Reroof flat roofed one car garage -- Metal?

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I'm in Berkeley, CA. The winters are mild, no snow, but there are nights when there's ice on outside surfaces in the morning.
The garage roof (typical) is totally wasted. For the last several years I've been keeping water out of the single car garage (manual door, I don't keep a car in it, use it for storage) by putting on a fresh tarp (19' x 29') yearly. Of course, this entails buying a ~$50 tarp every year and taking 1/2 a day to replace last year's tarp. I tie down the corners and hang bricks every 8 feet or so from the grommets, to secure the tarp from the ravages of the winds. One wall of the garage needs a total rebuild, and I may try to do that myself, maybe hire somebody, maybe work with them.
When I had the house reroofed with 50 year asphalt shingles (total tearoff) around 3-4 years ago I didn't think to ask the roofing company how much they'd charge to replace the roof on my garage. Even then, I had it in mind that I could maybe install metal roofing on it myself. I'd never think of doing a tar job myself, but metal I figure "why not?"
The roof is flat (about 10' x 24') but I think there's a slight slope to it, being 1/4 inch height for every 2 feet of run (I'm going to measure the slope more carefully using a line level). On the low side right now is a rusted out old gutter, which I figure I could replace myself after installing the metal panels. The rafters are every 2 feet, 2x6's, and look to be in good shape. But the plywood (there's some 1x6 boards too!) is basically trashed, so I'd have to replace that stuff, or maybe not if I nail on nailing strips for metal roofing, no big deal either way. I have basic tools like a circle saw, saw horses, ladders, etc. and a concrete courtyard to work in.
1. Is it feasible for me to do this myself, and
2. How much would the materials cost?
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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Dan Musicant wrote:

Yes
If you are going to rebuild one wall, why not make use of the opportunity to remove the roof, rebuild the wall - I know not which - and at the same time put a greater fall to the roof.
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:Dan Musicant wrote: :> I'm in Berkeley, CA. The winters are mild, no snow, but there are :> nights when there's ice on outside surfaces in the morning. :> :> The garage roof (typical) is totally wasted. For the last several :> years I've been keeping water out of the single car garage (manual :> door, I don't keep a car in it, use it for storage) by putting on a :> fresh tarp (19' x 29') yearly. Of course, this entails buying a ~$50 :> tarp every year and taking 1/2 a day to replace last year's tarp. I :> tie down the corners and hang bricks every 8 feet or so from the :> grommets, to secure the tarp from the ravages of the winds. One wall :> of the garage needs a total rebuild, and I may try to do that myself, :> maybe hire somebody, maybe work with them. :> :> When I had the house reroofed with 50 year asphalt shingles (total :> tearoff) around 3-4 years ago I didn't think to ask the roofing :> company how much they'd charge to replace the roof on my garage. Even :> then, I had it in mind that I could maybe install metal roofing on it :> myself. I'd never think of doing a tar job myself, but metal I figure :> "why not?" :> :> The roof is flat (about 10' x 24') but I think there's a slight slope :> to it, being 1/4 inch height for every 2 feet of run (I'm going to :> measure the slope more carefully using a line level). On the low side :> right now is a rusted out old gutter, which I figure I could replace :> myself after installing the metal panels. The rafters are every 2 :> feet, 2x6's, and look to be in good shape. But the plywood (there's :> some 1x6 boards too!) is basically trashed, so I'd have to replace :> that stuff, or maybe not if I nail on nailing strips for metal :> roofing, no big deal either way. I have basic tools like a circle :> saw, saw horses, ladders, etc. and a concrete courtyard to work in. :> :> 1. Is it feasible for me to do this myself, and : :Yes :> :> 2. How much would the materials cost? : :If you are going to rebuild one wall, why not make use of the opportunity to :remove the roof, rebuild the wall - I know not which - and at the same time :put a greater fall to the roof.
Interesting idea. The wall is the side wall, the one at the low end of the slight slope, so it has the rusted out gutter at the top.
To make the slope greater I'd have to shim the rafters, gradually, more and more toward the other wall before attaching he nailing strips for the metal panels.
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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Dan Musicant wrote:

