OT Wells Fargo sucks again.

I had message on my answering machine.............This is Wells Fargo calling about some suspicious activity on your card. Please call us at 800-446-0664.
I went online and checked my card and there was nothing charged for 3 days. I called the number just to see.......The message says to enter the last 4 of my credit card number. OK NOT. I hung up and called WF fraud number.
The guy that answered asked for the suspicious number I gave it to him. He said something like well we don't have every number for the credit card offices............I forgot exactly the excuse he used, but basically said I need to transfer you to somebody that gives a fuck. He gave me another number and then offered to transfer me.....The new number wanted me to key in my account number.......I said "banker" a few times and a recording said.............we can't process your call. <CLICK>
I called the original "fraud" number and explained again to the new person that answered and gave her the suspicious number....She said that the number was a fraudulent number and asked if I had furnished any info. I told her no. I just thought she might be interested in knowing. She said that she was and asked if she could help me with anything else. I said no, but I hope you catch the guy. I got the feeling that it was about 50 50 if investigate the number any farther.
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In my area that's suspicious right off the bat.
The privacy laws in my area say that financial institutions are forbidden from disclosing ANY details AT ALL about why they're calling when they leave a message. All they can say is something like, "Hi, this is Joe So- and-so at Whatchamacallit Bank, branch XXXX in MyCity, MyState. Please call me at your earliest convenience at 555-5555." That's it.
One time I found a girl's ID by the side of the road. The amount of stuff scattered in one area led to me to believe that these were the contents of her purse, minus cash and credit cards, of course. This girl banked at the institution my wife works for, but in a different town. My wife called her at the phone number on record at the bank, but was unable to say /why/ she was calling in the messages she was forced to leave on the answering machine. My wife called several times over the next couple of weeks, hoping to be answered by a person instead of the answering machine, but that never happened. The girl never phoned back, probably thinking my wife was making some kind of sales calls. I think the bank eventually destroyed the pieces of ID.
--
Tegger

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wrote:

gee, rather than calling the police?
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wrote:

<snip>

The ID had spent several months under a snowbank, exposed only once the snow had melted. This was quite obvious given the condition of the cards.
A bank rep did contact the cops. Between the bank's records and the cops' records it was discovered that the girl had long ago replaced all the paperwork I found. I had an idea that this would be the case, but I guessed that the girl might appreciate closure on what was probably a traumatic event at the time. I guessed wrong, evidently.
The cops told the bank rep that if they couldn't get hold of the girl, just to cut up the cards and forget about it. Besides, they were too busy ticketing automobile drivers to worry about actual crime.
--
Tegger

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Tegger wrote the following:

Well, it's a good thing you didn't call the police right off the bat. The documents could have been evidence in a crime, like the person was abducted or was missing. Calling the police would have meant that the police would have come to your house to retrieve the evidence and ask a bunch of questions like exactly where you found it, why you kept it for weeks, and all that other bullshit.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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This number 800-446-0664 is Wells Fargo Visa card fraud protection. They l eft an automated voice mail message today 10/10/2014 stating my full name a nd needing to confirm transactions. My card was stolen last night, and use d today at a gas station. WF flagged the transaction. Their algorithms mu st be getting better. Of course, I never spend $100 at a gas station. Mus t have been a big tank to fill. (I'm posting this in all of the who-called phone number sites just to make sure everyone sees that it is legit)
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amex did similar. however the card was not stolen, just unusable. not sure why. the charge was/would have been $250, a bit high for a gas bill, but not entirely impossible. I reckon the actual charge would have been billed _ had _ the card gone through for actual amount.
cheers
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Hi, Speaking of credit card, once some time ago, My daughter was traveling in Europe in the summer, wife went home to Korea for a visit, I was home dog/cat sitting. Some how we used card almost simultaneously once. Bank called me, primary card holder wondering what's going on.....
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I always call ahead of time when leaving the country just to keep them happy. Heck, you have to call just to go to S. Florida or they stop it. Every trip to the Keys over the last 10 years has required a call to the CC firm because they stop it. The customer care folks tell me I don't need to call w/in the Continental US. I tell them my experience indicates otherwise and to please humor me.
--
?Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive,
but what they conceal is vital.?
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On 10/12/2014 9:53 AM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

My CC lets me go on line and give the dates and states. When I went to Italy last trip, after 2+ weeks of no problems, the very last charge at the airport motel required a call. I ended up using a different card as the guy at the desk was confused figuring it out.
I got a text one asking me about a charge. I was on my way home from work, not in Paris, so I texted a "no" back. In seconds, my phone rang and they trashed the card and had a new one on the way.
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wrote:

How do they know it's you calling? Do they ask the security questions, in which case one could call from S. Florida when he first has troubles?
Or do they go by caller-ID and expect you to use a land-line?

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