repairing plastic housing

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I was thinking of taking two pieces of wood plates about 2 inches bigger than the housing and putting them on both sides (pancaking). I would run 6 long bolts between the housing. THis would apply pressure to keep the crack closed.
http://www.poolcenter.com/parts_pumps_pacfab_challenger.htm
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On Sat, 14 Jul 2012 13:03:36 -0700 (PDT), Deodiaus

Are you attempting this repair because you can't just go buy the part? If not, my advise is to just go buy the part. My pool runs nowhere near 70 psi and when it starts the pump housing visibly balloons out and back in from the pressure wave during start up. I can't imagine a crack repair of it would last any time at all.
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It split at the corner, not the seam.
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On Saturday, July 14, 2012 10:05:39 PM UTC-5, Deodiaus wrote:

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It split at the corner, not the seam. see red line in https://post.craigslist.org/manage/3139489682 post.
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Deodiaus wrote:

Your first post said,
"It split under pressure at the seam. http://memphis.craigslist.org/wan/3139489682.html ".
I think the parts list that you posted showed that the part(s) you need would cost about $800 plus shipping. I would say that if you know exactly what part you need and can take it apart, then buy the part and replace it.
Or, if you feel like it, take it apart and try to fix the part using whatever trick you think may work (maybe with some kind of bracing or whatever) and see if that will work first. I think it probably won't work, but you have little to lose by trying. Then, most likely, you'll need to buy the part to fix it.
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On Saturday, July 14, 2012 1:03:36 PM UTC-7, Deodiaus wrote:

If the plastic is PVC or ABS, favor solvent weld, such as PVC pipe cement, but it's possible the plastic has become brittle from exposure to chlorine in the water.
If the plastic doesn't disolve at all when exposed to lacquer thinner or carburetor/throttle body spray, it's probably acetal or polypropylene and can't be fixed well except by melting it with a soldering iron or woodburning iron. The latter is better because it uses a nonstick anodized or teflon-coated tip.
Forget epoxy, unless you rough up the plastic and reinforce the epoxy with fiberglass, as recommended by others. Even covering the whole piece with fiberglass isn't unreasonable.
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