Need to tap off circuit for kitchen hi-hats

I had posted another thread a few days ago about an upcoming kitchen reno. Here's another electrical question. As I said before I have to run 4 new 20A Circuits to a panel.
1 circuit -Fridge 1 circuit -Microwave/Range Hood 2 circuits- Counter top outlets
Now I have to address the lighting issue. Presently I have one fixture in the middle ( which is coming off a 20A bathroom circuit). I am adding at least 4-6 hi-hats in addition to keeping the middle fixture. My intention was after I tear down the walls and ceiling to re-wire the lights the right way to an existing 15A lighting circuit, but in the event I can't find one nearby, what are my options?
1-Keep it on the existing 20A bathroom circuit 2-Tap off one of the 4 circuits I'm running for the kitchen
The panel will be pretty full after running the 4 new circuits, so running a seperate 15 A line is not an option.
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I would not use the bath or various kitchen receptical circuits as a light circuit source. What other nearby lighting circuits are there and what is their loads? Like dining room, hall, family room, living room, other rooms near the kitchen. You can run a new piece of 14/2 from an existing lighting circuit breaker. Just figure out which one still has capacity. You're looking to keep it under 80%. Otherwise you can double up a single box slot with one of those two 15a breakers in a single slot. Lowes has them.
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Does that circuit serve the required bathroom GFCI receptacle? Then it is not allowed to serve loads outside the bathroom. If it serves only other loads in the bathroom (lighting, fans, etc.), then it is fine to have the kitchen lights on it.

Putting the kitchen lights on the 2 SABCs (countertop circuits) is not allowed.
Putting the kitchen lights on the circuit with the microwave/range hood is only allowed if the microhood is hardwired, not cord-and-plug-connected, which is unlikely.
Putting the kitchen lights on the refrigerator circuit is fine, and depending on the rating of the refrigerator you probably have sufficient capacity on that circuit if you make it a 20A circuit.
Since you are talking about kitchen lighting, don't forget about the energy code. In California, for example, there is a requirement that a certain percentage by wattage (50%?) of the kitchen lighting be high-efficacy lighting. Since it is measured by wattage, that means most of the lighting. And CFLs in standard medium base sockets don't count as high-efficacy, you have to use sockets that will not accept low-efficacy lamps.
Cheers, Wayne
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I guess I can't do it then because that whole bathroom (lighting,fan,GFI outlet) is on one 20A breaker.

Ok, I figured that would be bad

It is corded, so count that out.

It is going to be a dedicated 20A for the fridge. My only concern was if the lights would dim everytime the fridge kicked on. But this is not a full size 36" fridge. This is for a 30" fridge, which I'm assuming uses less power.
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Well, you can find out the load by checking the nameplate rating of the refrigerator. If you haven't selected one yet, check a few of the proper size and style. Since the refrigerator will be designed to work on a 15A circuit, you'll have at least 5A of headroom for lighting with your 20A circuit.
As for dimming, that could definitely happen. You could run your circuit from the panel to the refrigerator receptacle first and upsize that run to #10 or #8 Cu (just watch the box fill). That would reduce the voltage drop when the compressor starts up. Then you could run #12 Cu from there onwards for all the lighting. Everything would still be on a 20A breaker.
Cheers, Wayne
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On Wed, 6 Oct 2010 16:00:13 +0000 (UTC), Wayne Whitney

Modern refrigerators are only a few amps. My 36" double door Whirlpool is about 3.6a.
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