RFID credit/debit cards

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Have you heard about them? If not, you might want to watch the video below. Me, I'll be wrapping my cards with aluminum foil when/if they get RFID.
http://youtube.googleapis.com/v/lLAFhTjsQHw%26sns=em
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On 1/31/2014 8:35 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Yes, there have been several expose' about RFID credit or debit cards. The RFID is often visible if you really look closely. These can be scanned by hackers with briefcase size scanners. If someone sends me RFID card, I'm going to either punch it with a sheet metal punch, or drill with a cordless drill. The foil pouches, might work. Might not.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

My debit card came in a sleeve that has a foil layer between 2 layers of paper . Not sure if it's got an RFID chip or not .
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On 1/31/2014 10:07 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

The expose showed that if you look closely at the back of the card (might need magnifying lens) you can see the shadow of the RFID chip, and sometimes can see the antenna web.
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On 1/31/2014 8:13 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

So you'll destroy the far more secure option to continue with the massively insecure option that led to the huge data breach at Target. Yeah, that level of ignorance is about your speed.
A magnetic stripe card contains the card holder's name, the credit card number, the expiration date, and the credit verification value (CVV). Grab that information (which is childishly easy to do with magstrip cards) and the card can then be cloned and used anywhere. That's why hackers target US credit cards and US retail operations, because US credit card companies have continued to use these insecure magstripe cards.
Infosecurity magazine, about the vastly more secure RFID credit cards:
There are two primary security measures that credit companies use to secure information on RFID credit cards: generating a unique transaction number each time the card is read by a scanner and restricting the distance that the card can be read to between one and four inches.
“There are only three pieces of information that are captured by the RFID terminal: card number, expiration date, and a control number that is generated per transaction by the chip based on the information that the RFID terminals sends to the card. It’s a unique number and it changes every time. If you were to capture the control number and try to use that information two minutes from now, it wouldn’t be viable”, Foley explained.
The RFID reader does not capture the name, address, or other personal information that is included on a credit card with a magnetic strip, he related.
http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/view/16393/rfid-credit-cards-are-more-secure-than-magnetic-strip-cards-says-itrc/
Got that?
1. The magnetic stripe is the huge security hole on credit cards. Cards that combine an RFID chip and a magnetic stripe have enhanced security due to the unique CVV for each transaction. The most secure cards are RFID only, no magnetic stripe. 2. The RFID can only be scanned from a distance of 1-4 inches. 3. The RFID generates a new, unique CVV to validate each transaction. Cloning the card won't work, because a cloned card will only have the single CVV that is printed on the card and contained within the magnetic stripe - and that can only be used once.
So yeah, stick to your highly-insecure magnetic stripe, because you're afraid of RFID. Idiot. Your card is more at risk using the old technology than it will be with the new.
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Moe DeLoughan wrote: "So yeah, stick to your highly-insecure magnetic stripe, because you're afraid of RFID. Idiot. Your card is more at risk using the old ..."
I prefer NEITHER.
As I mentioned earlier there is also a holographic feature on the front side of cards, been there for 20 years.
Holo is far less subject to the wear of a mag-stripe, and it cannot be breached via wireless detection means. It's time to exploit holo's full potential.
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On 2/3/2014 8:52 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Counterfeiting standard holograms is child's play, which is why they're found on so many counterfeit products, including credit cards. Yes, they can be made more secure, but then the cost per hologram goes from pennies to dollars, which limits their use on a wide scale.
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On 2/3/2014 8:30 AM, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

In the video, the guy got the credit card number and expiration number and cloned a new card. He did not get the security code, because a valid security code is not included in the scanned information. If the security code is required, as it probably is for all on-line purchases, the credit card number is useless. For point-of-sale terminals - which was used in the video - a security number is seldom (ever?) required (would be punched in manually), so the cloned card can be used.
With the European chip system (EMV - Europay, MasterCard, Visa), scanning the card gives you information that is encoded, changes every time, and can only be used once. It is completely different from what is on a mag-strip, so you can't clone it to mag-strip. (I don't think you could clone it to a chip and use that once either.)
EMV is coming to the US. After 10-1-15 fraudulent charges from a mag-stripe reader will be the responsibility of the merchant, not the credit card company. After that date using a mag-card should be rather difficult.
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wrote:

That's a false choice.

Irrelevant. The Mag stripe is needed. The chip isn't. <more irrelevance snipped>
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dadiOH wrote:

http://www.thinkgeek.com/product/8cdd/
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Just destroy the RFID circuit, easy.
Use a hammer and a towel, find the little dimple on the card where the chip is located, cover the hammerhead with the towel, whack the shit out of the dimple.
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On 1/31/2014 10:28 AM, Lab Lover wrote:

Hammer and pin punch. Hammer and phillips screw driver. Drill with small bit. Etc....
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On 1/31/2014 10:28 AM, Lab Lover wrote:

How about metal foil tape used for ducts? You could peel a small piece and stick it over the chip.
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On 1/31/2014 11:07 AM, Meanie wrote:

This isn't email, it's usenet.
Have to cover the RFID antenna area, on both sides of the card. And probably the edges, too. So no RF energy gets to the antenna.
You foil tape your chip if you want. I'm going to use my hole punch and take it right out.
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On Fri, 31 Jan 2014 11:12:33 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Just use some transparent aluminum tape. I think Scotty has some.
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Stormin Mormon wrote: "This isn't email, it's usenet. "
I'm sure Meanie knows that. Boiler plate signature, that's all!
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You can try it, but as the RFID operates at a very high frequency, the signal could travel through the edge of the card where there is no foil.
What is wrong with the hammer? It even works on passports and leaves no visible signs of tampering.
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Don't think this is right. If it were a high frequency, they wouldn't need a multi-loop antenna a third the size of the credit card. Given the shape antenna, no matter the frequency, any edge radiation will be miniscule. AFAIK, all credit cars use 13.56MHz.

That sounds like an invitation for a free colonoscopy.
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On Fri, 31 Jan 2014 13:25:44 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

You are right, I was wrong. ISO 14443 13.56mhz

Maybe so, but some may enjoy that.
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You are right, I was wrong.
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