Push button for garage door opener

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I have a push button mounted on the stud next to the garage door. The electrical wires are correctly connected to the push button and to the garage-door opener because, when I push the button, the garage door opens and closes.
The push button has suffered a dent so it needs to be replaced.
I have bought a new push button and attached the wires correctly.
Now, when I push the button, the garage door goes up. But, when I push the button again. the door doesn't go down unless I disconnect and reconnect the wires.
Apparently, I bought the wrong type of push button. What kind of push button do I need to buy?
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I don't know what the new doors may be using, but my older opener just used a simple doorbell button. About $1.
My older door opener did not have any safety interlocks like the new ones do. Does it go down OK with the remote?
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Yes, the remote opens the door with one push and closes the door with another push. Now, if the push button would do the same thing....
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I used to have an older opener here, with a simple doorbell button.
The opener was replaced with one with a fancy control (lighted button, seperate button for light only, switch to disable opener when closed). The old button is still connected (in parallel) and still works.
--
Mark Lloyd
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On Sat, 19 Mar 2011 21:36:06 -0700 (PDT), gcotterl

You probably mounted the button upside down. Reverse it and you'll be able to shut the door but not open it. You don't want it to open with a button or someone will steal everything in your garage.
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On 3/19/2011 11:36 PM, gcotterl wrote:

sounds like you bought a lighted doorbell button. Take the bulb out or get one that is not lighted.
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Steve Barker
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No, Steve, I did not buy a lighted doorbell button.
My garage has two doors: a 16-foot wide sectional door (operated by the garage-door opener) and a 32-inch wide back-door.
I'd like to put a push button beside each door so do I buy two "momentary" push buttons?
Do "momentary" push-buttons have a different name? (The Lowes/Home Depot people don't know what I'm talking about). I
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In my layman's view, this is how the garagedoor openers (pushbutton or remote) work: There are 3 possible actions - open, stop, close. They get used in that order and then start anew. In addition there are stops at the top and bottom that only issue the stop order. A momentary signal from the remote or from the doorbell-type button issue the action commands. If you get a button switch that switches between on and off, you are energizing the circuit(s) far too long if you only push the button once. You have to push that button twice to have the same action as the door bell with a single push and let go.
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Han
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Go down and ask for a doorbell button - that is what you need. AFAIK all of them are momentary.
As for two buttons, no problem as long as you wire them both from the opener itself. It would get complicated if you tried to wire them in on the same run of wire.
Harry K
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On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 07:37:41 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

Actually, VERY simple on the same run of wire - just skin the wire and put it under the screws for the first one, and carry on to the last one. Switches need to be IN PARALLEL to each other.
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Ooops. They could be wired with one run of wire if it were a 3 conductor wire.
Harry K
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On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 07:39:34 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

Not necessary, Harry. 2 wires is all that is required.
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On Mar 20, 9:52am, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yep, as soon as you pointed it out it was obvious.
Harry K
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On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 06:29:25 -0700 (PDT), gcotterl

Doorbell buttond are "momentary"
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On 03/20/2011 08:29 AM, gcotterl wrote:

A momentary normally open switch is one that is open (off) when it is not pressed and closed (on) when it is pressed.
Example 1: a door-buzzer switch: the buzzer is buzzing only when you are pressing the button.
Example 2: The circuit that controls the motor of a door opener is sensitive to the momentary switch's transitions from off to on.
Probably you should just buy two switches at a place that sells and fixes garage doors.
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For what it's worth, my liftmaster has an "intelligent" button. It connects with just 2 wires that power it and it sends signals back down the two wires on top of the power to the controller to raise and lower the door, to lock the door, and to activate the light. So no ordinary push button is going to work on mine. Just saying there are others out there.
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jamesgangnc wrote:

Hmmm, Joking, right? If not you are an idiot!
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wrote:

No, there actually ARE 2 wire coded controllers available that can do more than one thing. The newer ones are digital multiplex, the older ones wer analog - different resistance for different functions - just like the cruise control switch on a lot of '70s era cars.
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Ya, riiightt. You can test that theory by disconnect the wires at the switch and touching them together. Prepare to be embarrassed.
Harry K
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Nope. Not joking. Has a circuit board in it with parts on it. I suspect the reason was so that it could do several things with just 2 wires. That way people that have just 2 conductors buried in the wall can have more features. Wire is polarized (red and white) and the connections on the button are polarized as well.
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