in the recent winds might be a lot higher than you'd guess. ;-)
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
Too short, if spaced out by 50 mm IMHO. Provided it is reasonably good brick you might get away with not less than 150 mm. They are pretty secure, but as you are aware a TV bracket can impose a significant moment, and therefore a "pull-out" force. And the force isn't constant, it varies every time you use the bracket.
Personally I would put in high quality plastic plugs and something like 5 inch No 12 screws if fixing directly. In fact, since you need a spacer I would probably screw that securely to the wall, and simply screw the bracket to the spacer. This has the advantage that if you "lose" one or more screws to soggy mortar, or similar, you can put another screw somewhere more secure. And also locate the bracket exactly where you want it, and get it exactly upright.
Reply to
newshound
In article ,
I had sort of that problem with the kitchen TV. The arm type bracket is positioned near the edge of the chimney breast - too close to guarantee a decent fixing to the brick. So I chased in a steel strip which is bolted to the bricks further in, and the arm bolted to that. The steel strip is tiled over, with tiles cut to fit around the arm mounting bracket.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
That's very similar to what I'm planning.
That seems the best way forward for me too.
Reply to
Bert Coules
Chris J Dixon linked to:
On an easel! So obvious once it's pointed out. But there are wall mounts there too, so I'm not totally out of touch with today's trends (though I'd think more than twice about siting my expensive new telly directly above a fire).
Reply to
Bert Coules
I have seen it suggested that the easel mount would go well with those TVs that are set up to look like an artwork when you are not watching them (I don't mean in the "if a tree falls in a forest" way). No idea how much power they use.
Chris
Reply to
Chris J Dixon

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