Run away cars

Page 8 of 10  

snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A "selenoid" is that annoying guy who sold you the car, silly.
KEEP UP PEOPLE!
TDD
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wrote:

I don't know if this is a regional thing or not, but it seems that approximately 99.999999% of the auto parts store employees in Indiana think it's pronounced "sillanoid".
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wrote:

I'd be anoid if they did
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On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 16:13:50 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"

More like a hemorrhoid.
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On Mar 14, 2:23 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

And the _real_ technical term - "That *&*@ thing is broke again"
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On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 13:28:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Anal retentive much?
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 20:32:22 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

transmission, but the manual valve controls the supply of fluid under pressure to the solenoids. The only solenoids generally acting on the shift linkage are the park/brake interlocks that prevent the transmission shifting out of park without the brake being depressed. Park is at the end of the range of motion of the manual linkage, so shifting into or out of neutral is not affected.
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On Mar 14, 1:22 am, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Uh huh. And you're so knowledgable about all the various Toyota models that you can state that for sure there isn't even a slim possibility that one of those interlocks is couldn't malfunction under conditions of either
A - the computer running amock
B - the car is under full throttle acceleration
You'd testify to that in court? You're the guy who says modern cars have only two computers and some have only one. We're still waiting for a single reference to support that nonsense. Or should we reserve final judgement until all these cars are looked at by engineers who understand the design and what controls what. Ever see the NTSB rush to pass judgement on a plane crash before a full team consisting of representatives of the manufacturer, engine maker, avionics maker, and the NTSB itself has had a year or more to analyze and make sure what really happened?
Maybe you're not aware of it, but some cars today can PARK THEMSELVES at the curb. Clearly that involves shifting the transmission in and out of drive while applying the accelerator. I suppose you're an expert on how that system works too.
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On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 06:40:24 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Since the park/brake interlock is NOT computerized, yes I would say it is impossible for any computer issues or throttle position to interfere with that process.
The only possible exception is with Hybrid Synergy Drive on the Hybrids, where neutral is electrically controlled and I am not familliar enough with the computer system there to know what could POSSIBLY happen with MULTIPLE computer level failures. They are designed that just about any single failure will fail "safe". Is there a combination of possible failures that could allow the vehicle to run but not allow BOTH throttle control and transmission disengagement? I suppose it is POSSIBLE, but it has never to my knowlenge been demonstrated and the odds against it happening on even ONE car would be extremely high.

Yes I would.

Totally aware of that.

Nope. But it is not part of any of the corollas and camrys being recalled for the sticky throttle problem.

to be at least part of the problem on the cars in question.
You WILL find that the throttle control mottor/assembly is not adequately sealed, moisture is getting into the throttle mechaism, causing corrosion, which is causing rough operation of the actuator and sticking of the throttle. it is a mechanical problem - and not an electronic problem, on the whole.
Might be a glitch in the program that is not shutting the engine down when the throttle sticks - that has not been proven yet. The corroded throttle actuator HAS been documented, on several vehicles - and NOT all Toyotas. Nissan and Infinity are also affected for sure - and quite possible other companies, including the "big three"
You read it first here.
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 07:37:42 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

IF the car has a CVT, there MAY not be a mechanical linkage. I have not been able to find a reference for sure, and have not physically looked at one to see.
Anything that has a plantary gear multi-ratio transmission DOES have a mechanical way of putting it in neutral that is totally separate from the electronic controls.
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_Stopping Procedure for Toyota Hybrid Vehicles_
Video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVcxF8rupN0&feature=popt02us13

According to Toyota, of course.
Seems some procedures take a second or three. Like holding the off button.
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Say 5 seconds to do both. Say it takes you 10 seconds to figure out you need to shut it down, that;s still only 15 seconds.
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 18:43:18 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I 'figger' anyone taking a teen driving test would know all this.
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Oren wrote:

I had a minor nose to tail accident because I forgot that the vehicle I was driving had ABS.I am so used to cadence braking in urgent situations that it is now a problem for me.
These recalls make me ponder as to whether anyone driving today knows how their vehicle works?
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 18:43:18 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

An awful lot can happen in 15 seconds. Especially at high speed on a busy road.
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On Mar 13, 3:29 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

More speculation and over reaching. How the hell can you know what all cars do or don't have? You're the guy that tried to tell us that most modern cars have only two computers and some have only one. I provided you several credible links that say that is total nonsense.
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 13:08:04 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Say what you want. I've been in the business for a long time. All you can say is nobody knows. Well, thre are peoiple out there who DO know - and I talk with a lot of them.. I don't care what you think.
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On Mar 13, 6:45 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

om>
I never said nobody knows. I said YOU don't know how all cars that have been built in the last decade are built, so you shouldn't go around making blanket statements that just make you look foolish. Certainly the engineers that designed a particular car know.

