OT: Vinyl LPs to MP3 transfer

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Anyone have experience with converting vinyl LPs to MP3 file?
Looking for advice on quality equipment, software and/or procedures.
Thank you
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I recently converted a cassette tape to mp3. It worked beautifully with just a patch cord, using Audacity. (From headphone jacks to line input. If you don't have an out jack on the record player that's another story.) I'd tried it once before on a different computer without good luck, so I suspect the quality of the sound card might make a difference.
The cassette I converted was a lecture, though. I don't generally listen to music. So I'm not expert at discerning the quality of the transfer. It sounded clear to me, with no noise or hissing, but a music fan might say differently.
| Anyone have experience with converting vinyl LPs to MP3 file? | | Looking for advice on quality equipment, software and/or procedures. | | Thank you
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On 12/18/2014 5:16 PM, Mayayana wrote:

With LPs, it would require a preamp. USB turntable converters have preamp. Though I have an older turntable, I could buy just the preamp, software and be good to go. I'm just uncertain which way to go.
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Meanie wrote:

What you really mean is RIAA correction . RIAA standards <IIRC>were designed to overcome the inherent problems with recording on vinyl media . You must "decode" to get a decent digital copy of music from vinyl . I have yet to make the plunge , but need to - most of my favorite music is on vinyl , and digital remasters aren't available for some . The rest I probably already have ...
--
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Terry Coombs wrote:

And after reading the literature I just downloaded Audacity . All my vinyl and my turntable <and probably my R2R deck and the rest of my audio equipment> will be in the SUV for the trip back from Memfrica after Christmas . I have a LOT of music I've wanted to listen to ...
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On 12/18/2014 9:06 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

Not sure what you're indicating with RIAA correction. From what I've read, RIAA is basically a specification or standard from the RIAA. It isn't a device in place of a phono preamp, is it?
I also found a software based RIAA equalization http://www.channld.com/pure-vinyl.html Is that something you're referring?
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On 12/19/2014 7:23 AM, Meanie wrote:

As you said earlier, you need some sort of preamp. A phono preamp usually has RIAA equalization. If you connect the turntable to a receiver, with a phono input, the recording output should be nicely equalized. I have a cheap stereo mixer, which has a phono (with RIAA equalization) built in, which works well for recording to the PC.
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wrote:

Agreed on the RIAA correction, but you dont need to buy a preamp, if you have a decent quality older stereo with PHONO inputs. That PHONO input /IS/ already setup for the RIAA. Just plug the turntable into the stereo, then connect a cord to the PREAMP OUT or TAPE OUT line on the srereo and run it to your computer sound card. You may need some adaptors to go from a RCA cable to the computer (Radio Shack has them).
I have never recorded a vinyl LP, but I know quite a lot about audio equipment. I have used Total Recorder software with Windows to record other stuff, such as a micophone, and recording the sound off video tracks. T R is decent and cheap software and runs on almost any version of Windows from Win98 and up. (Maybe some never versions wont work on older Windows)??? (I'm using an older version, which is simple).
This thread did bring up a question for me. Does NEW stereo equipment come with a PHONO input? (I bet not). I have not boughten stereo equipment in at least 25 years. I like the old stuff, and on my main stereo system, I have been using an actual power amp made for use on a stage, such as a sound system for a Rock band, and have speakers to match. More power than I'll ever need in a house, but reserve power means no distortion.
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Bob F wrote:

Did you use an input designated "phono" ? If so , RIAA correction is built in to the device you used .
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Meanie wrote:

Yes . Due to the dynamic range of the groove in the vinyl , some signals must be decreased . The RIAA equalization brings those signals back up .
--
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On 12/19/2014 8:19 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

Thanks for the clarification.
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Or you can feed the turntable into a receiver's phono jacks and connect the tape loop output from the receiver to the sound card line-input jack; use the receiver's pre-amp.
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Meanie,
That's a direct drive turntable from the mid 80s. It has a reputation for being fairly stable so the tracking force and anti-skating should be ok. I'd be suspicious of the needle. If you can't check it with a microscope then buy a new one. Maybe $20. Set the table up so it's level and play an old record to see if there are any problems. You can find the owner's manual on-line. You don't mention an amp or pre-amp. You need to get the turntable's weak signal amplified up to a "line-level" and also add a lot of bass. Radio Shack, among others, sell phono pre-amps that do this. Be aware that records before the early 60s may have a different bass equalization. Can't help you with this. So. a new needle $20
a pre-amp $15
a cable from turntable to pre-amp $10
a cable from pre-amp to computer $10
Audacity Free That may get your records into the computer.
Dave M.
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On 12/19/2014 11:53 AM, David Martel wrote:

What am I checking for under a microscope? I see the needle, though a bit dusty, it appears ok, but that's not saying much.

Yea, I'm uncertain of the age of her albums but I do know some or many of the artists are, um, dead.
I have this old Recoton stereo pre-amp but have no idea where it came from. I'm uncertain of it's quality but would most likely get a better one if needed.
I also have most cables required for hookups.

Thank you.
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This is the preamp I have.
http://www.crutchfield.com/S-UnnnbsGveI6/p_137SP2/Recoton-SP-2-phono-preamp.html
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Beats me.
In my case, I used the needle as is. I was very careful with needles and didn't expect any wear. When I took the turn table out of the attic, the drive belt had shriveled up.
Direct drive my be better, but I suggest lifting the turntable and at least looking at the drive mechanism. Any rubber may be gone.
--
Dan Espen

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Dan Espen wrote:

No rubber in most direct drive TT's . They use a synchronous motor and the turntable is mounted to the motor shaft .
--
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No, it's switched and servo operated. Synchronous motors start very slow. Direct drives get up to speed within one revolution usually.
Greg
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Terry,
There may be rubber shockmounts and other rubber parts. Honestly though those parts seem to last forever whereas the belts do fail. Still, checking these things is wise
Dave M.
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On 12/19/2014 8:35 PM, David Martel wrote:

Yep. Mine have the rubber shock mounted feet and still look good. I had this thing sitting in the attic for so long. After cleaning the dust, it still looks near new.
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