Spider control?

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wrote:

Very nice web site you provided. You should read it.
You must be very young. You've missed 20 years' worth of knowledge. It's not nice to gamble with the health of your children and their children. Here are a few resources for your enlightenment:
http://www.oag.state.ny.us/environment/inerts96.html
http://www.safe2use.com/poisons-pesticides/inerts/cox-inerts.htm
http://www.checnet.org/healthehouse/education/articles-detail.asp?Main_ID 9
http://www.epa.gov/opprd001/inerts/fr54.htm
" Inert ingredients, on the other hand, were not subject to testing requirements until 1987.(7) The requirements for health and safety testing of inerts which EPA established at that time were called "minimal"(7) even by EPA. They did not include tests for the following serious hazards:(7) a.. the ability to cause cancer a.. the ability to adversely affect fertility and reproduction a.. the ability to damage the nervous system No tests at all were required of inerts already in use in 1987; testing requirements apply only to inerts first used in pesticides since that date.(7)
http://www.pesticide.org/InertsBkgdApr03.html
" Unfortunately, the public is not provided information about what inert ingredients are included in pesticide products in most cases, despite the fact that inert ingredients may comprise over 99% of the total pesticide formulation and may be significantly more toxic than the active ingredient. A recent study found that at least 382 of the chemicals that the U.S EPA lists as inert ingredients were once, or currently are, also registered as active ingredients. Among the ingredients listed as both inert and active ingredients are chloropicrin, which has been linked to asthma and pulmonary edema and chlorthanonil, a probable human carcinogen.
http://www.healthychild.com/database/the_myth_of_safety_-_a_failed_regulatory_system.htm
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On Thu, 06 May 2004 03:12:04 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
:) > :) > :) Hint: Pyrethrin's one of the safest "cides" around. But, the :) "carrier" - the :) > :) so called inert ingredients in pesticides - they haven't been subject :) to :) > :) testing since the late 1960s or early 1970s. :) > :) > :) > ?????? Here is the EPA site, updated Jan 2004, of the lists for inert :) > materials allowed to be used in pest control products. :) > http://www.epa.gov/opprd001/inerts/lists.html :) > :) :) Very nice web site you provided. You should read it. :) :) You must be very young. You've missed 20 years' worth of knowledge. It's not :) nice to gamble with the health of your children and their children. Here are :) a few resources for your enlightenment: :) :) " Inert ingredients, on the other hand, were not subject to testing :) requirements until 1987.(7) The requirements for health and safety testing :) of inerts which EPA established at that time were called "minimal"(7) even :) by EPA. They did not include tests for the following serious hazards:(7) :) a.. the ability to cause cancer :) a.. the ability to adversely affect fertility and reproduction :) a.. the ability to damage the nervous system :) No tests at all were required of inerts already in use in 1987; testing :) requirements apply only to inerts first used in pesticides since that :) date.(7) :) Just questioning the statement you painted insinuating no testing has been done on inerts since the 60's when in fact several category listings are kept by the EPA, with evaluation of many being an ongoing process. By just the fact that a tolerance exemption may be granted under the FQPA, passage in 1996, suggests that ongoing monitoring/testing must be going on.
Lar. (to e-mail, get rid of the BUGS!!
It is said that the early bird gets the worm, but it is the second mouse that gets the cheese.
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wrote:

Not really. Many nasty things happen because consumers are comfortable with the mistaken belief that "if it's being sold, it must be safe".
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Never Mind Doug, he's against all things foreign to the environment, and many natural ones as well. Lots of doom and gloom.
Keep in mind that DDT is destructive to wildlife and even people in large enough concentrations, but the millions of people still alive in third world countries due to the use of DDT to eliminate mosquito-borne ailments such as malaria don't seem to mind.
Jeff
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Do you have a basement?

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No, under the house is a big cement block.

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OK. I was curious because it seemed that most of the spiders in my house came from the basement, and were greatly reduced after certain measures were taken. But, the measures would only apply to a basement. Never mind.

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No problem. This place was built upon a huge cement block. Really odd if you ask me .. but hey, I just rent the joint.

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What measures?
Banty (has basement, curious..)
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Doug Kanter says...

What worked for me:
1) Eliminate dampness (dehumidifier, getting all stored items WELL off the floor and out of corners).
2) Vacuuming corners & crevices thoroughly and regularly, especially the dark ones where webs/egg sacs aren't disturbed by human movements.
3) Eliminating cardboard, which harbors OTHER bugs that can be a food source for spiders.
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An excellent, scientifically-based website on brown recluse spiders: http://www.ku.edu/~recluse /
It recommends the use of sticky traps.
Regards, =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-Mike Lacy, Ft Collins CO 80523 Clean out the 'junk' to email me.
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In addition to, or instead of chemicals, be sure to seal up gaps and cracks with a latex-based foam gap filler. I prefer latex based because it's easier to work with and is not so hard when cured as polyurethane types. Dap makes a good one.
Then, pick up fold-up glue traps for spiders at the store and place them around the baseboards to pick up any that still sneak in. This will not only catch them, but it'll let you know where you might need to to a better job of filling tiny gaps and cracks.
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Thanks, that is a good idea.

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Often, a good cleaning, eliminating insects in the house and stomping the few that get in is a very effective control. Micro encapsulated pesticides work to some extent as a perimiter treatment, most sprays you'll need to hit them directly to have any effect.
Jeff
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