Next time you talk with them, ask them how many computers are in a modern car. Is it one or two, like you claim, or dozens of them like the website dedicated to embedded computer engineering that I provided you with as a reference says? And while you're at it, ask them if the same computer that controls the airbags controls the climate system and the radio. Obviously you haven't been in any engineering development or you'd know how highly improbable that is. Despite claiming to know so much, you can't even grasp why.
Here's a clue. Who in their right mind would want a critical real- time system that has the capability of exploding airbags in your face co-mingled with the radio? And what exactly would be the purpose of building it the way you say with everything in one computer? First, it's unlikely that those components are even designed and/or built in the same place. More likely there are completely separate engineering teams, maybe one in Japan, another in Michigan, a third in Ohio. So why would they choose to share a computer and complicate things? With microcontrollers costing as little as $1, there is no reason to co-mingle all kinds of distinctly separate functions into one module. You put the computer close to where it's needed, segment the system logically, and have the computers talk to each other if needed.
Ever do any engineering change work or code validation? Somebody decides they need to fix a tiny bug in the radio or marketing wants to add a new feature. The fix involves changing the program code. If you have a $1 microcontroller functioning as the brains for the radio and entertainment system, you can make that change, validate it with regards to the radio and not worry that it COULD result in screwing up the airbag system, killing people. Do it the way you claim, and as soon as you change that program code for the radio, you have one hell of a big system validation problem covering not just the radio, but the critical airbags, climate control and God only knows what else because you decided to put it all together. There is a reason for modular design, ie breaking things up into logical units. And maybe I'm wrong. Maybe some cars do have the same computer that runs the airbags running the radio and climate control. But I'm betting you're wrong. Just like the mainframe gave way to PCs everywhere, with cheap microcontrollers and microprocessors, it makes sense in a car to do the computing where it's needed instead of in one central place. Just show us an example of a credible source that says the airbag, radio and climate control are done with the same computer.
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On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 17:10:25 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

In the first place - my statement about the number of "computers" in a car was in reguards to the operation of the powertrain, primarily - and I did also explain there are semantics involved. Depends what you want to call a computer.
At one point, cruise control was one computer, ABS was another computer, fuel injection was another computer, and ignition another one.sunroof was another computer, the automatic transmission was another,power windows was another computer, and if you had a driver information panel or a trip computer they were both separate - as was the compass and/or climate control. Digital dash was another computer. If it had electrically operated seat belt retractor locks that was another "computer" - then you added SRS (air bags) and automatic headlights
In todays cars, the fuel injection, ignition, transmission, cruise control, antilock brakes, traction control and even the voltage regulator are commonly all handled by one main computer, while climate control, driving computer, compass, doorlocks, sunroof, compass, instrument panel and seat belts, along with wipers and numerous other functions - in many cases even the RADIO. functions are controlled by another main computer.
The fact that microprocessors are also used in many of the "smart switches" that are built into things like BMW tail-light assemblies, door and window operators etc is not under dispute, but the definition of them as computers is playing pretty loose.
Calling the air bag computer control a computer IS accurate on some cars - on others all the operational smarts are in the sensors, while the "computer" is simply a monitor that makes sure there are no defects that would prevent the air-bags from functioning in case of an accident and turning on a light and storing a code when a malfunction is determined.
A string of switches that must all be turned to the right position to activate a circuit is not necessarilly a computer.
And even calling each "smart switch" on a BMW a computer, 100 is a big stretch....
'Nuff said.

It WILL happen. and in the not too distant future.

The bean counters will make sure it happens unless legislators get their panties into enough of a knot over this toyota BS that they pass a law to stop it.


Yes, I've done some. It's a royal pain.

Ever here of virtualization? It is happening in a big way in the computer industry - and you WILL see it in automotive computers, with one computer running numerous "virtual machine" processes on one processor , and each of those "virtual machines" handling different functions, with the code for each virtual machine and each function beng totally segmented and separately modifiable.
It all has to do with the integration and convergence, By eliminating all the separate $1 microcontrollers and "converging" all the different systems on one more powerfull CPU, there are MANY benefits that can be realized. Among them is easier fault detection and reporting, easier to implement redundancy, data verification and data sharing, and in the long run lower costs.
You will see more centralized design come back into automotive manufacturing as the complexity of today's cars increases. And the programming of these processes running on these virtual machines can still be done wherever you want it to be done - Bangalore, Karachi, Mumbai, Detroit, Singapore, Mexico, Milan, or wherever.

Modular design in the computer world does not have to mean separate physical computers. Opject Oriented Programming is modular program design, and re-useable programming building blocks can be assembled to control many different processes using the same basic code snippets, with separate data tables to modify the logic.

And today you are seeing a large movement back to centralized processing with client-server applications and "thin client" networks like Citrix because it is more effective and more secure to have the data and processes centralized. Just like "single entry" accounting systems, where all the data gets entered in one place, and is processed and manipulated and stored in one place. You see more relational databases where all the information required to run a business or produce a product is stored in a single data file on a single system - and possibly replicated to a second system for redundancy and capacity sharing.
This instead of a collection of numerous files, with different types of data stored in different files all over the storage device.
It is simply easier to control and verify data that is all in the same place.

Many cars have the radio, climate control, and door locks, window controls, compass, driving computer and instrument panel all on one computer, along with part of the airbag monitoring system.
While some vehicles use a real "computer" to control the airbags,the airbag control module in some cases is not a computer at all. Simple boolean logic (and, or, not, nand etc gates) is all that is required. The module gets signals from the main (Powertrain control or body control) computer saying the conditions (speed etc) are right to enable the supplementary restraint system, and if a front impact (inertia) sensor gets tripped, it sets off the front air bags. If a rollover sensor or side impact sensor gets actuated, it sets off the side curtain airbags. No programming or computational ability is required, so it is not a computer. It is just a couple of electronic switches.
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On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 00:17:38 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Thus proving conclusively that you don't even know the basics of what constitutes a computer.
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