PEX and water pressure ratings


I can't find a good reference for this. Does anyone know what PEX tubing is rated for so far as water pressure is concerned?
At my house I have a pretty varied range of water pressures, talking to my neighbor who happens to work for the water district, he indicates that we get about from 30 to 75 psi from our lines depending upon the time of day. Considering the dramatic increase in water pressure after replacing my hot water lines, I can only imagine what it would be like once the cold water lines are replaced (it's all galvanized).
I know pressure reducers and pressure regulators can be installed, but it seems like 80 psi is the breaking point for that type of installation - although I've heard that high water pressure can wear out fixtures faster, and my neighbors have had that experience.
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On Sat, 14 Apr 2007 11:19:15 -0700, "Eigenvector"

HTH.
http://www.vanguardpipe.com/pdfs/VanexTechdata.pdf
-- Oren
"The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!"
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Aquapex meets ASTM F876 and F877, and is certified to NSF standards 14 and 61. It is rated by the PPI : 200F at 80 psi, 180F at 100 psi, and 73.4F at 160 psi.
http://www.pexsupply.com/categories.asp?cID=25&brandid =
cheers Bob
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wrote:

Aquapex meets ASTM F876 and F877, and is certified to NSF standards 14 and 61. It is rated by the PPI : 200F at 80 psi, 180F at 100 psi, and 73.4F at 160 psi.
http://www.pexsupply.com/categories.asp?cID%&brandid
cheers Bob
Oooohh, that's cutting it pretty damn close.
Sounds like in a PEX environment keeping water pressure at 60psi or lower would give a much better factor of safety.
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wrote:

If so, try another gauge! -- Oren
"The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!"
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Hey, is there something wrong with wanting a nice forceful stream of water to wash away the grime and dirt?
Personally I only fully wake up when subjected to 140 degree water at 120 to 130 psi. But I guess some people are more tolerant...
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the higher rhe pressure the higher the bill$ & more leaks=more mold and mildew and more waste and more higher bill$. but if you don't care about the environment or your $ you are another rude american and obviously a moron
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I'm an American, rude or not........ !! -- Oren
"The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!"
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0On Sat, 14 Apr 2007 17:49:58 -0700, "Eigenvector"

Not at all.
An inspector for the sale of a home; said, in his report the pressure was to high - post 85 something. The buyer wanted me to fix this issue.
I used another pressure gauge and challenged him.!
We meet in the middle; nothing forceful about it.

Good for you.
-- Oren
"The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!"
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Goddamn, did you guys all check your sense of humor at the door this morning before signing on?
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Probably :)
But EV.......the ASTM testing & rating probably have some sort of safety factor in them so if you reduce from there you're adding safety factor on top of safety factor.
The allowable shear stress in wood is ~100psi........so does having a wooden member stressed to 85psi mean "cutting it kind close"?
IMO..... not really, since shear failure in an average timber occurs at 400 psi or greater,
I just re-PEX'd & have a pressure reducer set for 65/70 plus I have a system relief valve & water hammer arrestors so my peak pressure should be pretty much under control.................
we'll see how it all works out :)
cheers Bob
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Yeah I know there is a tendency to overdo the factor of safety portion. I actually do keep my water heater at the upper end, but assuming the temp vs. pressure numbers are accurate I still have quite a bit of leeway.
Given the pretty dramatic swings in water pressure, I consider 30psi to be pretty large, having a regulator/reducer may not be a bad idea - but that's not a major pressing matter.
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EV-
I missed this in one of your earlier posts
........ Considering the dramatic increase in water pressure after replacing my hot water lines, I can only imagine what it would be like once the cold water lines are replaced (it's all galvanized). .............
I believe you are are mistaking the increased flow as "a dramatic increase in water pressure"
the static pressure in your system is at the level suplied by the water company (30? to 75psi)......when you use water the pressure can only drop, when you shut the water off you can get short duration pressure spikes (water hammer).
Pex by it's nature reduces water hammer (Pex is much less stiff tthan steel pipe or copper tubeing), so the Pex itself acts like a water hammer arrestor...an accumulator..
Additonally, water hammer arrestors (required on all quick closing valves; dishwasher, washing machine, ice maker) will reduce these spikes.
cheers
Before I believed your neighbor....I'd take some pressure readings.
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Eigenvector wrote:

No, thats why they make pressure washers.

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On Sat, 14 Apr 2007 11:19:15 -0700, "Eigenvector"

When your half inch PEX pipes swell to 6 inches or more in diameter, it's time to install a pressure regulator. Better yet, use REAL pipe made from metal and you wont have to worry about it. Plastics are made for childrens toys, and disposible packaging, not for plumbing.
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