Could you lower that wall without losing too much height inside, or would that cause other problems with two other walls?
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:Dan Musicant wrote:
:> wrote: :> :>> Dan Musicant wrote: :>>> I'm in Berkeley, CA. The winters are mild, no snow, but there are :>>> nights when there's ice on outside surfaces in the morning. :>>> :>>> The garage roof (typical) is totally wasted. For the last several :>>> years I've been keeping water out of the single car garage (manual :>>> door, I don't keep a car in it, use it for storage) by putting on a :>>> fresh tarp (19' x 29') yearly. Of course, this entails buying a ~$50 :>>> tarp every year and taking 1/2 a day to replace last year's tarp. I :>>> tie down the corners and hang bricks every 8 feet or so from the :>>> grommets, to secure the tarp from the ravages of the winds. One wall :>>> of the garage needs a total rebuild, and I may try to do that :>>> myself, maybe hire somebody, maybe work with them. :>>> :>>> When I had the house reroofed with 50 year asphalt shingles (total :>>> tearoff) around 3-4 years ago I didn't think to ask the roofing :>>> company how much they'd charge to replace the roof on my garage. :>>> Even then, I had it in mind that I could maybe install metal :>>> roofing on it myself. I'd never think of doing a tar job myself, :>>> but metal I figure "why not?" :>>> :>>> The roof is flat (about 10' x 24') but I think there's a slight :>>> slope to it, being 1/4 inch height for every 2 feet of run (I'm :>>> going to measure the slope more carefully using a line level). On :>>> the low side right now is a rusted out old gutter, which I figure I :>>> could replace myself after installing the metal panels. The rafters :>>> are every 2 feet, 2x6's, and look to be in good shape. But the :>>> plywood (there's some 1x6 boards too!) is basically trashed, so I'd :>>> have to replace that stuff, or maybe not if I nail on nailing :>>> strips for metal roofing, no big deal either way. I have basic :>>> tools like a circle saw, saw horses, ladders, etc. and a concrete :>>> courtyard to work in. :>>> :>>> 1. Is it feasible for me to do this myself, and :>> :>> Yes :>>> :>>> 2. How much would the materials cost? :>> :>> If you are going to rebuild one wall, why not make use of the :>> opportunity to remove the roof, rebuild the wall - I know not which :>> - and at the same time put a greater fall to the roof. :> :> Interesting idea. The wall is the side wall, the one at the low end of :> the slight slope, so it has the rusted out gutter at the top. :> :> To make the slope greater I'd have to shim the rafters, gradually, :> more and more toward the other wall before attaching he nailing :> strips for the metal panels. : :Could you lower that wall without losing too much height inside, or would :that cause other problems with two other walls?
Don't know. What I see is that I think I'd need to attach strips to the tops of the rafters (there are 14 of them that run the width of the 10 foot wide garage), and those strips should vary continuously from 0 thickness at one end to at least 1.5 inches at the other. If I go to the trouble to make (or order) them, I should probably go for more than 1.5 inches and get additional slope to the minimal. The strips would be the width of the 2x6 rafters and I'd attach the new plywood or OSB to the tops of them.
Dan :
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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Dan Musicant wrote:

That's another way to skin the cat.
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wrote:

