Replace Halogen Bulbs With LEDs?

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On 12/4/2013 7:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Sure they do, but we're talking about a home user replacing bulbs he can get a home depot at competitive prices. You tend to take a fringe view and beat people over the head with it.
Based on watching this group for a while, I'd have to say that a lot of what you say is technically correct, but irrelevant and even harmful in the context being discussed.
The clueless asking questions don't have the knowledge or experience to interpret what you say. If they did, they wouldn't have asked the question in the first place. In a practical home situation with lamps you bought from Ikea, the risk of burning your house down is greater with halogens. "Utter nonsense" gives the WRONG IMPRESSION.
Some of us think in the context of the original posting.
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Then my point stands. Halogen bulbs get no hotter than standard "tungsten" bulbs.

Utter nonsense.

I did. You simply can't read.
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Halogen sockets often are much hotter, prone to failure. Wire insulation hardens, breaks off, and the wire often breaks at crimps. Screw types are usually smaller footprint causing more heat at the socket. The little push in sockets also loose contact tension from heat. I've fixed Or replaced so many equipment types over the years.
I have kitchen pot lights. I use the smaller halogen screw lamps with the smaller footprint. They work great with dimmer, and I rarely use at full intensity. Probably only 40 watts each.
Greg
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wrote:

and you get even more light when your house burns down
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So, how many house fires have been caused by excess heat from halogen bulbs? I'd like to quantify the risk.

Which is much more than you can say for fluorescent light. It offends my eyes.
Cindy Hamilton
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On 12/05/2013 06:36 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Hi Cindy,
I don't have any specific information.
If you are going to use them, make sure they are installed in a heat resistant socket (porcelain?). Make sure they have room to breath to wick the heat away. Make sure the wiring is new so the insulation won't degrade from the heat. I personally wouldn't use them.

They sure do look pretty.

Try a Satco 5000K bulb. Should get rid of the flicker that hurts your eyes and match the color intensity of the halogen. Couldn't hurt to try one. A lot safer too. And, unlike the rest of those lying bulbs, the Satcos are actually long lived.
-T

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On 12/05/2013 12:06 PM, Todd wrote:

And make sure there is nothing flammable near them, such as a lamp shade! As I said, I would not personally own one.
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On Thursday, December 5, 2013 3:06:47 PM UTC-5, Todd wrote:

So, then you're just spewing opinion devoid of fact. You claim to be an electrical engineer? Then you should know that a watt is a watt. And whether it's a halogen or regular incandescent, 95% or so of the energy is converted to heat. Meaning that halogens are going to generate about the same amount of heat as a regular incandescent. Now depending on the form factor, a halogen bulb could have a hotter surface temp. But if for example you replace the same form factor and wattage light bulb with a halogen, I don't see where all the added and allegedly dangerous heat is coming from.

More FUD. Millions of people are using them. I have a variety of them here in my house. And if they were starting fires, you would think we's all have heard many reports of them starting fires, they would be banned, etc.
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On 12/05/2013 12:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Trader4,
Do you drive with your arm outstretch and your middle finger extended?
Here you go: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=fire+hazard+from+halogen+lamps
From the above search: http://www.fire-extinguisher101.com/halogen-light-safety.html
Halogen lights are popular as they are very effective, but their greatest disadvantage is that they emit an extraordinary amount of heat. A standard 75-watt light bulb operates at about 260 degrees Fahrenheit, while a 300-watt halogen light bulb can reach temperatures of up to 970 degrees Fahrenheit.
And another from the above search: http://www.ushio.com/support/lampsafety.htm
TUNGSTEN HALOGEN AND INCANDESCENT LAMPS
DANGER! Halogen lamps operate at extremely high temperatures that can cause serious physical injuries and property damage.
Only use Halogen lamps in Halogen-approved fixtures. Fixtures should fully contain any parts of the Halogen lamp upon the event of a lamp burst.
Do not use Halogen lamps in close proximity of paper, cloth or other combustible materials that can cause a fire hazard.
Lamps are very fragile. Do not drop, crush, bend or shake them. Vibration or impact will cause filament breakage and short lamp life.
Do not touch the Halogen bulb surface or inside reflectors with your bare hands. Oils from skin can lead to breakage or shorten the life of the lamp. Use clean gloves or lint-free cloth for installation and removal.
Clean any dirt, oil, or lint away from the lamp with alcohol and a lint-free cloth or tissue. Any foreign particles or materials on the bulb surface can cause hot spots on the bulb and result in lamp failure.
Never touch the lamp when it is on, or soon after it has been turned off, as it is hot and may cause serious burns. http://www.led-lamps.net.au/led-energy-saving/led-vs-cfl-vs-halogen Do not look directly at the operating lamp for any period of time; this may cause serious eye injury.
Always turn off the electrical power before inserting, removing, or cleaning the lamp.
Affix the lamp securely in the socket. Improper installations will cause electrical arcing, overheating and short life to lamp and socket. Replace lamp holders and sockets when necessary.
Keep the temperature of the Halogen lamp seal below 350° C. Keep the temperature of the Halogen bulb wall above 250° C. Keep the temperature of the Halogen lamp bulb wall below 800° C.
Make sure lamps of specified wattage and voltage are only used in appropriately rated fixtures. Unspecified use will lead to short lamp life, breakage and overheating of fixture.
Lamps should not be operated beyond the total rated voltage. Avoid the use of dimmers that may drive your lamp over its rated voltage.
Operate the lamp only in the indicated burn position. Failure to do so will lead to overheating and shortened lamp life.
Use an external fuse when required.
Do not allow one lamp to directly expose another. This may lead to overheating and shortened lamp life.
I will give you a hint. A watt is indeed a watt. How that watt gets out is a whole 'nother interesting story. A single glowing wire suspended in a vacuum shucks energy in a different manner than a super heated gas inside a double bulb. The glowing wire would tend to shuck it more by radiation and less by convection. A super heated gas, due to the containment it is confined to, would tend to shuck far more by convection. That is why you need the porcelain fixture and why I do not have them in my house. Paper light on fire at 260C and Halogen gases can rise to 2,500°C and the bulb up to 500°C. Source: http://www.led-lamps.net.au/led-energy-saving/led-vs-cfl-vs-halogen
And another hint: incandescent lamp wire glow "yellow" (about 2300 Kelvin), where super heated halogen gases glow "white" (about 5000 to 6500 Kelvin). The difference in the kelvin rating is why Halogen lamps look so pretty. And why they run a hell of a lot hotter.
Now put your middle finger away and act like a gentleman.
-T
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On Friday, December 6, 2013 12:54:45 AM UTC-5, Todd wrote:

