Propane generator for blackouts?

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I've used a three wire cord, cut off an appliance. (Preferably appliance that someone else put to the curb.) I disconnected the furnace, and wire nut it to the appliance cord.
Do this only if one has basic electrical knowledge. I had a job for six years, as a furnace and HVAC installer. So, I got some training.
After the power cut, put the wiring back as it was. Safety rules apply, disclaimers also apply. Do not use while taking a shower, or while watering the garden. Remmber: After the power comes back on, you're working with live wires.
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Christopher A. Young
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dgk wrote:

1. You'd be surprised at the people who drive around listening for generators - their need is more urgent than yours. 2. The only purpose a "quite" generator serves is to make it easier for you to hear your neighbor's generators.

If you've got the extra money, go for it.

Why not? Natural gas STARTS from the outside (generally). It's just as easy to tap into a NG line as it is a water line; easier, in fact, because you can do so by simply drilling a hole in the NG pipe.

Propane CAN'T be easier since it involves a trip somewhere to get the tanks filled. NG comes right to your house.
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1. You'd be surprised at the people who drive around listening for generators - their need is more urgent than yours.
CY: And he may well be surprised how miserable his neighbors can be, in times of crisis.
2. The only purpose a "quite" generator serves is to make it easier for you to hear your neighbor's generators.
CY: And also to be less likely to be stolen.

If you've got the extra money, go for it.
CY: Always decisions to make.

Why not? Natural gas STARTS from the outside (generally). It's just as easy to tap into a NG line as it is a water line; easier, in fact, because you can do so by simply drilling a hole in the NG pipe.
CY: Many places have external meters, and that may be a good place to tap off a NG line. The Home Depot near me has stationary NG generators. Those look convenient, if money will permit. As for me, no money to be had. So, a small gasoline generator will have to serve.

Propane CAN'T be easier since it involves a trip somewhere to get the tanks filled. NG comes right to your house.
CY: In most parts of the world, the NG is totally dependable. Propane can be used for cabins, and remote properties with no NG available.
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On Mon, 4 Oct 2010 17:48:39 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

I will look into running natural gas, but the main comes in the front of the house so it would involve taping it near the rear, where the furnace and hot water heater are. But the only way to run it out of the house right now would be the dryer vent, and running a gas line next to hot exhaust seems like a bad idea.
I liked the idea of propane because I already have propane tanks but maybe a larger tank would be ok?
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dgk wrote:

1. You could tap into the line at the front of the house and bury a 3/8" plastic hose six inches deep to the rear.
2. Uh, why can't you put another hole in your house in the vicinity of the dryer exhaust? If you're worried about it, use 3/8" copper pipe inside the dryer vent. The air from the dryer vent is plenty warm, but I wouldn't call it "hot."
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On 10/5/2010 1:41 PM, HeyBub wrote:

Then what would he use for the gas line since that size is too small for NG?

Is this in the harbor freight do it yourself manual?
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George wrote:

Hmm. You may be right.
I note the gas line to the burners on my stove are, maybe, 1/4" and I know the gas line to a gas yard light is 3/8.
I know ! I have "skinny" gas.
Alternatively, I meant to say 3/4".
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Most houses have some place where a contractor could drill through the sill plate. Not a big deal. If you had a contractor install a stationary NG generator, that's a routine way to handle it.
Near me, the propane companies have 100 pound "cooking gas" tanks, and 100 or 250 gal "heating gas" tanks. The price of the gas is different, too.
Sounds like you've decided to get the portable LPG generator. Please let us know how it works. Maybe some others on the list will purchase the same generator, if it works well.
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HeyBub wrote the following:

Some people don't have NG piped to their house. In those areas they may have LP fired water heaters, ranges, ovens, clothes driers, and fireplaces (as I do). There would be a 100-200 gallon or larger LP tank outside the house. In those cases, it would have to be a very long outage to run out of LP, and even so, the LP is delivered.
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wrote:

But I do have NG so it becomes a question. Still, I don't like the idea of running a gas pipeline outside of the house. I don't think it's a job for me which makes it expensive.
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dgk wrote the following:

The one thing different is that a gasoline generator can be refueled while it is still running. Yes, I know it may not be recommended, but it can be done with care. Besides, that 3500 watt may not be adequate for a complete household electrical system. I have a 5500 watt gas generator and I have to turn the breaker off on the CAC before running the generator, or the house browns out when it kicks on and doesn't recover. As it is, my 230 volt 3/4 hp well pump causes a momentary brown out when it kicks in under auxiliary power.

(Amazon.com product link shortened)85981320&sr=1-3
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Bill
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Ought to be possible to make a valve and manifold rig, so you can change propane bottles.
I can easily imagine a central AC overloading a portable generator.
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