Name of plug in US

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wrote:

'60s? <guffaw>
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On Sun, 01 May 2011 10:35:12 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

--
The "GR" connector spamtrap 1888 was talking about is, in fact, a
double banana plug/jack with the contacts on 0.75" centers.
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Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

http://shop.vetcosurplus.com/catalog/popup_image.php?pID ˆ18
Hope This Helps! Rich
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Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

THERE IS NO APOSTROPHE IN THE POSSESSIVE ITS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Please clue up.
Rich Grise, Self-Appointed Chief, Internet Apostrophe Police
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"Geoffrey S. Mendelson" wrote:

No, It was developed by Galvin manufacturing, who called their first car radio the 'Motorola'. Then they changed the company's name to Motorola.

How so? The Motorola plug has an exposed center conductor, and spring contacts on the body to hold it in the jack.
The RCA jack was developed for radios to add a Phono input to sell turntables instead of the existing acoustic phonos. The connector has a shorter center pin, and the outer contact was split ever 90 degrees to allow it to be forced over the jack. Most early phono connectors I saw wouldn't fit inside a Motorola jack, and the center contact was too short to reach the center of a Motorola jack. Also, the braid of the shielded cable was soldered to the shell of the Phono connector, but the Motorola plugs were crimped to the shield of the RG-62, 93 ohm coax. Some OEMs didn't even solder the center pin. Instead, they shoved a piece of rubber into it, to hold the wire to the side.
<http://www.motorola.com/Consumers/US-EN/About_Motorola/History/Timeline

Of course they did. At one time a 'Factory radio' for a Ford vehicle could be a Bendix, a Motorola, or a Philco. General Motors radios were built by Delco, who built home radios at one time. The smaller car companies bought customized radios from various manufacturers with the required nosepiece, shaft spacings and lengths to fit that car.

Not true. A lot of early US radios used the same connectors for batteries. Tube families all used the same sockets. Binding Posts, Phone Tip Jacks, and Banana Jacks were very common to connect headphone or speakers. The common terminal strips were used as well.
Most of the military connectors developed for W.W.II were obsolete soon after the war ended, and the next generation of Military electronics was developed. They are the hardest thing to find when you collect surplus military electronics.
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wrote:

A friend's mother has an RCA radio with a Television jack. Apparently it was "television ready" in that you could plug your speakerless, audio-amplifier-free RCA television into it.
The problem with both the RCA plug and the Motorola plug, compared to other coaxial plugs, is that the hot lead makes contact before the ground does.
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spamtrap1888 wrote:

That's because they were never intended to be plugged in to equipment under power, due to leakage currents in the AC powered equipment. There is a Switchcraft version of the Phono/RCA that has a built in switch to be used hot. It can be wired to short out the connector, until the plug is inserted.
Explain want difference it would make on a car radio? that is the only application it was designed for.
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wrote:

A pin connected to a long metal rod, inserted into an amplifier input -- what could possibly go wrong?
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spamtrap1888 wrote:

Nothing that you would understand. Leave electronics to those who know what they are doing, but practice your pathetic trolling somewhere else.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

This is s.e.basics - even _YOU_ were a newbie before you knew everything there is to know.
And it's rude to insult those who are trying to learn, you arrogant asshole.
By the way, how's that diabetic neuropathy stuff workin' out for ya?
Thanks, Rich
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wrote:

Looks like someone put on the CRANKYPANTS this morning.
I note that all subsequent RF connectors were designed to connect the shield first.
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spamtrap1888 wrote:

Bullshit. Go troll somewhere else, or read up on connectors.
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The car radio antenna plug is often called "Motorola" no doubt it has a technical name too, but Wikipedia doesn't seem to know it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motorola_connector
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Jasen Betts wrote:

I didn't realize it was that common.
Paul
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Jasen Betts wrote:

http://shop.vetcosurplus.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id ˆ18 close-up: http://shop.vetcosurplus.com/catalog/popup_image.php?pID ˆ18
Hope This Helps! Rich
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"The Ghost in The Machine"
THE ONES IN THE PIX ARE BNC CONNECTORS,
** Wrong.
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"The Ghost in The Machine"
OOPS!!! ON SECOND VIEWING THE ONE IN THE PIX IS USING CLASSY RCA PLUGS,
** Wrong again.
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Phil Allison wrote:

Well, they looked like audiophool-grade RCAs to me; if not, then what ARE they, or are you just having another tantrum?
Thanks, Rich
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The connectors in the photo are "press-on F" connectors. Cheap to make, they simply slide on the chassis threaded F. They are horrible and cause a lot of issues as they do not allow proper and tight sheilding.
e-ya later! Klay Anderson's iPhone 4/iOS4.3.2 Try FaceTime!
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I don't think that's correct. An F connector normally uses the center conductor of the cable -- a wire -- as the center connection -- not an RCA-like plug.
The press-on F connectors I've seen use a slotted jacket that usually fits snugly and rarely causes problems.
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