Re: my "put on a pitched roof" post - missed it was Berkely. I'd still put more than minimum pitch on it, but no snow load and minimal rain I'd just pull the old roof sheathing off, and cut 2X6 lumber in half, corner to corner to form a wedge (2 out of each peice) and spike that down on top of existing rafters (assuming they are sound), strap across the rafters and put down formed sheet steel or aluminum roofing. Should be able to buy it in lengths to fit with no joints and just nail it down.
Then frame up the bad side wall and put the same metal vertical on the wall like on a pole barn. Available pre-coated in just about any color you would want, and will pretty well out live you.
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On Wed, 07 Oct 2009 19:25:02 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
:wrote: : :>Dan Musicant wrote: :>> I'm in Berkeley, CA. The winters are mild, no snow, but there are :>> nights when there's ice on outside surfaces in the morning. :>> :>> The garage roof (typical) is totally wasted. For the last several :>> years I've been keeping water out of the single car garage (manual :>> door, I don't keep a car in it, use it for storage) by putting on a :>> fresh tarp (19' x 29') yearly. Of course, this entails buying a ~$50 :>> tarp every year and taking 1/2 a day to replace last year's tarp. I :>> tie down the corners and hang bricks every 8 feet or so from the :>> grommets, to secure the tarp from the ravages of the winds. One wall :>> of the garage needs a total rebuild, and I may try to do that myself, :>> maybe hire somebody, maybe work with them. :>> :>> When I had the house reroofed with 50 year asphalt shingles (total :>> tearoff) around 3-4 years ago I didn't think to ask the roofing :>> company how much they'd charge to replace the roof on my garage. Even :>> then, I had it in mind that I could maybe install metal roofing on it :>> myself. I'd never think of doing a tar job myself, but metal I figure :>> "why not?" :>> :>> The roof is flat (about 10' x 24') but I think there's a slight slope :>> to it, being 1/4 inch height for every 2 feet of run (I'm going to :>> measure the slope more carefully using a line level). On the low side :>> right now is a rusted out old gutter, which I figure I could replace :>> myself after installing the metal panels. The rafters are every 2 :>> feet, 2x6's, and look to be in good shape. But the plywood (there's :>> some 1x6 boards too!) is basically trashed, so I'd have to replace :>> that stuff, or maybe not if I nail on nailing strips for metal :>> roofing, no big deal either way. I have basic tools like a circle :>> saw, saw horses, ladders, etc. and a concrete courtyard to work in. :>> :>> 1. Is it feasible for me to do this myself, and :> :>Yes :>> :>> 2. How much would the materials cost? :> :>If you are going to rebuild one wall, why not make use of the opportunity to :>remove the roof, rebuild the wall - I know not which - and at the same time :>put a greater fall to the roof. :> : Re: my "put on a pitched roof" post - missed it was Berkely. I'd :still put more than minimum pitch on it, but no snow load and minimal :rain I'd just pull the old roof sheathing off, and cut 2X6 lumber in :half, corner to corner to form a wedge (2 out of each peice) and :spike that down on top of existing rafters (assuming they are sound), :strap across the rafters and put down formed sheet steel or aluminum :roofing. Should be able to buy it in lengths to fit with no joints and :just nail it down. : :Then frame up the bad side wall and put the same metal vertical on the :wall like on a pole barn. Available pre-coated in just about any color :you would want, and will pretty well out live you.
This sounds pretty good. I think I understand what you are saying, but I wonder what exactly you mean by "Strap across the rafters." When you say that the formed sheet steel or aluminum won't need jointing, what do you mean? The roof top is actually about 10 feet by 25 feet (measured yesterday after posting). I kind of like your pragmatic approach, especially the metal siding idea. It seems easier by far and I wouldn't have to worry about protecting a lot of wood in the future from moisture intrusion and rot, paint on wood issues, etc. I might dispense with the windows on there. I'd have to replace the glass, make sure the one window that opens (crank!), works OK, and I figure the upside of light isn't worth the downside of any possible potential of a thief breaking in to grab ladders or tools they see through the windows. I've lost a few tools in my backyard over the years and don't tempt thieves if I can help it.
Any links to the metal sheeting, would be nice, and thanks!
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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wrote:

When putting on a tin roof, you run 1X4 or 1X6 boards over the rafters at right angles to support the tin roof.

The sheets will be 10 feet, or 10'6", whatever you need, so no joints on the 10 ft length.

Just google "barn siding"

