Resurrecting sealed lead acid batteries for outside home equipment (gate)

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The lawn mower chewed up the 18 volt AC wire going to the driveway gate about a year ago and I just got around to fixing it.
Both batteries inside were new a year ago but both are dead as a doorknob.
I've had a 6amp 14-volt battery charger on them for two days and still, less than a volt (and no current on the gauge).
What does it take to resurrect sealed lead acid batteries? (Model RB500 & UT1270)
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On Fri 29 Jul 2011 07:11:53p, SF Man told us...

The attention you should have given it a year ago. Duh!
--

~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
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SF Man wrote:

Hi, Forget the batteries. They are toast. How about installing solar panel to trickle charge new batteries during day time.
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On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 23:11:24 -0600, Tony Hwang wrote:

That 'would' have worked! The problem was my fault, for mowing over the barely buried wires; and, of course, for leaving the batteries off the charger for so long.
I just didn't realize these sealed 'dry' 7 amp 12 volt lead-acid batteries were so fragile.
I even tried putting 120 volts across the terminals with a jumper wire; but even that failed to resurrect the batteries. They've been on the trickle charger for days - and absolutely nothing. Not even heat!
The fact there's no current and no heat and no open-source voltage tells me they must have developed an 'open' somehow.
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What the hell do you mean "fragile?" You left the batteries out there for a YEAR, probably with a parasitic load on them from the gate electronics.
There is no lead acid battery that can be resurrected from being drawn completely down to 0 Volts, and held there for months.
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On 8/2/2011 11:37 AM, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

I believe the Firefly lead acid batteries would survive. Check out the technology on their site.
http://www.fireflyenergy.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&idI&Itemide
http://preview.tinyurl.com/yptegj
TDD
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wrote:

I doubt it. This guy's batteries probably got drawn down to 0 in the firts month or two. And sat dead from then till now. No lead acid battery is going to survive that.
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On 8/24/2011 11:03 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

There is quite a difference in the plate structure of the Firefly batteries compared to conventional lead acid batteries. I may Email the company with an inquiry about deep discharge of their product.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

Deep discharge was not the problem. If you re-charge immediately after deep discharge, there is not much of a problem. Hoever if you wait several months, even a high quality battery is toast.
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On 8/28/2011 4:50 PM, Sjouke Burry wrote:

Did you read about the Firefly technology, it's a bit different from conventional lead acid batteries?
TDD
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wrote:

It's still using the same chemical storage. Leave it dead for 10 months and it's toast.
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A crowbar usually works. (You use it to open your wallet)
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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On Sun, 31 Jul 2011 03:29:22 +0000 (UTC), Larry W wrote:

You're not kidding!
They seem to cost about $60!
GTO RB500 7 amp 12 volt battery = $29 + 10% tax + shipping: http://www.gateopenersunlimited.com/GTO-Battery-Kits-Replacement-Batteries.html
UltraTech UT1270 7 amp 12 volt battery = $29 + 10% tax + shipping: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
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wrote:

Find a local battery supplier - my local battery wholesaler supplies me with 7.5 and 8 anp 12 volt batteries for $16.50 Canadian each plus tax.No shipping required.
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On Aug 1, 9:29pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

or use 2 riding mower battery
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On Aug 1, 9:29pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

i like the idea of a solar charger for this application
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august 5th and google groups still broke last post august 1st.......
they suck.......
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On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 20:10:29 -0700, Bob F wrote:

It's something I've heard many a time, and which appears true :-) But, just out of interest, what is it that actually fails in these types of batteries when they've been left idle for long periods?
cheers
Jules
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On Sun, 31 Jul 2011 12:48:08 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

Corrosion and sulfation, primarily. The plates of deeply discharged flooded-cell starter batteries can warp and short, as well.
http://www.fireflyenergy.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id 0&Itemid
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On Sun, 31 Jul 2011 12:48:08 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

The plates "harden" - the sulphate cannot be driven back out - and sometimes they get dead enough to actually freeze - or they dry out/swell. This is mostly from high temperatures, which means they would go bad even if they were being charged. Some brands are a lot worse than others for this kind of failure.
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