wrote:

.au/led-energy-saving/led-vs-cfl-vs-halogenave heard

The only sources I see on that search are talking about torchere type halogen floor lamps. They are not talking about replacing 50W flood, or the typical incandescent with an equivalent wattage and design halogen bulb, which is what the thread is about. The form factors of those are very different than the small, narrow tube type bulb used in torchere lamps. If you let a drape dangel into a torchere, it can touch the small glass tube bulb. Replace a typical 100W incandescent bulb and there is no way that is possible. The halogen component is inside an outter glass shell.

And what credibility exactly does some randome website have? I didn't even see anything that says who's behind it. But if you read what they say, most of it is common sense, like let the bulb cool off before you remove it. They also don't seem to understand the difference between heat and temperature.

Looks like typical manufacturers warnings that you find on many products. Doesn't say they are burning houses down when you replace your 50W incandescent flood with a 50W halogen flood.

Wow, who would have thought that?

C.

C.

¿½ C.

Good that you now recogize the difference between heat and temperature.
A single

The halogen replacements we're talking about are sealed inside a glass envelope.

Show us a cite that says you need a porecelain fixture to replace a typical 100 W incandescent with a halogen equivalent.
Paper light on fire at 260C and Halogen

ce:

If you're gonna look at the temp of the gas, then what's the temp of a tungsten filament if you touch that, or let it touch your drapes? More fud.

Again confusing the temp of an internal component that you can't touch with the heat emitted from the bulb enclosure.

Sorry if you can't handle the truth. Where are all those fire reports from 50W halogens like the OP is talking about using because they were not put in porcelain sockets? If they are half as unsafe as you claim, why are they still being sold. So far, in all the above, the only thing that makes sense is the NY Times talking about fire hazard of torch style halogens. That does make sense because they use a very different halogen bulb from what you have in an incandescent replacement style. Further the bulb is in an upward facing dish, making it easy for a curtain, etc to get in it, if you're careless enough to let that happen. I've had several of those operating for 35 years here and no fires.
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On 12/06/2013 05:42 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Make sure you have a good fire extinguisher. A really good idea even if you don't use halogens.
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<snipped the mess the Google groupie made of the NG>

Good grief, yet another fappin' Cracker Jax engineer. You're completely clueless.
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On 12/06/2013 02:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

And you are an ass hole and are kill filed
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Of course. A crappy engineer gets pissed when he's told what a crappy engineer he is. The truth often hurts.
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wrote:

ah, just like the fundie who gets pissed off when you don't agree with him...wait, that's you
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On Fri, 06 Dec 2013 22:13:51 -0800, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds"

You *insist* on proving that I'm right about you lefties, Malforemed. All you lefties can do is lie and repeat lies.
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wrote:

now I'm insulted: if you can't spell your limbaughnista flame correctly, get a new one
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On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 17:22:29 -0800, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds"

Not only do you insist on convincing everyone that lefties are all pathological liars, but yore actually proud of being a pathological liar. Well, your messiah is the same.
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On 12/6/2013 5:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Damn would you take your meds. You go off occasionaly then you go back to normal... Obviously something is bothering you.. So take care of it, or just shut up. Not everyone has your point of view, and if they don't you just blast them.
--
Jeff

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On 12/6/2013 5:24 PM, Todd wrote:

Kr-what is pretty close to that point, here, too.
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