Reducing refrigerator noise?


My bedroom happens to be on the other side of the kitchen, where the refrigerator is located. The refrigerator is enclosed by cabinets, with some extra space on the top.. The refrigerator is new, but at night the noise can still be heard in the bedroom.
I am thinking about putting some kind of foam material to the wall in the kitchen where the refrigerator is located. There's enough clearance for a few inches of padding for sure.
Does anyone know where I can buy such things? I know I can get some kind of adhesive sound reducing foam padding for computer cases, but they are generally pretty expensive..
Thanks!
Raymond
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Yes. It's called insulation, and it's available at most home centers. Or look in the yellow pages if you want someone to come in and blow the stuff into your wall for you. Even the normal stuff insulates from sound as well as heat - doesn't have to be specific sound-reducing material unless you're a recording studio, or unless you still can't insulate enough with regular insulation. Andy
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spray closed cell foam is the most effective, but costly. of course you dont need much but its a small job.
it deadens sound 2 ways, makes it harder to transmit, and prevents air passage which ultimately allows sound to pass.
try running a fan or other white noise generator at night to mask the noise.
new fridges are much more energy efficent but the tradeoff is noise:(
Since its new you might try living with it for a few days you will eventually adjust.....
just like to the sound of AC or furnace running or occasional street noise, your brain says thats normal let him sleep:)
yur fridge is new so your brain says wake him might be hazardous:(
over time everything will settle out
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Glad brain doesn't do this when I'm sleeping and gotta wiz.
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snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Maybe the sound is being transmitted to the floor and not emanating from the refrigerator case. If so, some simple rubber pads under the four leveling feet should dramatically cut down the racket. Additionally, you might check the compressor to see if it has shifted on its mounts and might be involved in the noise making problem. HTH
Joe
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On Thu, 5 Oct 2006 00:29:32 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

recycled cellulose panels, (Homasote, or something similar.) Well, what you really want is lead-filled vinyl, but if you're balking at the price of foam, you won't pay for that.
And whatever you're doing in the evenings that's keeping you from sleeping, cut it out, or do it in the morning. If I can sleep next to an oil-fired forced air furnace, you should be able that manage being on the other side of a wall from a refridgerator.
Less coffee, more exercise.
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Hehe. Thanks everyone for the advice. I was thinking about something I can do without putting anything inside the drywalls... Some kind of self adhesive foam padding I can put up on the wall where the frig is at..
I am kinda used to it already, so no big deal... ;)
Raymond
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On Thu, 5 Oct 2006 22:08:49 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

As I understand it, foam surfaces are for reducing high-frequency reflective-type noise in the same room with the sound source, and to decouple masses. Massive (heavy) stuff is for reducing low-frequency transmission through walls.
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snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Before you go out and buy anything expensive or exotic, I would try experimenting with materials that you might have around the house or are inexpensive to buy. You might try hanging a couple layers of carpet on the wall, for instance, or some blankets. Sheet rock should work very well if you mount it with a dead air space.
If your experiments don't results in some perceptible reduction in the noise, there's a good chance that regular sound-proofing material won't either and the noise is propagating through a different medium, like the floor for instance or even under your bedroom door.
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How about putting a (3 pronged) timer on the fridge? Maybe set it to come back on after you are asleep? Having it cut off for a 3 hour period (or so) wouldn't harm anything. The door would be closed the whole time ne way.. CP
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