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Dan-
I have a patio cover 10 x 22' (solid sheathed) that I replaced a couple years. It was originally (1930) sheathed with 6" T&G & covered with wood shingles. The pitch was less than 1:12 and of course never really "worked" but "hey, how much rain does SoCal get?"
I increased the pitch to 1:12 (~4.7 / 5 deg) and used roll roofing, no leaks.
At a pitch of 1/4" per 2 feet, your garage is even less than the code minimum of 1/4" per foot for a "flat roof". That's why the plywood is trashed.
I assume the garage (shed style) pitches across the 10' direction? At a bare minimum you need 2.5" preferably more. But, if framing is sound & solid and you use some decent thickness plywood or osb you can go minimal with the pitch (ponding will not be a problem).
I would like more like 1/2" or 1" per foot but that would require some framing changes (maybe just custom sleepers) and more than a bit of new timber, unless oyu can easily "raise the roof" .....well at least on one edge. Plus depending on how the garage is finished on the exterior; stucco, siding, ?? modifying the roof pitch will complicate things
wrt cost;
material prices are down but if you're considering doing this project yourself. To execute it successfully, you should have the minimal skills needed to develop a design, do a material take off and get some pricing.
Putting a new roof over plywood that is "basically trashed" (imo) would be a waste of your time & the material. Even with decent thickness plywood its only a couple $100's for material.
Since oyu live in the PR of Berkeley is this going to be a permit job or bootleg?
I'm surprised you haven't connected with Wayne...he lives in Berkeley & has done a LOT on his house and could offer good advice (sorry Wayne) :)
cheers Bob
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ps
Dan-
My younger son just moved from Berkeley to SF. I could have stopped by for a look on my semi-frequent visits but now Berkeley is off my radar. Also since the rainy season (we hope) is approaching...is this not better done next year?
cheers Bob
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wrote:
:ps : :Dan- : :My younger son just moved from Berkeley to SF. I could have stopped :by for a look on my semi-frequent visits but now Berkeley is off my :radar. Also since the rainy season (we hope) is approaching...is this :not better done next year? : :cheers :Bob
Yes, no question, I'm thinking next year at the soonest. I'm just thinking that I'd like to do some research and hopefully planning now. I started thinking about a metal roof on it back in 2000 or so, saved some posts, but not done anything about it. Put a new tarp on a few days ago.
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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wrote:
:> I'm in Berkeley, CA. The winters are mild, no snow, but there are nights :> when there's ice on outside surfaces in the morning. :> :> The garage roof (typical) is totally wasted. For the last several years :> I've been keeping water out of the single car garage (manual door, I :> don't keep a car in it, use it for storage) by putting on a fresh tarp :> (19' x 29') yearly. Of course, this entails buying a ~$50 tarp every :> year and taking 1/2 a day to replace last year's tarp. I tie down the :> corners and hang bricks every 8 feet or so from the grommets, to secure :> the tarp from the ravages of the winds. One wall of the garage needs a :> total rebuild, and I may try to do that myself, maybe hire somebody, :> maybe work with them. :> :> When I had the house reroofed with 50 year asphalt shingles (total :> tearoff) around 3-4 years ago I didn't think to ask the roofing company :> how much they'd charge to replace the roof on my garage. Even then, I :> had it in mind that I could maybe install metal roofing on it myself. :> I'd never think of doing a tar job myself, but metal I figure "why not?" :> :> The roof is flat (about 10' x 24') but I think there's a slight slope to :> it, being 1/4 inch height for every 2 feet of run (I'm going to measure :> the slope more carefully using a line level). On the low side right now :> is a rusted out old gutter, which I figure I could replace myself after :> installing the metal panels. The rafters are every 2 feet, 2x6's, and :> look to be in good shape. But the plywood (there's some 1x6 boards too!) :> is basically trashed, so I'd have to replace that stuff, or maybe not if :> I nail on nailing strips for metal roofing, no big deal either way. I :> have basic tools like a circle saw, saw horses, ladders, etc. and a :> concrete courtyard to work in. :> :> 1. Is it feasible for me to do this myself, and :> :> 2. How much would the materials cost? :> :> Dan :> :> Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net : :Dan- : :I have a patio cover 10 x 22' (solid sheathed) that I replaced a :couple years. It was originally (1930) sheathed with 6" T&G & :covered with wood shingles. The pitch was less than 1:12 and of :course never really "worked" but "hey, how much rain does SoCal :get?"
Yeah, I grew up in L.A. and I have relatives from Santa Barbara all the way down to where you can see Mexico from the porch (La Mesa)! Not a lot of rain. But when I lived in West L.A. I remember that just about every year there was one day when it rained steadily all day. : :I increased the pitch to 1:12 (~4.7 / 5 deg) and used roll roofing, :no leaks. : :At a pitch of 1/4" per 2 feet, your garage is even less than the code :minimum of 1/4" per foot for a "flat roof". That's why the plywood is :trashed.
Yeah, there's much about the property that's not code. It's no surprise to me, but I didn't know that code is minimal 1/4" per foot. : :I assume the garage (shed style) pitches across the 10' direction?
Yes.
:At a bare minimum you need 2.5" preferably more.
Yep, that would be code.
:But, if framing is sound & solid and you use some decent thickness :plywood or osb you can go minimal with the pitch (ponding will not be :a problem). : :I would like more like 1/2" or 1" per foot but that would require :some framing changes (maybe just custom sleepers) and more than a bit :of new timber, unless oyu can easily "raise the roof" .....well at :least on one edge. Plus depending on how the garage is finished on :the exterior; stucco, siding, ?? modifying the roof pitch will :complicate things
Back and the high side are cinder blocks, period, and they seem solid and the mortar seems great AFAIK. The bad wall is wood, has two windows (mostly broken out), and the wood's totally delapidated. Someone slapped all kinds of stuff on that wall including plywood, a couple of old doors behind a large broken out window, the works! That one side is really shabby. In fact, when I bought the house I didn't have a key to the garage and I got into it initially by going through a hole in the bad wall! It allows for ventilation on the occasions when he tarp has leaked into the garage. It also lets in animals such as cats, squirrels and who knows what!
I think the worst problem with the garage right now is the concrete floor. It's been messed with evidently by a close-by large plum tree. However, it doesn't seem to be presenting an immediate problem. A slab near the door (I totally renovated that door with new springs, plywood, paint and lock) is raised around 3 inches, I think! : :wrt cost; : :material prices are down but if you're considering doing this project :yourself. To execute it successfully, you should have the minimal :skills needed to develop a design, do a material take off and get some :pricing. : :Putting a new roof over plywood that is "basically trashed" (imo) :would be a waste of your time & the material. :Even with decent thickness plywood its only a couple $100's for :material. : :Since oyu live in the PR of Berkeley is this going to be a permit job :or bootleg?
Don't know about that. Berkeley is kind of a bitch for permitting although I could maybe slog through it. : :I'm surprised you haven't connected with Wayne...he lives in Berkeley :& has done a LOT on his house and could offer good advice (sorry :Wayne) ::)
Wayne and I are friendly, have visited each other's house several times, although I haven't seen him in quite a while. He helped me when I was having the house reroofed. I met him here. He's very astute and grounded, knows a lot about a lot of things, is very good at researching his projects and planning them. Does very good work.
Dan
:cheers :Bob : :
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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wrote:

