Question about Weed Killer

Hello everyone. I have been thinking of using some of that liquid weed killer for the weeds in my yard. I've never used the product before. Which brand do you recommend? Is it poured on directly or is it diluted with water? And can you tell me whether it spreads? I'm concerned about using it on some weeds that surround a pretty tree in my yard. Is the weed killer specific to the weeds or is it likely to kill the tree as well? Do you know how far it seeps into the soil and affects other plants? Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I suspect you will want to post this to rec.gardening, if they will answer it. Most gardeners aren't that big on chemical killers. I know, I have asked them in the same way you have worded it. Probably the best thing to do is to take samples of the weeds you want to kill along with a list of those things you don't want to kill to a garden shop and ask them for advice. One usually does far more harm to the soil and possibly themselves if they don't follow the advice carefully and the weeds survive. Also each area of the state, country have spedific chemicals you can buy and those that are banned. You don't say where you are.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hire a professional lawn care company. They have all the equipment and know how.
It may be more expensive than if you did it yourself, but they will probably do a much better job than you could, and it will be safer for you and your plants in the long run.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Brand isn't necessarily important. The two most common weed killers are 2,4-D and glyphosate (Roundup). 2,4-D is for weeds in lawns; it kills most broadleaf weeds (dandelions, etc.) but doesn't really harm the grass if used properly. Roundup is a general herbicide and kills most everything it is applied to.
I buy "Ace" branded versions of both.
In cases of specific, stubborn weeds, you may want to choose another type. But the first two should do fine for most lawn needs.

Almost all versions are diluted in some fashion, and come in handy spray bottles. You can buy liquid concentrate, to save money, but you must dilute it yourself before spraying.

A matter of debate. I haven't found that to be the case, but some people are very concerned, for example, about their neighbors' usage. All weed-killer products will join storm runoff and reach local waterways.

A mature tree should be able to handle a few 2,4-D sprays inside its dripline without problem. A small ornamental or youthful tree may need more caution. Killing the tree outright is unlikely, but you might weaken it for a season or two. If you're really concerned, you can always just pull the weeds close to the tree. Chemicals don't kill better, they just kill easier.

Again, a matter of debate. I wouldn't overdo it but I don't see why judicious use of weed killer according to instructions should badly affect you or your garden.
Ultimately the best weed control is a healthy lawn, cut to proper height and fertilized according to soil needs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Roundup is not supposed to migrate, others like Weed Be Gone do. If you are worried about harm do it the old fashioned way. Yes weed killers have allot of adverse affects, they kill dont they.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
m Ransley wrote:

about 6 weeks. But not much of it. Nitrates are soluable in water and thus can wash away.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in message

Contact your state extension service. Have the tree type ready to share. "a pretty tree" and "that liquid weed killer" won't help. TB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in message

If you haven't already made up your mind, I'd encourage you to consider alternatives. Even if your yard is solid weeds and the grass is almost completely choked out, there are alternatives. If you've got light to moderate weediness, your best bet would be to work on getting the soil and healthy enough to stand up against the weeds.
Chemicals have so many drawbacks:
1. They are toxic - that's the whole idea. Read the warnings on the containers and consider whether you want to breathe it while you're applying it, whether you want your kids or pets or the local wildlife anywhere near it, and whether you want it leaching into the environment.
2. The chemicals are also toxic to the various microorganisms living in the soil that keep your lawn healthy. If you kill them off, there's nothing to do but keep dumping chemicals on to feed your lawn. You'll have a chemically-dependent lawn.
3. Chemicals aren't as effective as you might think. There are always a few survivors, and those weeds create the next generation of weeds that are more tolerant of various herbicides, necessitating the creation of even more potent chemicals. It's a vicious cycle.
Digging is really the most effective weapon against weeds. I know it's labor intensive, but there are ways to make it easier. I used to pay my daughter a nickel per dandelion and a dime per thistle. If you don't have kids, hire neighbor kids. If you're willing to do it yourself, just take it a little bit at a time. When my daughter was unwilling or unavailable, I'd just dig the dandelions that were blooming on a given day, leaving the others for another day.
If you've got a large section of solid weeds, you can cover it with black plastic for a year (maybe less), then start over with grass.
Or, let it be. One doesn't need a golf-course lawn. A few intruders don't hurt anything and provide visual interest as well as food for various critters. There are many books and web sites about maintaining a healthy, chemical-free lawn. One of those books would cost the same as your first batch of chemicals.
Here's one such link - it's very brief and offers other links.
http://www.thegreenguide.com/doc.mhtml?i &&s=lawns

