Seal electrical boxes with aluminum tape?

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On 3/19/2013 1:06 AM, Roy wrote:

must be accessible at all times. There should be NO sparks inside those boxes EVER. Where did you get that idea of sparks?

sparks
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On 3/19/2013 5:00 AM, RBM wrote:

Hey RBM, when you see a situation where one extension won't satisfy space requirements, do you do what I do? Mount another box or get a 6x6x4 or 8x8x4 and put everything in there? o_O
TDD
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On 3/19/2013 7:36 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/RACO-Flat-Blank-Square-Box-Cover-5A053?BaseItemZ050

Exactly, if you have that many cables to splice, you use a larger box, a small trough, or multiple boxes. Id really like to see this multi-ganged 1900 extension set up with cables coming out in all directions like an octopus.
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...snipped...

...snipped again...

I've never used a trough. If you use something like a 4x4x12 trough, does the "3 inches of wire outside the box" rule still apply?
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On 3/19/2013 10:14 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The Nec requires that all the conductors except ones that are passing through unbroken, be at least 6" long from the point that they enter the box. If the box opening is less than 8" in any dimension, there needs to be minimum of 3" sticking beyond the box
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On 3/19/2013 7:14 PM, RBM wrote:

Some years back, I rewired a building that was being used as a beauty shop, a very large beauty shop. When a storm blew down a tree which landed on the drop from the transformer, it broke the hub on the meter box and sliced the wires like a pair of scissors. It was a 200 amp 3ø service so after discussing it with the customer, I went back in with a 400 amp 3ø service and ran the shop off a 65kw diesel generator while rebuilding the electrical system. I ran all the new circuits overhead and what I did was come out of the breaker panel with a single 2&1/2" EMT and elbow to a large screw cover non-gasket junction box in the drop ceiling and ran my multiple 1/2" EMT 20 amp circuits for hair dryers and work stations out of that. Not running separate 1/2 conduits to the panel made changes and additions very easy not to mention the whole job was easier. My inspector thought it a bit unusual but had no problem with it and it did make for a much neater installation for the inside breaker panel. There was a large trough fed with 4" rigid for the other breaker panels on a wall in the garage area. ^_^
TDD
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On 3/19/2013 11:53 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/RACO-Flat-Blank-Square-Box-Cover-5A053?BaseItemZ050

that. The only issue doing it that way is the requirement to de-rate the value of the conductors in the 2 1/2" conduit
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On 3/20/2013 5:07 AM, RBM wrote:

De-rating was the only issue that came up with the 2&1/2" conduit but with less than 50% fill it was no problem. That was the reason I went with the large size. All the conductors would have fit in a 1&1/2" pipe easily but I went with the bigger pipe to avoid any capacity or wire pulling hangups. The big junction box in the ceiling made wire pulling very easy since I was doing most of the work myself. When I teach guys and gals how to pull wire, I explain that I'm lazy and I want things to be as easy as possible so I will setup a pull so it can be done by one person if need be. Most of what I do these days is low voltage telecom and network wiring and network wiring, especially fiber optic cable is something to be treated gently. I often spend more time planning a cable pull than the time it takes to pull the cable in. ^_^
TDD
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http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/RACO-Flat-Blank-Square-Box-Cover-5A053?BaseItemZ050

wire is a very small increment. Particularly in the grand scheme of things.
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Roy wrote:

First, it would only be the sides of the boxes that would be sealed, so the cover plates could still be taken off and the boxes would still be easily accessible.
About the potential sparks...., I think that is one of the main reasons why electrical connections have to be made inside a junction box or other electrical box -- so that if there are ever any bad or loose connections, shorts, or sparks, they won't cause a fire by burning nearby combustible materials.
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