Plumbing Question

Have a large - deep sink in the laundry room to which the washer drains. The sink has an overflow on the back side that has a 1" outlet under the sink. (Was not connected to anything) As some might forget to remove wash cloths, sponges, etc the sink would overflow during the wash/rinse cycles. The good husband I am, I added a hose to a newly installed dishwasher branch tailpiece which is located below the sink drain and above the p-trap. Problem is the it doesn't drain the water when it reaches to overflow. I now suspect it's water locked and needs some vent of sorts. But can't really see how that could be done. Any advise? Thanks Bg
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When you're testing the overflow, do you have the main sink stoppered?
sounds like your main drain is inadequate. The washer should have it's own dedicated drain. I'd recommend giving the drain a good snaking about 30 feet. you're dumping a lot of lint into the drain. It may be shared with kitchen sink and garbage disposal. if so snake that section also.

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The sinks drain fine. When I have the stopper in and it reaches that level it does not drain through the overflow (newly added by-pass). If I disconnect the hose from the tailpiece it will drain from the overflow. I suspect I need to install a vent. I would likely cut the hose and add a T-fitting, with the "T" attached to a vent. Sound right?? Bg

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The sink drain and the overflow should be connected together before the P trap, and the vent should be after the P trap. The vent should either extend vertically out of the house, or connect to something that does.
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Thanks to all that replied. bg
wrote:

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Well, there's a lot of new, modern tools for making the same hole :-)
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wrote:

Oh, sorry, was thinking supply. (never seen copper drains in a residential so I don't naturally think that way) Of course, in my part of the world we don't use PVC for drain lines either.
sdb
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On Feb 18, 1:10 pm, sylvan butler

Ok, now you have my attention. ABS? or something really unusual?
JK
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wrote:

Cheap ABS. Foam core, typically. About the only PVC you see is the sewer mains put in by the city. ABS thruout the building, and out to the street. I was trying to find some PVC waste fittings and all the jobbers looked at me like I was crazy. Had to order them. :(
sdb
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I posted a question a few days ago about 1/2 inch copper tubing that is part of the baseboard heaters in my 1951 built house...well I more or less have worked out a solution. I spend good part of the day on Monday running around to several plumbing/heating/air conditioner suppliers....Several suggested that the reason the 1/2 copper tubing is bigger, is that at some point it may have froze with water in it and expanded a little....most had now idea how I could find fittings for these things. After checking about 5 places, I found someone who tried a few things and we hit on something that works. It seems that 1/2 X 3/8 copper couplers the small end will fit inside the tubing. it is a tight fit but it works...I had to use one on each end and a short piece of 1/2 inch tubing in the middle to connect. I just finished putting it all together and soldering and will see if it works tomorrow...thanks for the help and advise...........
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Glad you found a solution. You may get a little restriction, but it may not matter. At least it gets you going and can replace as needed. Depending on the temperature you operate at, consider PEX if it has to be re-done larger.
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On Oct 21, 12:08am, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

You may be able to use a short length of 3/4 pipe as a coupling.
Jimmie
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