That said, the type of herbicide you choose depends on what you are trying to accomplish and what types of weeds you are trying to kill.
For wholesale slaughter, you can use a general herbicide such as Roundup. It kills anything whose leaves it touches. You can buy it in diluted and undiluted form. You would use the undiluted form in a sprayer and add water to it. I would advise against using the kind that attaches to your hose. If any gets on your hose it could kill whatever you use it on next. You can get pump sprayers that are used for this express purpose. Do not use it subsequently for applying fertilizers. Once you've used it for killing stuff, keep it for that purpose only.
You can also use Roundup somewhat selectively. If you spray it on one plant and don't get a drop on the plant immediately next to it, that neighbor plant will be fine. You do this by putting it in a squirt bottle (again, in diluted form) and squirt individual weeds with it.
For selective killing, you can get broadleaf herbicides such as Weed-B-Gone, which come in liquid and dry form. These will not kill grass ("narrow leaf"), but will kill pretty much anything else. The liquid form can be used for sport killing (as described above), and the dry form is spread in a spreader.
WARNING: DO NOT SPRAY ANY HERBICIDE ON ANYTHING BUT A CALM DAY!!! The slightest breeze can catch the stuff and get it on plants or trees that you don't want to kill. And if it kills your neighbor's plants or trees, you could have a lawsuit on your hands.

As stated above, these work by being applied to the leaves and working their way into the plant's "system". Nearby plants will not be affected by the poison leaching into the soil. Also as stated above, the beneficial organisms in your soil WILL be affected.
Hope this helps.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Do yourself a favor - identify your grass variety, indentify the weed, then get advice for the right method. You can buy broadleaf or grassy weed herbicides, in dry, liquid or concentrate. No way of knowing what you need until you know what you have. Kind of like saying, "I'm sick. What kind of medication do I need?"
Roundup is a total vegetation killer - non-selective. Some herbicides will migrate through roots and kill or damage any plant whose roots take them up. RU works on foliage. Some are pretty toxic to wildlife. Some are pre-emergent - have to treat before the weed (like crabgrass) is full-grown, and some need to be applied when the weed is actively growing. Some are banned in some states. Best not to use herb., generally, during times when plants are stressed (hot, dry weather). Type, amount, time of year and conditions all are important. Go to your county or state extension service - probably have a website - and check out lawncare. You can't find out all you should know on a newsgroup.
Proper watering, fertilizing and mowing have a lot to do with weed situation, as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27 Jul 2004 23:33:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Weed-B-Gone or Spectricide will kill broadleaf weeds without harming the lawn or trees. Follow directions on the container.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to all of you for your replies. I learned something today from all posts!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chemqueries wrote:

I had a bunch of weeds around some trees. Big spikey weeds that were kinda tiger striped.
I took heavy gloves and a metal spike, waited until after rain and pulled them out (with a little help from the spike to get the root up).
No damage to the bushes and trees I wanted.
We also had a bunch of weeds coming up between stones in a walk way.
Lower priority - so when I made noodled, I'd just skip out the noodles and dump the boiling hot water onto the walkway and weeds. They are thoroughly dead. But the lizards and hummingbirds in the bushes along the walk aren't dead.
(and strong mix of Round-Up sprayed onto the "sticks" that turned out to be poison oak once spring came (and once I stopped itching from a stroll through them)).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.