Money down the drain - ordered whole house water regulator.

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Questor wrote:

The standard water pressure regulators for homes that I've worked with were all factory set for 50 psi. The problem with an unregulated supply of city water has to do with pressure spikes that can damage various valves such as the flush valves in toilet tanks and the electric solenoid valves in dishwashers, washing machines and ice makers. The pressure spikes can also cause the T/P valve on your water heater to leak. I once replaced a 1" regulator at a service station that had 190 psi static pressure from the city water. The pressure spikes were much higher and blew out the rubber seats in all the sinks and wrecked all the big expensive chrome Sloan flush valves in the restrooms. The outdoor hose spigot was still at 190 psi and was great fun to shoot streams of water across the street.
TDD
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Just cut your 1 inch water main (or 3/4") and install a short length of smaller (like 1/2" ) pipe - cheaper than a regulator, a whole lot less trouble prone, and just about as effective.
Or do like I did and install a ball valve for a shut-off. If you think the pressure is too high, half close the valve to reduce the flow rate.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It's so easy to install the proper regulator. I've installed a lot of them over the years and most of them have been made by Watts like the N55B and the 25AUB-Z3.
http://tinyurl.com/r3vd4m
http://tinyurl.com/rdsguz
TDD
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Just worried that if two or more faucets were opened a more reduced flow would be noticed, whereas with a regulator it might not.
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wrote:

There is static and dynamic pressure also. Shutting down a valve or putting in a smaller pipe will not reduce the static pressure. Do the job right and use a regulator if you need one.
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replying to clare, JMinSanDiego wrote:

will transmit full street pressure if there's no flow.
Half-closing the valve also has no benefit when there is no flow. The pressure in the building will not be magically reduced in the absence of flow.
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Doubling the water pressure does not double the flow. 150psi fill flow double the water that 50psi will through a given opening, according to WATTS, manufacturer of domestic water pressure reduction valves.
According to them also, 80psi is considered "standard" household pressure while many mains can run as high as 200psi. Most codes require reduction valves if pressure excedes 80psi.
50 psi is piddle pressure.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Most of the Temperature and Pressure Relief Valves on domestic/American water heaters are set for 150 psi. If you have a static pressure of 80 psi and no regulator on your home water supply, you may often get pressure spikes that exceed the limit on the relief valve on the water heater. After a time, the valve can start leaking. Last year, it happened to a friend who's water bill went way up. She had a leaking T/P valve on the water heater after the water dept upgraded the water lines in her area. Her static water pressure was around 80 psi and when I put pressure gauge on her water line, I could see it jump to over 100 psi every so often. The installation of a regulator and new T/P valve solved the problem. There was plenty of water flow at the factory set 50 psi.
TDD
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On May 25, 10:54pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

80 PSI is standard and over 80 PSI requires pressure regulation? 50 PSI is piddle pressure? Hmmm.
Codes dictate that the pressure cannot be below 40 PSI nor above 80 PSI. The factory setting for a pressure reducing valve is 50 PSI. It's also interesting that your idea of standard pressure is above the Watts adjustable range upper limit of 75 PSI. All of Watts standard capacity reducing valves have the same upper limit and factory setting for a reason. http://www.watts.com/pro/_products_sub.asp?catId=64&parCat=285
R
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Finnally picked up the pressure meter and get 65psi the regulator I ordered is factory set for 45, that's a 31% reduction. I don't know what that translates to in water volume(gallons), but I'm going to go for it.
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Once you have it installed you can adjust it to give you water pressure at your sink and showers that keeps you happy. I'd probably bump up the pressure to 50.
R
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Pressure does not translate to gallons.
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Guess I need a lesson in pipe measurement. Got the regulator today and the diameter of the input threads is 1.25" the diameter of the pipe I wanted to connect it to is 1". The box says 1" and the regulator is stamped 1". It's my fault probably due to my ignorance on the matter. I emailed the supplier asking if I should request a RMA or get fittings.
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Reducer bushings will fix that. Any hardware store should have them.
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inside so a "1 inch" pipe is about 1.25" on the outside. What you need is a couple of 1" to 3/4" reducer bushings. If that makes the unit too long, try to exchange it for a 3/4" regulator. Be careful not to get it installed backwards by mistake.
Don Young
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Finnaly after a little bout with the flu bug and mulling around about the parts I needed, I installed the regulator and it's working great. I am wondering on average about how long they last. Anyway here's a link about thread sizes and the one for the place I bought the regulator from;
http://www.plumbingsupply.com/pipethreadsizing.html
http://www.plumbingworld.com/pressure_regulators_water.html
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With a measured incoming water pressure of 65, I wouldn't have put money into a regulator. That pressure is well within the normal, acceptable range, so it's unclear what real problems you are having.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I've seen static water pressures that low when folks were having problems. If you watch the pressure meter long enough or have a meter that has a peak indicator, you may see pressure spikes of over 100 psi. The most static pressure I've ever seen on a city water system was 195 psi and the pressure spikes were off the scale.
TDD
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