Old PC router

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If you have a variac, mebbe run it slowly to begin with, as whatever lube is in the bearings may not be uniform, at this point.
Or, mebbe wire it in series with a toaster or other power tool, to get some voltage drop. Easy to do if you have some spare receptacles on a shelf someplace. 49c at HD.
PC is generally good stuff, worth fixing if necessary.
--
EA



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I've got a very well running PC (was called Rockwell at the time it was purchased) 3" x 21' belt sander (Cat. # 337). It was one of the first power tools I acquired. It has a polished aluminum housing rather than the current powder coated one. I took it into PC in Houston several years ago to have the rubber drive roller replaced. They offered to buy it for their museum. I chose to have it fixed and it still running. Those old tools may not have al the bells and whistles of the new ones but if you treat them kindly they out last us.
Joe G
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Ive got about 14 different 1980s Rockwell and PC tools, Its nice seeing a Made in USA stamp on them.
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On 3/27/2010 6:10 AM ransley spake thus:

Why do you think the bearings would dry out? They're sealed ball bearings, no doubt. It's not as if the grease is going to be suddenly thrown out by centrifugal force or anything.
Just to give an example of the longevity of such bearings, let me introduce my vacuum cleaner. I have a Kenmore upright that I bought for $10 circa 1980. The cleaner is probably 30 years older than that. It still works perfectly well, having the same kind of universal motor and sealed ball bearings found in your router.
So I wouldn't sweat it. As someone else suggested, spin the shaft by hand to feel what the bearings are like. If it spins smoothly, just use it.
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Well, routers also spin at 20,000+ rpm.
Mebbe another idea to re-distribute the grease in un-used bearing is to somehow put the arbor of the router in the chuck of a 1/2 drill, and spin it like that for a few minutes.
Could be kind of paranoic, but it also couldn't hurt.
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On 3/27/2010 9:03 AM Existential Angst spake thus:

>

So does my vacuum cleaner. Same type motor.

Totally unnecessary. Both you and the OP are overthinking this.
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

Because it's been sitting unused for 20-some years, perhaps??? :)
It can be a big difference between age w/ exercise and "just sitting"--the lubricant will harden w/ age. It _probably_ will be ok if given a little time to break in again but then again, maybe not... :( I've had both experiences with old tools picked up at garage/estate sales, etc.; some do and some don't. One doesn't know the condition at last time of use either, of course...
All in all, as before, there's little to be lost in giving it a go and see how it fares...
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I dont think totaly sealed and soneone else I met said same, I forced grease in a Rockwell saw yesterday , it looks sealed but grease went in.
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On 3/27/2010 1:41 PM ransley spake thus:

Well, I don't know about *totally* sealed. Probably not a hermetic seal, just a pretty good one. If you can force some grease in, all the better.
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What's the technique? Dab of grease on your finger, and keep mashing it toward the berring and the shaft? Spray some white lith? Greasegun and injector needle?
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On 3/27/2010 5:37 PM Stormin Mormon spake thus:

"Berring"? wut, du u spel foneticaly?

They make tools for regreasing bearings, but I don't have one. I've tried the "smooshing" technique, which will get a little grease in there, which is better than nothing.
Question: Do you ever intend to stop top-posting and fix your broken news message formatting? You're the odd man out here, you know.
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No, I will continue to top post, thank you. If you aren't bright enough to remember the previous post, I did include it at the bottom.
You won't get any grease pushed into a sealed bearing like those used in the man's router. You will destroy the bearing attempting it unless you can devise some way to drill a small non-destructive hole in the metal seal through which you might be able to add some lube to the bearing. Knowing what grease, what viscosity, etc requires additional research.
The bearing costs about $2. You need to disassemble the router to get to the bearings. I can't imagine it being remotely cost effective to try to re-lube one.
Your mileage may vary.
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Hey,dumbass,the problem is reading the thread after a few posts have been added to it.Do YOU read bottom to top? you destroy the thread's continuity,if you can understand that big word.
Top posting is a no-no in UseNet convention.
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plonk me now. I've been top posting on usenet for over 10 years. I've never seen any sense in scrolling through multiple paragraphs to find someone's one or two word comment. I resent the need to do so, but suffer through it to accommodate the retarded people that can't remember what they read yesterday.
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I would much prefer to be praised or lambasted based on my contributions, knowledge of trade, or lack thereof. I usually only post when I thin my answer will be helpful to someone on a subject that I do for a living everyday. I'm sorry to have spent this much time on this stupidity.
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On Mon, 29 Mar 2010 01:16:30 -0800, David Nebenzahl

+1 on that.
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On Mar 27, 8:37pm, "Stormin Mormon"

It actualy went in my old circ saw in the bearing when I forced in some, but a router has a bearing on the top and any leaking out will ruin the commutator and brushes I think, It runs great no noise but I want to do alot of heavy use with it so Im trying to be cautious and hopefully not burn out the bearings, my manual says its greased for life, but its old and im sure the grease is dry.
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You may want to find out if replacement bearings are available. I have been known to the replace bearings on old but working equipment for the same reason. I didn't want it to seize up on me one day and ruin something that couldn't be replaced.
Jimmie
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Im sure my local PC-Porter Cable dealers has them , this PC unit was and is their main design, I didnt think i could do it I thought I would need a press or special tools to remove and reinstall them
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On 3/29/2010 12:26 PM ransley spake thus:

If the bearings seem OK, they probably are. They will let you know pretty clearly when they're ready to go: they will start making bad noises, and they usually don't fail catastrophically. I'd be surprised if you couldn't find replacements pretty easily, maybe even somewhere nearby that has them in stock. (There's an Ace hardware store near me that has whole selection of replacement ball bearings.)
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I never though of Ace, luckily I have the biggest commercial tool supplier, repair shop nearby that have about everything and anything in pro tools, and I bought all my PC stuff there years ago. im really tired of seeing made in china on anything-everything I buy.
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