Rusty Tool Stand

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I'm used to Naval Jelly and wire brushes / drill attachments for small rust issues, but how does one deal with bigger areas?
I've never owned a bench grinder, and recently got an older used unit complete with pedestal stand. The motor runs smoothly and I'm pleased at having spent a whopping forty bucks for a tool that will be of some use to me.
But the pedestal base is quite rusty, with the underside of the base especially bad. I'd say this would be described as severely rusty.
Are there any established techniques for dealing with something that is realistically too big to handle with normal techniques? I know I could say that it's in a dry environment now and probably will outlast me with doing nothing, but I'd still like to get it reasonably cleaned up.
Art
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On Feb 15, 4:29 pm, snipped-for-privacy@unisys.com (Arthur Shapiro) wrote:

Use this...
http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/grinders-buffers/heavy-duty-4-1-2-half-inch-angle-grinder-91223.html
with this...
http://www.harborfreight.com/7-piece-grinder-brush-kit-90976.html
$30 and a new tool.
(or spend more if you want a quality angle grinder.)
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On Wed, 15 Feb 2012 13:43:54 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Or get it sand blasted.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in wrote:

.
All of this media-blasting and angle-grinding seems a bit over-the-top for a grinder stand that will be used in a dry environment.
If it were me, I'd just use 50-grit emery cloth (NOT sandpaper!) to smooth out the rust by hand, then I'd rattle-can the stand with Tremclad or other rust paint. Done.
--
Tegger

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On 2/16/2012 9:00 AM, Tegger wrote:

well of course it's over the top. He could just ignore it and use it the way it is.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 09:26:34 -0600, Steve Barker

If it wasn't dropping rust on the floor that's what I'd do. If it was, I'd knock the loose stuff off, sweep that up, and then leaves it. Rust looks fine on cast iron.
--Vic.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/grinders-buffers/heavy-duty-4-1-2-half-inch-angle-grinder-91223.html
Always wear eye protection - and even face protection - when using a rotating wire brush. Those little filaments of steel sometimes come loose and fly through the air like a harpoon.
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The admonition to use eye-protection is a wise one.
A guy I knew years ago was using a chisel without wearing goggles. He ended up with a chip in his eye and had to go to emergency.
When removing the chip, the guy had to be AWAKE, EYES OPEN. The doctor said, "Whatever you do, don't move your eyes or blink". So my friend was forced to watch as the doctor dug around in the white of his eye to remove the chip.
Can you imagine? Can you?
--
Tegger

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ended
He was lucky. For a lot of people, a grinder was the last thing they would ever see with that eye. The chips fly off faster than the eye can blink.
-- Bobby G.
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On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 12:23:57 -0500, "Robert Green"

I had a friend who used a framing hammer on cut masonry nails, sans eye protection. After which, he had ten similar operations over the next ten days to put his eye back together. The doctor was among the best and he didn't lose the eye but it was a close one.
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On 2/16/2012 11:23 AM, Robert Green wrote:

The only thing that has kept me from losing an eye is the fact that I've been wearing eyeglasses since I was six years old. When I first had the eyeglasses put on me, I looked around and exclaimed, "Wow, that's where all that noise is coming from!" ^_^
TDD
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<stuff snipped>

I'm actually inclined to believe that in the long run, people who need glasses will prevail in the gene pool because it's an adaptation that confers a certain level of eye protection. I've hear things "ding" off my glasses that otherwise might have taken out an eye.
-- Bobby G.
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On 2/17/2012 10:31 AM, Robert Green wrote:

I have the worst vision among me and my eight siblings, we're all myopic and I believe mine is because I was a drug(nicotine) baby back when people didn't know any better than to expose a fetus or infant to that horrid alkaloidal insecticide. I smoked for 9 months then I was born and because of my immersion in that amnio-toxin, I'm deathly allergic to tobacco smoke. It's like tear gas to me. o_O
TDD
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On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 14:57:56 +0000, Tegger wrote:

Yeah, I had it happen to me with a small piece of debris when using an angle grinder last year - I had safety glasses on, but somehow whatever- is-was still managed to get around them and into my eye.
At the hospital I was expecting some sort of high-tech solution, but they wheeled out this ancient light / magnifying device, put some numbing drops in my eye, and then used a broken piece of wooden stick to dig the thing out.
Apparently eyes heal really fast. I had some antibiotics for a couple of days, and it was all back to normal within four or five.
Luckily it was a stone or a piece of paint or something of that nature - apparently metal's worse because it can rust prior to removal and cause all sorts of problems.
cheers
Jules
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Jules Richardson wrote:

I can concur that safety glasses are only a partial solution when using an abrasive or wire-wound tool (unless you are using chem-lab style glasses).
The solution I use is to wear my normal safety glasses underneath a full-face polycarbonate shield. After having a few close calls wearing only safety glasses, this is the only way I fly.
Jon
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On 2/16/2012 3:08 PM, Jon Danniken wrote:

Wise choice. Grinders (and most power tools :o)scare me, having nursed a whole lot of different kinds of injuries. Read about a guy in Florida a couple of years ago using a grinding wheel; wheel broke, fragment flew up and hit him in the neck...he bled to death. Freakish.
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I was at my doctor's clinic, waiting my turn. In comes this very tall big man with more bleeding bandages on than I have seen any human being have. The nurse asked him what happened. "Tangled with a grinder" was all he said. In about five minutes, the nurse came out and said it would be a good while before they could see me, and maybe I should come back the next day. I did.
Hand grinders are the nastiest tool in the box, IMHO, after working with them for 38 years now.
Steve
www.heartsurgerysurvivalguide.com
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I would guess so! ...but why would you grind your hands?
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...but why would you grind your hands?

World's fastest nail file.
--
Tegger

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On 2/16/2012 2:51 PM, Jules Richardson wrote:

Often use stain that shows up under UV light to spot corneal abrasions. The "broken stick" was probably a cotton-tip applicator, the cotton being the business end.

An abrasion can start "healing" to the lining of the eyelid. Ouch! Rust can cause staining of the cornea, so needs prompt attention.

I took care of a guy who turned on his lathe with allen wrench in place...the lathe turned, hung up, and then let the allen wrench fly. Busted the guy's safety glasses....there was blood coming from under his lid when he got to my office, so shipped him out pronto to the ER. He had glass in his eye, small abrasion to the inside of his lid and no injury to the eye itself. Lucky as heck!
Any foreign body needs prompt attention. If it can't be rinsed out quickly, the eye should be covered until one gets to the doctor; patch keeps the eye from moving and causing further abrasion.
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