New regs to make furnace replacement more expensive

Page 5 of 8  
On Mon, 26 Nov 2012 18:30:54 -0600, Vic Smith

You sniped all of the logic and leave the conclusion. Then complain that he's calling you names. You really are a moron.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 26 Nov 2012 20:20:51 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzz wrote:

There was no logic after I stopped mentioning that furnace and water heater are independent on the same stack. Just repetition of name-calling and endless cut and paste. BTW, your "logic" doesn't get many raves around here either. Geez, we just had an exchange about cell phones or something, and you were civil. But I'm not talking about cell phones now. So fuck you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 26 Nov 2012 19:35:04 -0600, Vic Smith

No surprise that you didn't recognize it..

There is no surprise that you'd come to that conclusion either. You are one dumb shit.

Your most intelligent and mature response one the NG yet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No logic? I gave you references from:
State Govt Cornell University Home Inspection Website
All of them address the issue of orphaned chimneys. And all say you are dead wrong. It really isn't a hard concept to grasp. A chimney that is too large for the appliance it serves will have slow moving combustion gases passing through it. In winter, in cold climates, the water in those gases condenses. Natural gas produces acidic condensate which, over time, will cause the mortar in chimneys to fail. If this condensate is not acidic and capable of damage, why do some jurisdictions require neutralizers on condensate drains from natural gas furnaces? If it's potentially bad for a drain system, why is it OK to put it into a masonry chimney? When the chimney had both a furnace and a water heater, it was kept warm enough by the furnace in the cold of winter so that the gases of both the furnace and the water heater could not condense.
I also showed you photos of chimneys with damage from that problem. You claimed that no such problem exists and that no chimneys have been damaged by it. And I pointed out that the National Fuel Gas Code specifies the min and max chimney sizes permitted for given appliances connected to that chimney. You told us it didn't matter. Until you told us it did matter, but only because of drafting. Truth is both issues are factors.
BTW, where are YOUR references, that say the orphaned chimney problem does not exist?

No, the only name calling was at the very end. And as per k, it was the conclusion after all the evidence was given.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Too bad trader ain't one of them. Hey, I don't like who I don't like. Get used it or kill-file me. Or whatever you choose. You can go ahead and find him useful if you like. What's with the "liberal" stuff? "Cracker" got your knees jerking again?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"People like me?" Well, hell, ain't you special! And shaming me! Oh, mama! BTW, cracker and cracker-barrel aren't related.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It would seem to me that when lib Congressmen claim that calling Susan Rice incompetent is racist, that using the "cracker-barrel" term is fair game for racism too. Of course libs have some mighty strange rules.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hi, This is no brainer. Higher efficiency furnaces and higher SEER a/c units. I got digned pretty bad when I upgraded ~20 yo system during summer time. 98% efficiency furnace, 18SEER a/c and HRV box, wireless thermostat, etc. I had to cancel my summer vacation to pay for it, LOL! Utility bill shows slight barely noticeable power and gas savings.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What was the efficiency of the 20 year old system? Having a barely noticeable energy savings on gas and electric when replacing a system that old would seem to be very unusual. I put in a new 93% gas furnace and 14 SEER AC two years ago and the difference was large. It cut my gas bill almost in half, summer AC by about 30% or so.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11-24-2012 09:36, Home Guy wrote:

Did you read the date of the article? That deadline hasn't happened yet.
--
Wes Groleau

Nutrition for Blokes: Re-engineering your diet for life
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 24 Nov 2012 12:46:28 -0500, Wes Groleau

The deadline is long past up here in Ontario.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Home Guy wrote:

Idiot.
The issue is about the higher costs of more efficient heating/cooling systems.
Issues regarding venting are only the effect, not the cause, of the increased cost.
This article came from a New Jersey news source and in New Jersey they are more concerned with heating than air conditioning. Had a similar article been written for Atlanta, the writers would have dwelled on a/c costs with only a passing mention of heating systems.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Here in Atlanta, they're the same thing. ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What's condensing in a furnace?? Never heard of that before.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ashton Crusher wrote:

Modern household furnaces are classified as condensing or non-condensing based on their efficiency in extracting heat from the exhaust gases.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furnace
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Flue gas exhaust from a furnace contains water vapor. If you can condense some of that steam back to water, you can get more heat from the fire.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

What's condensing in a furnace?? Never heard of that before.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doesn't that eventually leave you with an icky sticky gummy residue?
On Sat, 24 Nov 2012 20:46:14 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nope. NG is very clean and water is well, water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I havn't known that to be a problem. The condensate does tend to be strongly acidic. I put in a 90 percenter in my own home, I think it was year 2004. It has been repaired once since then. The draft inducer fan went dead, and I had to go buy another one.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 25 Nov 2012 07:49:45 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

They make limestone neutralizers for the discharge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.