Push in wire connectors

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But a few posts later, someone said that it's *imperative* that you *do* twist the wires *before* inserting into the wire-nut.
PLEASE -- which is correct?
(And why?)
Thanks!
David
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wrote:

Do not twist the wires before you put the wire in the wire nut according to code and do not use the push in terminals on the plug and when you put the wire on the screw wrap it around the screw and pinch the wires tight together....
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On Wed, 13 Dec 2006 02:18:38 GMT, "Phillip Devoll"

the "code" only says follow the manufacturer's instructions and most manufacturers (Ideal, 3M )say "it is not necessary to twist" They do not say "don't twist". It is really up to the installer. You can get a good connection or a bad one either way. That is where skill and experience come in.
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On Sun, 12 Nov 2006 14:19:58 -0800, "Eigenvector"

I agree with the old-timer and tighten with the screw. I have had push in connections. I think they have failed most often in my case, where the wife use to plug a vacuum in regularly.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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I suspect they're okay for the terminal junction.
But look how they work. Like an alligator clamp.
If several outlets are daisy-chained, the final current draw on the first plug-in may be significant - and greater than the miniscule contact area can handle. This results in charring, overheating, and (if you're lucky) loss of connectivity.
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for sure. But it seems like losses in a circuit due to bad connections would be measurable and testable.
I know I have seen a lot of wire nut connections that seemed firm - until the wire is twisted as it's being pushed back into the box. That's one of the bigger advantages over wire nuts that I saw there - unlike a wire nut, the push in connector has all the wires in a line and easily routed out of the way back in the junction box.
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"Eigenvector" >>

Go to HD and buy a cheapo outlet with push-in connectors ($0.39). Whack it with a hammer.
Now you can see the miniature speed-nut that is the electrical connection.
Put 15 Amps through that teeny surface area and you've got molten brass.
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I'm working on a Hospital, the electricians are using them. I never seen them before, they have a onsite inspector not very lenient. Myself not being an electrician, I'll stick to wire nuts & screws
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Sacramento Dave wrote:

Yes, and 35 years ago the electricians used aluminum wire with the "stab in" outlets in my neighborhood. Many have had electrical problems, even fires. I was lucky. They started learning of the problems. In my house, the still used aluminum, but used the screws. I have pigtailed copper to these and have never had a problem. Houses built a half a year later than mine, used the special switches and outlets rated for aluminum. Houses built a year or 2 later, didn't use aluminum for branch circuits.
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On Sun, 12 Nov 2006 14:19:58 -0800, "Eigenvector"

Purely option, of mine and asking others. The dislike I noticed comes from bad results from 'backstabbing' receptacles and switches. So these connectors have to overcome past dislike.
I don't like them because a tan wire nut will handle so many ranges of wire combinations, and number of 14# wire (1-5).
Just my option, and my observations.
later,
tom @ www.NoCostAds.com
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On Sun, 12 Nov 2006 14:19:58 -0800, "Eigenvector"

You might have the opportunity to use these push in terminals real soon again. Once you burn down your house, you can do it all over again.......... and again ............ and again...................
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I just used them in a junction box for my bathroom remodeling project...seemed very secure and i liked the fact that they wires were easy to tuck back into the box.
I did dissect one of them and it seems it is beefier and more secure than a stab-lock fixture might be...there is a hump that the wire has to ride over which increases the contact with the "fingers"
I bought a halo new construction lighting can to go over my shower (with a shower trim, of course) and when I opened the J-Box on the can lo and behold...push in wire terminals.
I do like the fact these have a port on them for checking continuity.
I dont forsee an immediate problem with these connectors...
funny story when i was learning house wiring in electronics I had a teacher who would yank the wirenuts on our connections VERY hard..and if ONE nut gave..he cut all the wires and said "DO OVER".
Now in my home wiring I am just about as anal about tight conenctions...I tighten those damn nuts up so tight that a few times the plastic has seperated from the cone...these are Buchannan wire nuts I am talking about here...
Well I did the same "Yank Test" on these push on connectors and those damn things didnt budge...irregardless if it was 12 or 14 guage wire.
I feel pretty confident using them..
Josh

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