Put up a gable or shed roof and shingle it. Cheaper than ANY flat roof alternative averaged over 5 years - much less 15.
A 10 foot wide roof is SIMPLE to make "trusses" for - use 12 foot 2X4 to give 1 foot overhang on each side or 14 ft to get 2 foot overhang and use standard 2X4 studs for rafters - about $2 each - spaced at 12 inch on centers would be more than adequate with an 8/12 pitch just about anywhere.. Thats About $100 for rafters and likey $75 for the cross stringers. Add 1X6 facsia boards and the sheathing of your choice , plus roofing felt and shingles. Likely about $700 to do the job. - Or frame as above , put 1X4 stringers across and nail down formed steel sheet roofing. You need to close in the gables with something - but definitely cheaper and more durable than ANY flat roof.

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On Wed, 07 Oct 2009 19:15:47 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
:wrote: : :>I'm in Berkeley, CA. The winters are mild, no snow, but there are nights :>when there's ice on outside surfaces in the morning. :> :>The garage roof (typical) is totally wasted. For the last several years :>I've been keeping water out of the single car garage (manual door, I :>don't keep a car in it, use it for storage) by putting on a fresh tarp :>(19' x 29') yearly. Of course, this entails buying a ~$50 tarp every :>year and taking 1/2 a day to replace last year's tarp. I tie down the :>corners and hang bricks every 8 feet or so from the grommets, to secure :>the tarp from the ravages of the winds. One wall of the garage needs a :>total rebuild, and I may try to do that myself, maybe hire somebody, :>maybe work with them. :> :>When I had the house reroofed with 50 year asphalt shingles (total :>tearoff) around 3-4 years ago I didn't think to ask the roofing company :>how much they'd charge to replace the roof on my garage. Even then, I :>had it in mind that I could maybe install metal roofing on it myself. :>I'd never think of doing a tar job myself, but metal I figure "why not?" :> :>The roof is flat (about 10' x 24') but I think there's a slight slope to :>it, being 1/4 inch height for every 2 feet of run (I'm going to measure :>the slope more carefully using a line level). On the low side right now :>is a rusted out old gutter, which I figure I could replace myself after :>installing the metal panels. The rafters are every 2 feet, 2x6's, and :>look to be in good shape. But the plywood (there's some 1x6 boards too!) :>is basically trashed, so I'd have to replace that stuff, or maybe not if :>I nail on nailing strips for metal roofing, no big deal either way. I :>have basic tools like a circle saw, saw horses, ladders, etc. and a :>concrete courtyard to work in. :> :>1. Is it feasible for me to do this myself, and :> :>2. How much would the materials cost? :> :>Dan :> : :Put up a gable or shed roof and shingle it. :Cheaper than ANY flat roof alternative averaged over 5 years - much :less 15. : :A 10 foot wide roof is SIMPLE to make "trusses" for - use 12 foot 2X4 :to give 1 foot overhang on each side or 14 ft to get 2 foot overhang :and use standard 2X4 studs for rafters - about $2 each - spaced at 12 :inch on centers would be more than adequate with an 8/12 pitch just :about anywhere.. Thats About $100 for rafters and likey $75 for the :cross stringers. Add 1X6 facsia boards and the sheathing of your :choice , plus roofing felt and shingles. Likely about $700 to do the :job. - Or frame as above , put 1X4 stringers across and nail down :formed steel sheet roofing. :You need to close in the gables with something - but definitely :cheaper and more durable than ANY flat roof.
Ah, I'm having a little trouble visualizing this, but if I bring your description to a lumberyard I bet someone there could make a drawing for me pretty easily. I think I mostly know what you're describing but I want to make sure.
I've thought about building a gabled roof for it ever since they reroofed my house. I realized then that a gabled roof isn't very complicated and would last much longer than a retarred flat roof on the garage. Your description is great. By 1x6 fascia boards, you mean 1x6s that would stretch across the rafters and be right under the sheathing, which would probably be something like 1/2" plywood or OSB. The fascia boards would give strength.
I like the metal idea if it isn't too expensive. I could handle the asphalt tiles, but that's more complicated.
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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wrote:

