Poulan pro 44cc 20" chain saw - chain oil not feeding

I have a Poulan Pro 2900 46cc 20" chain saw. All of a sudden, the bar oil is not oiling the bar and chain. I took the cover off the bar and chain adjustment compartment, took the bar and chain off, cleaned the whole compartment out, and looked all over for a clogged feed line or something, and couldn't find where the bar oil was supposed to come out to lubricate the chain. I think the oil may come out onto the drive gear under the centrifugal clutch. The saw is full of regular bar oil. Unfortunately, I can't find the manual either. Any ideas, or a web location where I can find out what's wrong?
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

Check the oil holes on the bar itself. That's what I have to clean most often on my (non-poulan) saw.

I'd be surprised if the manual isn't available at www.poulan.com
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on 5/6/2008 3:19 PM Mike Paulsen said the following:

Thanks, but there are no holes on the bar, other than the holes the bar adjusting rod goes into.

manual says 'Clean the oil holes after each 5 hours of operation', but doesn't say where the oil holes are, or how to clean them if you could find them. The manual doesn't have an illustrated parts list either. The manual on line is the same as the one I have.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On an old Norelco saw I had from years ago, the chain lube went from the saw body into the bar near the drive sprocket, then existed through holes in the chain track on the bar. Don't know if Poulan uses a similar setup though.
Used a piece of stiff wire to clean the holes. Used to test the oiler by gunning the saw near some clean wood or newspaper. If I saw oil spray, I knew it was working.
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on 5/6/2008 9:18 PM Robert Neville said the following:

Thanks. Like I told another, there are only two holes in the bar and they are both for the adjusting screw to extend the bar to tighten the chain. There is a small hole on either side of the tightening bolts slot for the single adjusting rod, and thats because the bar can be mounted either side up. There is a worm pump under the sprocket/clutch and that's probably what failed. Apparently the worm gear pushes the oil up through the sprocket assembly which then transfers the oil to the sprocket, chain and bar when the clutch is engaged.. What is unusual about the chain oil operation on this machine was that when storing the saw over the past years, I had to put a large disposable aluminum baking pan underneath because the oil dripped out and made a mess on the shelf.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

Oil pump failed in my Poulan Wild Thing and was repaired under warranty. Plastic gears stripped or something like that. I think it is a common failure. Wild Thing is not a professional model but others may not be all that different. Authorized dealer was out in the boonies and I should have just tried to take back to HD where I bought it.
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on 5/6/2008 3:48 PM Frank said the following:

Thanks. I have had this saw for 8 years so there is no warranty. I think it might be the oil pump that failed. Unfortunately, I messed up the chain, bar, and sprocket when the oil stopped flowing. I was too busy looking at the saw in the cut and didn't notice right away that the tip started smoking and the chain guide teeth turned red going around the tip of the bar, when the saw just seized up. It chewed up the teeth on the drive sprocket, and the guide wheel on the bar tip. The chain tooth guides probably got so hot they lost their temper (as did I!). I'm looking at about $100 in replacement parts; pump, chain, bar, and sprocket kit. The saw costs around $200 new.
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In Hamptonburgh, NY
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The first thing went out on my Poulan Pro was the oil pump, so I went with a Husqvarna but it lasted only 5 hours before the engine died and Husqvarna won't fix it under warrantee. Funny Husqvarna suppose to be the industrial version of the Poulan Pro. Anyway I'm looking at a Milwaukee electric chainsaw and have the old Poulan Pro as a backup when electricity is not available. I usually test the oil pump, it draws a line of oil when the engine is speed up. before I do any cutting. BTW, 18" electric Poulan Pro under $100 at Amazon.com.
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On Tuesday, May 6, 2008 1:50:58 PM UTC-5, willshak wrote:

Hello:
I know this is an old post, but maybe you're still there or others will ben efit:
I have the Poulan Pro PP4620av model, but many others are similar.
On the Poulans of this same type, the bar adjusting hole on the bottom enga ges with the bar adjuster pin, but the top hole is open & used for the Bar & Chain oil to flow into the bar under pressure.
When you flip the bar to even out the wear, the top hold will be the oil ho le.
To test if your saw oil pump is working, remove bar & chain, leave side cov er off & run saw, let idle & rev up. Leave on for a couple of minutes - yo u should observe bar oil flowing from the upper groove / slot in the upper portion of the 'bar plate' - [(the metal plate held in place by the two bar bolts (studs, actually)] if the bar were installed, this would flow into t he bar to lube things up.
The oil should be flowing readily down this plate & pooling as saw engine i dles & flow increasing with engine speed.
If your saw flows the bar oil, then your bar groove likely has a build up o f saw dust & chips that are blocking oil flow.
Take a thin piece of metal, thin screwdriver or even the end of a medium zi p tie, and run down the bar groove from tip to the rear end - you will be a mazed at how much organic wood material & oil gunk comes out !
This should restore the oil flow to the bar & chain.
I make a practice of 'aiming' the saw bar at a piece of wood, etc, and revv ing up strongly to check & see if oil is flung off the tip & makes a stripe of residue, confirming bar is being oiled. I'll do this every 2-3 long cu ts.
The only other helpful hint I have is if it's cold winter weather, thin out that Bar Oil with some ATF.
I find 22 oz of Bar Oil (Huskvarna brand) to 10 oz of ATF (Quart total) to be a great mixture, when the temps are averaging 50 degrees & lower. The t hick oil just doesn't flow well at those temps & the bar & chain starve for oil.
It's also got to be easier on the oil pump to not try to pump the thick syr up like Bar Oil at low temps.
I've learned all this by servicing my Poulan Saw. It's going great after 3 seasons & probably 40 hours of runtime.
Best Regards, David in East Texas
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