Roof with three layers of shingles - dangerous?

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I moved into my house not too long ago and had the first occasion to want to go up to the roof yesterday. It looks like there are three layers of shingles. I've read that you should never have more than two layers of shingles because of the weight. How much should I worry about this?
Thanks for your input, -Ben
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I'd go check with the local code officials and see what the code says. In most places you are permitted to have 2 layers, but no more. Also, in most places you need a building permit to put on new shingles. Find out if one was taken out. If the answers to both of those questions are no, then depending on the rest of the facts, like the age of the roof, I'd seriously consider going after the seller ad you could have a slam dunk case.
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wrote:

I'd go check with the local code officials and see what the code says. In most places you are permitted to have 2 layers, but no more. Also, in most places you need a building permit to put on new shingles. Find out if one was taken out. If the answers to both of those questions are no, then depending on the rest of the facts, like the age of the roof, I'd seriously consider going after the seller ad you could have a slam dunk case.
Why would the seller know anything about roofing?
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No one else has mentioned this, so I will: Make sure the spot you checked really _has_ three layers.
Some spots, like edges, have an extra layer of shingles on purpose. You also have to count carefully to avoid counting overlapping shingles in a single layer as multiple layers.
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Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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ythread wrote:

Unless someone snunk over and re-shingled his house in the dead of night, the seller knew there were three layers.
Three layers is certainly something noteworthy and maybe illegal.
On the other hand, maybe it's the third layer that's holding the house together.
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He (the seller) may have bought the house that way. He's only responsible for things he knows about. He'd have plausible deniability. If that wasn't true, almost anybody selling a home would be in serious trouble.
:-) Maybe a real estate lawyer could respond. My real estate agent said "the less you know the better".
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Not saying anything about what the seller does or doesn't know about roofing. Only that if you just bought a house and find out that
1 - The roof was recently re-done with 3 layers of shingles and this is not allowed by code, which is the case in most places
2 - No building permit, which is typically required was pulled before the roof was done.
Then you have a good case against the seller. I doubt a seller will have much luck arguing in court that their ignorance of the legal requirement of a building permit is an excuse. The seller in turn could have a case against whoever installed the roof, but it's possible they even did it themselves.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote: ...

For what?
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Having just one and only one layer is best. Shingles are heavy and can put extra stress on a roof. I've seen some really bad sagging roofs with 2,3 and 4 layers of shingles on it.
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Phisherman wrote:

I've been scratching my head, wondering how much difference another layer of shingles would make. Google knows :o) Found a website that seems to explain it well: http://www.firesafedwellings.org/roof_info/roof_weight.html
As for making a claim against the previous owner, that seems like it would be a huge waste in attorneys fees. Unless the roof caves in. I haven't read a disclosure in a long time, but if the previous owner had concealed anything, it seems the new owner wouldn't yet know about the layers of roofing. If there are really three layers of shingles, it probably is far from a hidden issue. Should be obvious from the street.
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The last disclosesures I filled out or read didn't ask anything about shingle layers. It may have asked about leaking issues. Layers could be covered in the inspection but I have two layers and there isn't a thing about that in my last inspection. Plenty of other roofing issues.
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No need for attorney's fees. You can bring this case in small claims if necessary.
Unless the roof caves in. I haven't read a

And if code says 3 layers are not allowed? And if code also says a building permit is required, but one was not pulled? And the roof is obviously new? The buyer should just roll over and accept that?
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Most jurisdictions have a limit for small claims courts and that limit may be exceeded here. Sometimes you have to actually be out the money for which you're suing which means you've got to replace the roof THEN sue to recover.
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So, what if the limit is exceeded? It's common for the small claims limit to be $5,000. Some places it's lower, maybe $3,000 and some it's as high as $10,000. If it happens to be capped at $3000, that still goes a long way towards covering the cost and would make it worth pursuing. Having the limit doesn't mean you can't bring the case to small claims, it only means any recovery is capped at that limit.
Sometimes you have to actually be out the money for which

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Phisherman wrote:

Of course it is (and where did I say or even imply it wasn't?) , but the worst problem is still (generally) the more rapid deterioration of the shingles themselves as opposed to actual risk of a roof failing. If that weren't the case, considering the number of roofing jobs done every year which are second- (or even third-layer), we'd hear of roofs collapsing every where and we don't...
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:Having just one and only one layer is best. Shingles are heavy and :can put extra stress on a roof. I've seen some really bad sagging :roofs with 2,3 and 4 layers of shingles on it.
My roof was a sad sagger before the complete tearoff of the 3 layers that were on there around 3 years ago. It's amazing how nice it looks now. All that sag is gone.
Dan
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Depending on the state laws, it *might* be something he/she could have fixed but it also would have to be really close to the selling time, not 'years later'. It would depend on the disclosure laws of the state, and the code specs for roofs.
I'd say find out first what state the OP is in before worrying about the 3 layers. Most of the USA is not actually in heavy snow-line country <g>. That seems to be the main area where 3 layers and weight is an issue.
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hey you bought the house it's yours what you gonna go after the guy for Don't waste money on attorneys
in addition some state codes will let you put three layers for example on very steep roofs and so on
And check you roof again about three layers or get a roofer to look at it free estimate for re roofing costs you nothing right?
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For the amount it takes to re-do the roof right and to code.
If you read my post, I said IF:
1 - It was recently re-roofed
2 - Code says 3 layers are not allowed
3 - A building permit was required, but not pulled.
Then you have a good case.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Not only. What if the city discovers an illegal three layers on YOUR house? Claiming someone else did it won't impress the authorities.
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