Roof with three layers of shingles - dangerous?

In many locations, the presumption is that these are issues/questions that the buyer is expected to resolve at or before closing. After the sale is complete, you don't necessarily get to retroactively address these issues.
If you read my post, I said IF:
1 - It was recently re-roofed
2 - Code says 3 layers are not allowed
3 - A building permit was required, but not pulled.
Then you have a good case.
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Ben,
Shingles have weight. Each layer of shingles puts weight on your roof structure. This structure must support this weight and the weight of other things (snow and ice come to mind). 3 layers of shingles may be too much weight for your roof structure.I 'd be concerned about the roof collapsing. I'd really worry come Winter.
Dave M.
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In addition to what the others have said, I'd pay a visit to whoever did the home inspection and kick him in the teeth. Then get your money back.
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Assuming he had a home inspector. Even so, many give the roof a cursory inspection and pronounce it good or bad and if the top layer looks good, he would not do any in depth inspecting.
As for the number of layers, there are probably tens of thousands of houses with three layers. There is the potential for problems, but I'd not act too quickly. If it has been on there for 10 years, I'd do nothing until it was time to re-roof. Not knowing the construction, none of us can say if there is serious danger from the weight. Pitch, snow load, type of rafter or truss, etc. all play a part. Just look at the weight of the older slate roofs.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote: ...

Slate roofs were certainly not placed on stick-framed houses only sized for asphalt...that's totally unrelated to the OP's situation.
I agree it's highly unlikely if it's been there any length of time there's going to be a problem tomorrow.
While weight can be a consdieration, the primary proscription on the third layer is it tends to shorten life of the new shingles from additional heat and poor conditions underneath.
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On Mon, 23 Jun 2008 10:31:10 -0500, dpb wrote:

Also, when it it time for a new roof, the roofers will charge a lot more for the tear off and haul away of a three layer roof.
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Tony Sivori
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As others have said, 3 layers is not a good idea and it does not meet most local codes. On the other hand, older homes often do turn out to have 3 layers because someone went ahead and added a 3rd layer without doing the tear-off that should have been done first. If you had a home inspection done before the purchase, that definitely would have given you the info on the status of the roof. As far as trying to go back now and stick it to the seller, that's doubtful at this point. The fact that you were now able to discover the status of the roof by checking on your own means you could have done the same thing before you bought the property.
If you don't see any evidence of sagging, and the roof seems to be in good shape and is not leaking, you may not need to do anything. If you are getting close to needing a new roof anyway, it would probably make sense to go ahead and get estimates and have it done now before this coming winter.
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"LJP" wrote

Keep in mind that he may be south of the snow-line and if so, 3 layers is allowed. We don't have the snow weight issues.
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Ben wrote:

Before doing anything else, confirm that you DO have three layers of shingles.
It sounds like you don't have much experience examining roofs (and there's nothing wrong with that ;) ) so get a roofer or other knowledgeable pro out to confirm. THEN decide what, if anything, you should expect from, or need to do to, your roof.
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1) Please don't say you are in ME, NH, VT or Buffalo.
2) Wear a hardhat in the attic.
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Maybe even in the basement. :)
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wrote:
:I moved into my house not too long ago and had the first occasion to :want to go up to the roof yesterday. It looks like there are three :layers of shingles. I've read that you should never have more than :two layers of shingles because of the weight. How much should I worry :about this? : :Thanks for your input, :-Ben
My understanding is that 3 layers is maximum, i.e. if a roof with 3 layers needs reroofing, a complete tearoff is the first step. This is what happened when my roof was redone around 3 years ago. Judging from this thread, many if not most areas now require no more than 2 layers. As noted, make sure about your assessment of how many layers are on there.
Dan
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replying to Ben, uglyhouse101 wrote: This should have been caught When you had your home inspection during your Due Dilligence period. Home Inspectors look critically at roofs for such issues. I would read through your home inspection report and contact them if you still have any concerns. They can come out and explain what you are seeing.
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On Friday, June 23, 2017 at 8:14:06 AM UTC-4, uglyhouse101 wrote:

And they will also explain how even if they missed it, their contract says that you can't come after them.
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 23 Jun 2017 07:54:21 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

Yes, aad I know of home inspectors that don't go up on the roof, so if you didn't see it before you bought the house, neither did he. Too bad, so sad.
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wrote:

For an intelligent homebuyer like most on this list, the majority of home inspections are a TOTAL waste of money and time. Better to take a few of your good buddies along to look at the house _ they are likely to catch more than the inspectors will, and you'll be buying them a few beers anyway.
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On Sunday, June 25, 2017 at 1:30:28 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I would disagree. In most cases you can recover the cost of the home inspection and then some in reductions from the seller. And it's a lot more likely a seller is going to knock off $1000 for things that an inspector finds than those that a buyer and his buddies claim need addressing. It's worked for me.
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On 6/25/2017 1:48 PM, trader_4 wrote:

That seems to be the main reason inspections are done and some lenders require it too. When I was buying you did your own inspection and maybe brought along dad or an uncle. Never used one so I don't now the real value of their work.
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I've done the "pre-inspection" for several people who then hired a home inspector who missed every serious issue I pointed out, and caught a few things like cracked switch plates and poorly attached trim, and a missing crank on a casement window - missing the fact that the "redone" wiring was a total disaster and the roof, although it looked good from a distance, was about 5 years past it's "best before date" with serious issues in the valleys. Not to mention one of the carport posts was not carrying any weight because it was roted off under the recent aluminum cladding, and the asphault driveway was almost the consistency of gravel. ( that's just on the latest one) A total waste of, IIRC, $450.
There is ONE home inspector in the area I would trust to do an adequate home inspection - a former building contractor and developer who's been raising a bit of a "shit storm" in the provincial property inspection circles for several years. Real estate selling agents are not happy when he's on the job.
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On Sunday, June 25, 2017 at 3:38:37 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My son had 2 home inspections done in Las Vegas. The most complete inspection reports I have ever seen. Every issue was detailed in text in the synopsis section, then the text for each issue was repeated next a photo or photos of the issue with the issue circled in red or yellow depending on the severity.
Here's a couple of examples. 3 images of a single cracked roof tile:
http://i.imgur.com/iRwPLh7.jpg
Items that had no issues, like the laundry equipment, were included also.
http://i.imgur.com/Pg6WHm5.jpg
All for the very reasonable price of $250. The detailed description and pictures of all the problems with just the pool at one house made the $250 seem like a really great deal. He walked away from that one based solely on the inspection report.
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