Correct
Up here in Waterloo County Ontario, a sheet steel roof is SIGNIFICANTLY cheaper than asphalt tile. No sheathing required either.
I can have a guy up the road crank out sheets in any length I need - 30 feet is NOTHING. - in pretty much any standard colour, and in 3 or 4 different profiles. He gets the steel in flat coils and forms it with a roller unit on the farm ("Old Order" Mennonite farm based business - they build a lot of barns and driving sheds with it, as well as roofing a lot of farm houses.)

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Dan Musicant wrote:

Some things you only want to do once. I'd demo all the existing rotten wood, and build back with a new wall and properly pitched roof above, at least 3-12. Maybe add some recycled windows on the high side, above the block, to keep the place nice and bright inside.(Habitat ReStore around here usually has a selection of dirt-cheap salvage windows that would be perfect for that.) For a mild climate like that, I wouldn't even bother with wood decking- 2x6 or 2x8 rafters every 24", some 2x4 purlins every 3-4 feet, and use corrugated sheet, or barn roofing. You can buy the sheets exact length needed from most jobber, so no cutting in the field, and it goes up super-quick. They even have preformed strips for the top end so water won't get in. You could also use barn siding on the new wall, to minimize the chances of rot. Use treated wood for the framing, at least where it touches horizontal concrete. May be more than you need, but it will also make the house easier to sell for you or your heirs. Nobody wants to start out with a nasty shed or garage. An urban chicken coop like I described above would be quite appealing to people like me.
-- aem sends...
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:Some things you only want to do once. I'd demo all the existing rotten :wood, and build back with a new wall and properly pitched roof above, at :least 3-12. Maybe add some recycled windows on the high side, above the :block, to keep the place nice and bright inside.(Habitat ReStore around :here usually has a selection of dirt-cheap salvage windows that would be :perfect for that.) For a mild climate like that, I wouldn't even bother :with wood decking- 2x6 or 2x8 rafters every 24", some 2x4 purlins every :3-4 feet, and use corrugated sheet, or barn roofing. You can buy the :sheets exact length needed from most jobber, so no cutting in the field, :and it goes up super-quick. They even have preformed strips for the top :end so water won't get in. You could also use barn siding on the new :wall, to minimize the chances of rot. Use treated wood for the framing, :at least where it touches horizontal concrete. May be more than you :need, but it will also make the house easier to sell for you or your :heirs. Nobody wants to start out with a nasty shed or garage. An urban :chicken coop like I described above would be quite appealing to people :like me. : :-- :aem sends...
Thanks for the great ideas! Treated wood, I wouldn't have thought of. I do have some wood preservative but I guess it would be better to get pressure treated wood.
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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wrote:

Only use PT for what contacts the ground or concrete - use standard SPF (or cedar if it is locally available at a good price) for the rest of the framing. I hate PT - the new stuff eats nails at an alarming rate - and would make short work of steel or aluminum siding too.
REALLY nasty stuff.
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On Thu, 08 Oct 2009 17:17:46 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
:Only use PT for what contacts the ground or concrete - use standard :SPF (or cedar if it is locally available at a good price) for the rest :of the framing. I hate PT - the new stuff eats nails at an alarming :rate - and would make short work of steel or aluminum siding too. : :REALLY nasty stuff.
SPF = Spruce Pine Fir?
PT eats nails, steel and aluminum? There's a compound in it that is THAT caustic ?!
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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